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Bruwer, M., Presta, P. & Freeman, C. (2019, May). From global to local, a case study in using 101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication. Paper presented at the 2019 Medical Library Association 119th Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL. Objectives: This project set out to develop our research skills, inform our professional practice and strengthen our capabilities to align with the strategic objectives of a research intensive university. We embarked on practitioner based research, utilising a globally conducted survey to determine the tools used in the evolving scholarly communication workflows of our early career researchers in the health sciences. Methods: Our project team contacted the creators of “101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication” and received permission to utilise their survey. Ethics approval was obtained and the survey re-created using Qualtrics. Permission was sought from the Faculties of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences, and Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences to distribute the survey. Approximately 1140 researchers received an invitation via the assigned faculty mailing lists. Eighty-five researchers initiated the survey and 84 completed it, yielding a participation rate of 7.36%. Survey results were analysed using SPSS software. Of the 84 who completed the survey, 18 indicated that they were willing to be contacted further, and eight semi-structured interviews were conducted, recorded and analysed in NVivo. Results: Results indicated that although early career researchers are overwhelmingly in support of open access and open science, tension exists due to the expectations associated with advancing their careers. These attitudes signal that key developments in scholarly communication in coming years will foreseeably be related to open access. To remain relevant and prepare ourselves for future roles, librarians need to be cognisant of the big changes in practices ahead. This project connected theory to practice and highlighted gaps in existing knowledge. By presenting to colleagues on the project and sharing newly gained knowledge, the librarians initiated dialogue around new developments such as open peer review, preprints and reproducibility. Conclusions: Librarians must increasingly adapt and take control of their professional development in order to remain relevant within a changing university environment. In addition to maintaining familiarity with scholarly communication tools and other factors that contribute to the openness of research, the project resulted in increased visibility and standing within the organisation. It enabled librarians to expand their networks and afforded opportunities to collaborate externally. The librarians have been invited to contribute and participate in a number of projects, committees and working parties, and to facilitate training sessions for peers and faculty.
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Codebooks for raw datasets to PaRCADS Study 1 & 2
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Internationally and within Australia, there is increasing recognition that patterns of participation in sport are changing, with so called ‘informal’ sport displacing organised sport in terms of popularity in many people’s lives. Health and Physical Education (HPE) can learn from informal sport in order to effectively support sustained participation in physical activity and sport that is relevant to young people’s involvement now and in the future. This 'what works for informal sport' sheet can be used by students and teachers to evaluate environmental, task, personal and social factors that influence their participation in various forms of informal sport and physical activity. The documents can be used as an initial assessment tool to gauge what young people know and understand in relation to participation and be added to formatively as a unit progresses and concepts are revisited. The forms can also serve to inform young people about things they will need to consider when starting an informal sporting group or looking to participate in one. Understanding these elements has implications for lifelong and lifewide participation, and with a focus on considering the needs of others in low-competitive contexts, extend relevance and appeal for many students.
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These are the reference genomes against which we assessed reads and consensus sequences.
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Raw data and statistics files to accompany figure 8 of the manuscript Metformin rescues muscle function in BAG3 myofibrillar myopathy models
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This macro is designed to work with 4 channel confocal images where channel 1 is a nuclear stain and the other three channels are RNAscope puncta stains. The macro extracts the nuclei and classifies cells as positive or negative for each RNAscope marker based on a user defined cuttoff. Individual cells are also processed to count the raw number of RNAscope spots for each channel.
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In addition to the online survey, the project team conducted follow-up interviews with participants who indicated a willingness to be interviewed. The interviews were conducted across 3 Monash University campuses either in person or via Zoom video-conferencing. The interviews were structured around a pre-arranged set of questions. These served as a guide to the interviewer and provided a consistent structure for the interview format. The time allocated for each interview was 45 minutes.
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Data accompanying: Genomic surveillance for hypervirulence and multi-drug resistance in invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae from south and southeast Asia Kelly L Wyres, To N T Nguyen, Margaret M C Lam, Louise M Judd, Nguyen van Vinh Chau, David A B Dance, Margaret Ip, Abhilasha Karkey, Clare L Ling, Thyl Miliya, Paul N Newton, Lan Nguyen, Amphone Sengduangphachanh, Paul Turner, Balaji Veeraraghavan, Phat Voong Vinh, Manivanh Vongsouvath, Nicholas R Thomson, Stephen Baker and Kathryn E Holt
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Raw data and statistics files to accompany figure 3 of the manuscript Metformin rescues muscle function in BAG3 myofibrillar myopathy models
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International Research in Early Childhood Education: 2011, Volume 2, Issue 1 International Research in Early Childhood Education (IRECE) is an open-access electronic peer-reviewed journal. Articles in this journal explore aspects of early childhood education within international, local or regional contexts. Some articles may address issues arising from interdisciplinary relationships between early childhood education and other fields, such as post-developmental approaches to psychology, socio-cultural/cultural historical research, cultural-activity research, maternal and child health, migration studies, environmental science and globalisation, refugee studies, international policy studies, feminism and queer studies, space and place, as well as post-structuralist research. IRECE is published annually as a single volume, in Melbourne Australia. It continues the older serial Australian Research in Early Childhood Education. Submissions come from around the world. The editors encourage the submission of a variety of high quality manuscripts including: reports of research from a variety of paradigms; special issues on a particular theme; articles about research, literature reviews and theoretical discussions; book reviews; invited commentaries. More information about the journal and who to contact: https://www.monash.edu/education/research/publications/journals/irece
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