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  • Panel data on municipal waste and recycling.
    • Software/Code
    • Dataset
  • This study uses retrospective population data from the 2015 face-to-face multi-purpose survey by ISTAT. This survey focused on collecting data about eating habits and nutritional aspects, and it was conducted through face-to-face guided interviews with a pre-defined questionnaire. The survey aimed at Italian families; each family was selected with random criterion by the municipal registry lists, according to a statistically representative sample of the population residing in Italy. Among 45,336 interviewees (19,158 families) of all ages, we focus on participants with 6-10 years old children (2,125 interviewees) and their parents. Information is provided directly from all subjects over 14 aged; for children aged 6-10 years a parent or an adult component of the family answered the questions in proxy modality. Only a part of the items was devoted to children, differently adults answered all the various parts of the questionnaire (ISTAT 2016).
    • Software/Code
  • Supplementary_Material_(1) for “Mom, dad, look at me”: The development of the Parental Phubbing Scale by Luca Pancani, Tiziano Gerosa, Marco Gui and Paolo Riva in Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
    • Document
  • The widespread diffusion of smartphones has opened new challenges regarding the psychological consequences of their usage on social relationships. The term phubbing (a combination of phone and snubbing) indicates the act of ignoring someone in a social context by paying attention to the smartphone. The few existing studies show that phubbing is widespread, mutually reinforced, and socially accepted, with possible negative consequences for social and individual well-being. Phubbing can occur in every social context, including romantic relationships, workplaces, and family. However, to date, minimal attention has been given to the possible impact that phubbing carried out by parents can have on their children. To start filling this gap, in this paper, we introduced a new scale that measures the perception of being subject to parental phubbing and showed the prevalence of perceived phubbing on a stratified sample of 3,289 adolescents. Firstly, the dimensionality, validity, and invariance of the construct were proven. Moreover, our results showed a positive relationship between children’s perceived levels of parental phubbing and their feelings of social disconnection with parents, thus suggesting that the more children felt that one or both of their parents were phubbing them, the less the children felt connected with their parents.
    • Collection
  • Supplemental material, Appendix_A__supp_mat for Predicting problematic smartphone use over time in adolescence: A latent class regression analysis of online and offline activities by Anne-Linda Camerini, Tiziano Gerosa and Laura Marciano in New Media & Society
    • Document
  • Despite today’s ubiquitous nature of smartphones among adolescents, little is known about behavioural online and offline longitudinal predictors of problematic smartphone use (PSU). Guided by Uses and Gratifications Theory, we applied latent class analysis on survey data collected in 2017 from a cohort of 1096 adolescents (Mage = 12.4, SDage = 0.56) and regressed PSU measured 1 year later on class membership, controlling for socio-demographic characteristics, social desirability and autoregressive effects. We extracted four distinct classes: social-recreational onliners (n = 228), weekend onliners (n = 331), balanced (n = 404) and noninvolved (n = 153). Characterised by significantly more time spent online for recreational and social networking activities, both during weekdays and weekend days, as well as less time for sleep, the social-recreational onliners class showed significantly higher levels of PSU over time. Future studies should assess not only duration but also the frequency of daily online activities to provide further insights into behavioural predictors of PSU.
    • Collection
  • Supplemental Material, PPS_scale for “Mom, dad, look at me”: The development of the Parental Phubbing Scale by Luca Pancani, Tiziano Gerosa, Marco Gui and Paolo Riva in Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
    • Document
    • Event
  • Digital Well-Being – Parental Phubbing is a cross-sectional database extracted from the second wave of data collection of the Digital Well-being – Schools project, funded by the University of Milano-Bicocca (Innovation Project Grant). The invitation to take part in this project was extended to all the high school in the territorial areas 23, 27 and 28 of the provinces of Milan and Monza-Brianza (Lombardy region, Northern Italy). At the end of the recruitment process, 18 out of 42 schools signed the training agreement, with a final enrollment rate of 43%. In May 2018, all the students at grade 10 (15-16 years old) of the 18 participating schools were surveyed through a CAWI methodology (Computer Assisted Web Interviewing) under the supervision of external observers. The questionnaire was finally administered to 3,289 participants located in 171 classes, achieving a total response rate of 90%. The dataset refers to an extract from the original questionnaire and provide detailed information on students perceived parental phubbing, social disconnection, and a set of socio-demographic and school related characteristics. Thanks to this dataset, the authors developed a brief and psychometrically valid scale to assess parental phubbing in adolescents, the Parental Phubbing Scale (PPS). Indeed, the PPS measures perceived phubbing distinctly and separately from each parent and, at the same time, these two dimensions jointly measure the overall dimension of parental phubbing.
    • Dataset
  • Supplemental Material, Gui_Buchi_online_supplement for From Use to Overuse: Digital Inequality in the Age of Communication Abundance by Marco Gui and Moritz Büchi in Social Science Computer Review
    • Document
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