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This file set consists of oblique views of 3D models of the Gede ruins archaeological site. The views were generated from 3D models created using laser scanning and photogrammetric techniques. The ruins of Gede (also Gedi), a traditional Arab-African Swahili town, are located just off Kenya’s coastline, some 90km north of Mombasa. Gede was a small town built entirely from stones and rocks, and most of the original foundations are still visible today. Remaining structures at the site include coral stone buildings, mosques, houses and a palace. The town was abandoned in the early 17th century, and Gede’s buildings date back to the 15th century, although it is believed that the site could have been inhabited as early as the 11th or 12th century. The Zamani Project spatially documented the Gede ruins in 2010. In addition to the three principal structures of the Great Mosque, the Small Mosque and the Palace, remains of other structures in the immediate vicinity were also documented. The Zamani Project seeks to increase awareness and knowledge of tangible cultural heritage in Africa and internationally by creating metrically accurate digital representations of historical sites. Digital spatial data of cultural heritage sites can be used for research and education, for restoration and conservation and as a record for future generations. The Zamani Project operates as a non-profit organisation within the University of Cape Town. This text has been adapted from the UNESCO website (https://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/5501/). The Zamani Project received funding from the Andrew W Mellon Foundation at the time of the project.
Data Types:
  • Image
Julia Code to aid reproducibility for the paper: Malliavin-Mancino estimators implemented with the non-uniform fast Fourier transform. DOI for the Dataset: 10.25375/uct.11903442
Data Types:
  • Software/Code
Summary ROC plot of sensitivity versus specificity of handheld echocardiography for definite RHD generated for meta-analysis in the systematic review: Standard echocardiography versus handheld echocardiography for the detection of subclinical rheumatic heart disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic accuracy PROSPERO registration number: CRD42016051261 Plot was generated using the Review Manager (RevMan) software package, version 5.3. Meta-analysis was performed using SAS® software, version 9.4.
Data Types:
  • Image
This file set consists of elevations of 3D models of the Palace at the Gede ruins archaeological site. The elevations were generated from 3D models created using laser scanning and photogrammetric techniques. The ruins of Gede (also Gedi), a traditional Arab-African Swahili town, are located just off Kenya’s coastline, some 90km north of Mombasa. Gede was a small town built entirely from stones and rocks, and most of the original foundations are still visible today. Remaining structures at the site include coral stone buildings, mosques, houses and a palace. The town was abandoned in the early 17th century, and Gede’s buildings date back to the 15th century, although it is believed that the site could have been inhabited as early as the 11th or 12th century. The Zamani Project spatially documented the Gede ruins in 2010. In addition to the three principal structures of the Great Mosque, the Small Mosque and the Palace, remains of other structures in the immediate vicinity were also documented. The Zamani Project seeks to increase awareness and knowledge of tangible cultural heritage in Africa and internationally by creating metrically accurate digital representations of historical sites. Digital spatial data of cultural heritage sites can be used for research and education, for restoration and conservation and as a record for future generations. The Zamani Project operates as a non-profit organisation within the University of Cape Town. This text has been adapted from the UNESCO website (https://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/5501/). The Zamani Project received funding from the Andrew W Mellon Foundation at the time of the project.
Data Types:
  • Image
This file set consists of sections of 3D models of the Small Mosque at the Gede ruins archaeological site. The sections were generated from 3D models created using laser scanning and photogrammetric techniques. The ruins of Gede (also Gedi), a traditional Arab-African Swahili town, are located just off Kenya’s coastline, some 90km north of Mombasa. Gede was a small town built entirely from stones and rocks, and most of the original foundations are still visible today. Remaining structures at the site include coral stone buildings, mosques, houses and a palace. The town was abandoned in the early 17th century, and Gede’s buildings date back to the 15th century, although it is believed that the site could have been inhabited as early as the 11th or 12th century. The Zamani Project spatially documented the Gede ruins in 2010. In addition to the three principal structures of the Great Mosque, the Small Mosque and the Palace, remains of other structures in the immediate vicinity were also documented. The Zamani Project seeks to increase awareness and knowledge of tangible cultural heritage in Africa and internationally by creating metrically accurate digital representations of historical sites. Digital spatial data of cultural heritage sites can be used for research and education, for restoration and conservation and as a record for future generations. The Zamani Project operates as a non-profit organisation within the University of Cape Town. This text has been adapted from the UNESCO website (https://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/5501/). The Zamani Project received funding from the Andrew W Mellon Foundation at the time of the project.
Data Types:
  • Image
The R code explores the calibration and simulation of the Farmer and Joshi (2002) agent-based model of financial markets using the method of moments along with a genetic algorithm and a Nelder-Mead with threshold accepting algorithm. The model is used for understanding daily trading decisions made from closing auction to closing auction in equity markets, as it attempts to model financial market behaviour without the inclusion of agent adaptation. However, our attempt at calibrating the model has limited success in replicating important stylized facts observed in financial markets, similar to what has been found in other calibration experiments of the model. This leads us to extend the Farmer-Joshi model to include agent adaptation using a Brock-Hommes (1998) approach to strategy fitness based on trading strategy profitability. The adaptive Farmer-Joshi model allows trading agents to switch between strategies, favouring strategies that have been more profitable over some period of time determined by a free-parameter determining the profit monitoring time-horizon.
Data Types:
  • Software/Code
This file set consists of oblique views of 3D models of the Palace at the Gede ruins archaeological site. The oblique views were generated from 3D models created using laser scanning and photogrammetric techniques. The ruins of Gede (also Gedi), a traditional Arab-African Swahili town, are located just off Kenya’s coastline, some 90km north of Mombasa. Gede was a small town built entirely from stones and rocks, and most of the original foundations are still visible today. Remaining structures at the site include coral stone buildings, mosques, houses and a palace. The town was abandoned in the early 17th century, and Gede’s buildings date back to the 15th century, although it is believed that the site could have been inhabited as early as the 11th or 12th century. The Zamani Project spatially documented the Gede ruins in 2010. In addition to the three principal structures of the Great Mosque, the Small Mosque and the Palace, remains of other structures in the immediate vicinity were also documented. The Zamani Project seeks to increase awareness and knowledge of tangible cultural heritage in Africa and internationally by creating metrically accurate digital representations of historical sites. Digital spatial data of cultural heritage sites can be used for research and education, for restoration and conservation and as a record for future generations. The Zamani Project operates as a non-profit organisation within the University of Cape Town. This text has been adapted from the UNESCO website (https://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/5501/). The Zamani Project received funding from the Andrew W Mellon Foundation at the time of the project.
Data Types:
  • Image
This file set consists of oblique views of 3D models of the Gede ruins archaeological site. The views were generated from 3D models created using laser scanning and photogrammetric techniques. The ruins of Gede (also Gedi), a traditional Arab-African Swahili town, are located just off Kenya’s coastline, some 90km north of Mombasa. Gede was a small town built entirely from stones and rocks, and most of the original foundations are still visible today. Remaining structures at the site include coral stone buildings, mosques, houses and a palace. The town was abandoned in the early 17th century, and Gede’s buildings date back to the 15th century, although it is believed that the site could have been inhabited as early as the 11th or 12th century. The Zamani Project spatially documented the Gede ruins in 2010. In addition to the three principal structures of the Great Mosque, the Small Mosque and the Palace, remains of other structures in the immediate vicinity were also documented. The Zamani Project seeks to increase awareness and knowledge of tangible cultural heritage in Africa and internationally by creating metrically accurate digital representations of historical sites. Digital spatial data of cultural heritage sites can be used for research and education, for restoration and conservation and as a record for future generations. The Zamani Project operates as a non-profit organisation within the University of Cape Town. This text has been adapted from the UNESCO website (https://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/5501/). The Zamani Project received funding from the Andrew W Mellon Foundation at the time of the project.
Data Types:
  • Image
Julia Code to aid reproducibility for the paper: Malliavin-Mancino estimators implemented with the non-uniform fast Fourier transform. DOI for the Dataset: 10.25375/uct.11903442
Data Types:
  • Software/Code
Summary ROC plot of sensitivity versus specificity of handheld echocardiography for definite RHD generated for meta-analysis in the systematic review: Standard echocardiography versus handheld echocardiography for the detection of subclinical rheumatic heart disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic accuracy PROSPERO registration number: CRD42016051261 Plot was generated using the Review Manager (RevMan) software package, version 5.3. Meta-analysis was performed using SAS® software, version 9.4.
Data Types:
  • Image