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The aims of this collaborative research study between University of Cape Town and University of Sheffield study were to explore the contemporary play environments of children in order to identify the ways in which children’s play is shaped by technology, to examine the relationship between digital play, learning and creativity, and to explore the role of adults in mediating digital play. One of the five objectives was to understand the dynamics operating across the digital ecology of children’s play (in homes, communities and schools) in terms of synergies, dissonance and transfer, and to identify the implications for learning. The study adopted a mixed-methods approach. Parents of 3-11 year-olds were invited to complete a survey, and 30 parents then took part in telephone interviews in order to follow-up themes from the survey in greater detail. Case studies with families were undertaken. In the case studies, parents and children were interviewed and videoed. Parents also filmed their children using technologies, and they and their children were asked questions about the videos. Parents were invited to share images and videos with researchers using WhatsApp. In addition, children in the families were given diaries to record their use of social media and television, and used Go-Pro cameras to record their digital play. Further, children were invited to build a toy they would like to be invented using LEGO bricks. Children were invited to create concept maps on a number of questions relating to play, technology and learning. In addition, the children were observed in schools using technology, and were also observed in a regular after-school club or community venue they visited. In each case, the child’s class teacher and the community/ after school club leader were interviewed. Finally, children in schools took part in focus group interviews in which they were invited to create collages, complete concept maps and build a toy they would like to be invented using LEGO bricks. In this study, we started with 10 families (one family with twins) from 9 schools in the Cape Town area, that is, 11 case-study children (see Table 1), who were selected by the teachers and observed in school. After the school visits, one family (case-study child Fahiema) decided not to participate in the family visits part of the field work. The transcripts for each of the case-study children and the telephonic interviews of 30 parents on follow-up themes from the survey is shared. To protect identities of participants, pseudonyms are used. The following qualitative data is shared: interviews with their teachers; focus-group discussions; community visits; family visits and telephonic parent interviews. NOTE: The research instruments used in this study were adapted from Marsh, J. Stjerne Thomsen, B., Parry, B., Scott, F. Bishop, J.C., Bannister, C., Driscoll, A., Margary, T., Woodgate, A., (2019) Children, Technology and Play. UK Survey Questions. LEGO Foundation.
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Presentation to the tutors at the University of Cape Town Writing Centre on 06 February 2020. This presentation covers an introduction of Wikipedia, and how it can effectively be used by students for research.
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This file set consists of oblique views of 3D models of the Gede ruins archaeological site. The views were generated from 3D models created using laser scanning and photogrammetric techniques. The ruins of Gede (also Gedi), a traditional Arab-African Swahili town, are located just off Kenya’s coastline, some 90km north of Mombasa. Gede was a small town built entirely from stones and rocks, and most of the original foundations are still visible today. Remaining structures at the site include coral stone buildings, mosques, houses and a palace. The town was abandoned in the early 17th century, and Gede’s buildings date back to the 15th century, although it is believed that the site could have been inhabited as early as the 11th or 12th century. The Zamani Project spatially documented the Gede ruins in 2010. In addition to the three principal structures of the Great Mosque, the Small Mosque and the Palace, remains of other structures in the immediate vicinity were also documented. The Zamani Project seeks to increase awareness and knowledge of tangible cultural heritage in Africa and internationally by creating metrically accurate digital representations of historical sites. Digital spatial data of cultural heritage sites can be used for research and education, for restoration and conservation and as a record for future generations. The Zamani Project operates as a non-profit organisation within the University of Cape Town. This text has been adapted from the UNESCO website (https://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/5501/). The Zamani Project received funding from the Andrew W Mellon Foundation at the time of the project.
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Quantitative data for manuscript Higgins G, Peres J, Abdalrahman T, Zaman MH, Lang DM, Prince S, Franz T. Cytoskeletal tubulin competes with actin to increase deformability of metastatic melanoma cells. bioRxiv, 2020, 929919. One Excel file with four spread sheets:1) Cell shape data,2) Migration data, 3) Western blot data, and 4) Microrheology data.
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This Presentation was given as an Opening Address at UCT Open Data Day on 6 March 2020.
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Julia Code to aid reproducibility for the paper: Malliavin-Mancino estimators implemented with the non-uniform fast Fourier transform. DOI for the Dataset: 10.25375/uct.11903442
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R codes (not cleaned) for primary analyses for MSc project. Note supplemental and linked R codes and datasets can be requested. This code shows methodology running most analyses.
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Presentation for UCT's Open Data Day held on the 06 March 2020. The presentation focuses on open government data for SDG reporting in African countries.
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Summary ROC plot of sensitivity versus specificity of handheld echocardiography for definite RHD generated for meta-analysis in the systematic review: Standard echocardiography versus handheld echocardiography for the detection of subclinical rheumatic heart disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic accuracy PROSPERO registration number: CRD42016051261 Plot was generated using the Review Manager (RevMan) software package, version 5.3. Meta-analysis was performed using SAS® software, version 9.4.
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This presentation was given at UCT's Open Data Day on 6th March 2020. The presentation outlines the utility of repeat photography in understanding changing landscapes, through citizen science. Historical landscape photographs are scientifically valuable evidence of what landscapes looked like in the past and can be a useful source of biodiversity data in otherwise data-deficient geographic regions. Acquiring repeats of historical photographs on broad geographic scales is possible through rePhotoSA, a collaborative citizen science project led by the Plant Conservation Unit and the FitzPatrick Institute at UCT, which hosts an open online repository of historical landscape images.
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  • Video