Filter Results
19 results
  • SV7. Oscillator-free configuration with weak feedback strength (simulation). The same illustration as in SV2, for the oscillator-free configuration with a weak feedback strength, which imposes smaller intersegmental phase lags and a lower frequency.
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • SV8. Oscillator-free configuration with strong feedback strength (simulation). The same illustration as in SV2, for the oscillator-free configuration with a strong feedback strength, which imposes larger intersegmental phase lags and a higher frequency.
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • The SPR technique is based on a complex optical phenomenon. When photon reaches the interface of two medium with different refractive indexes at a specific angle range, the resonant oscillation of surface plasmon generated by metal free electron can be induced. The resonance also requires that the frequency of incident photon matches the natural oscillating frequency of the surface plasmon. https://www.profacgen.com/surface-plasmon-resonance-spr-service.htm
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • The SPR technique is based on a complex optical phenomenon. When photon reaches the interface of two medium with different refractive indexes at a specific angle range, the resonant oscillation of surface plasmon generated by metal free electron can be induced. The resonance also requires that the frequency of incident photon matches the natural oscillating frequency of the surface plasmon. https://www.profacgen.com/surface-plasmon-resonance-spr-service.htm
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • Slime mould Physarum polycephalum is a single cell which physically oscillates via contraction of actomyosin in order to achieve motility. Several of its apparently ‘intelligent’ behaviour patterns such as anticipatory responses to periodic stimuli have recently been attributed as functions of the coupling between the oscillating intracellular reactions which drive its rhythmic muscular contraction, but the mechanisms that underlie these phenomena have not yet been experimentally verified. Through laboratory investigations in which we entrain the P. polycephalum plasmodium via periodic ultraviolet light exposure we find that this phenomenon is likely to result from biasing its various oscillating life processes through altering local concentration profiles of various allosteric molecules and their effectors. This temporarily overwrites the global streaming clock frequency and eradicates the wave packets usually observed in slime mould biomechanical oscillation. This response is likened to an intracellular chemical memory. We proceed to present a multi-agent model in which we demonstrate that travelling waves and oscillatory clock frequencies may emerge in the virtual organism’s biomechanical oscillator, although anticipatory responses cannot be replicated by simple mechanical interactions. We conclude by arguing that these phenomena are best characterised as analogue computation and discuss practical applications therein. The Physarum polycephalum actin network in a plasmodial tubule. SiR-actin staining, scale bar 200 μm.
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • Slime mould Physarum polycephalum is a single cell which physically oscillates via contraction of actomyosin in order to achieve motility. Several of its apparently ‘intelligent’ behaviour patterns such as anticipatory responses to periodic stimuli have recently been attributed as functions of the coupling between the oscillating intracellular reactions which drive its rhythmic muscular contraction, but the mechanisms that underlie these phenomena have not yet been experimentally verified. Through laboratory investigations in which we entrain the P. polycephalum plasmodium via periodic ultraviolet light exposure we find that this phenomenon is likely to result from biasing its various oscillating life processes through altering local concentration profiles of various allosteric molecules and their effectors. This temporarily overwrites the global streaming clock frequency and eradicates the wave packets usually observed in slime mould biomechanical oscillation. This response is likened to an intracellular chemical memory. We proceed to present a multi-agent model in which we demonstrate that travelling waves and oscillatory clock frequencies may emerge in the virtual organism’s biomechanical oscillator, although anticipatory responses cannot be replicated by simple mechanical interactions. We conclude by arguing that these phenomena are best characterised as analogue computation and discuss practical applications therein. The Physarum polycephalum actin network in a plasmodial tubule. SiR-actin staining, scale bar 200 μm.
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • Movie S8. Oscillator-free configuration with strong feedback strength (simulation). The same illustration as in Movie S2, for the oscillator-free configuration with a strong feedback strength, which imposes larger intersegmental phase lags and a higher frequency.
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • Movie S7. Oscillator-free configuration with weak feedback strength (simulation). The same illustration as in Movie S2, for the oscillator-free configuration with a weak feedback strength, which imposes smaller intersegmental phase lags and a lower frequency.
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • Movie S7. Oscillator-free configuration with weak feedback strength (simulation). The same illustration as in Movie S2, for the oscillator-free configuration with a weak feedback strength, which imposes smaller intersegmental phase lags and a lower frequency.
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • Movie S8. Oscillator-free configuration with strong feedback strength (simulation). The same illustration as in Movie S2, for the oscillator-free configuration with a strong feedback strength, which imposes larger intersegmental phase lags and a higher frequency.
    Data Types:
    • Video