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These are the abstracts from the 33rd Annual Sebastian K. Littmann Research Day, held on March 6, 2020.
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The Mind-Gut Connection is a virtual reality education application on the relationship between the digestive system, nervous system, and microbiome. Together, these systems form the gut-brain axis and communicate with one another to carry out physiological processes associated with digestion. By illustrating this complex medical topic in a virtual reality environment, we have addressed the lack of accurate or comprehensive depictions of the gut-brain axis. Additionally, the use of virtual reality in education may allow for a broader audience to be exposed to this information. Learning about digestion in relation to the gut-brain axis is beneficial for everyone because of the impact our diets and lifestyles have on our physical and mental health. The use of this virtual reality program has the potential to better engage and inform the general public so that they are more aware of how our different body systems are interconnected. Not only is this program novel in addressing such a unique but important topic, it also exhibits innovation upon current virtual reality practices surrounding movement and motion sickness. The use of full-body virtual reality and a natural form of locomotion using arm swinging builds upon existing methods to improve the level of immersion and believability.
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The Canadian University Survey Consortium found that 56% of students in tertiary education have experienced some form of experiential learning (EL). Scholars engaged with EL argue that Reflective Practice is necessary to provide the transformative learning experience that distinguishes EL from traditional lectures. Our session will explore student perceptions of the merits of reflection before and after an intervention. This research took place in an advanced internship visual studies course at our university. In order to ensure that students value reflective practice, our intervention was embedded into the fabric of the course so that it could provide a “real world” experience for students. We developed and delivered a lesson/workshop on the merits of deep reflection (Brookfield, 1995; Harvey, Coulson, & McMaugh, 2016; and Smith, 2011) and how this practice is necessary to encourage deeper learning (Ghaye, 2011). Our discussion will focus on providing a methodology for how to encourage deep reflection through the use of a course embedded workshop that provides students with a set of tools to facilitate their engagement with deep reflection. We will also outline how linking the reflective exercises to discipline specific concepts/activities will not only encourage deeper reflection but will allow for the transformative experience that is sought in an experiential learning curriculum (Ghaye, 2011). Brookfield, S. D. (1995). Becoming a critically reflective teacher. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Ghaye, T. (2011). Teaching and learning through reflective practice: a practical guide for positive action (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. Harvey, M., Coulson, D., & McMaugh, A. (2016). Towards a theory of the Ecology of Reflection: Reflective practice for experiential learning in higher education. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice. 13(2): http://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol13/iss2/2 Smith, E. (2011). Teaching critical reflection. Teaching in Higher Education 16(2) pgs.211-223.
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Accepted manuscript for Acadia, S. and Fjellestad, M., eds., 2020. Routledge International Handbook of Library and Information Studies for Arctic Social Sciences and Humanities. An earlier version of this chapter was presented at the 9th International Congress of Arctic Social Sciences (ICASS-IX), 8-12 June 2017, Umeå, Sweden. The presentation has been archived in the University of Calgary repository at: https://prism.ucalgary.ca/handle/1880/52147.,Cataloguers apply subject headings at the time they catalogue an item. As such, newer, contemporary terms used now to describe Indigenous Peoples and cultures differ from older, historical terminology of the past. This chapter analyses appropriate contemporary and historical controlled vocabulary including Canadian Subject Headings (CSH) and indexes for case law from 1892, as well as the legal literature indexes used in Canadian legal research. Changes in library subject headings and legal index taxonomy reflect changes in social norms, database practices, legal definitions, and various jurisdictions of Indigenous Peoples, including those located in Arctic Canada. Vernacular changes for subject headings were faster to shift for the collective term describing Indigenous Peoples in Arctic Canada, Inuit who were originally called Eskimo, when compared with other Aboriginal populations, notably First Nations, originally called Indian, and Métis. Contemporary researchers of Inuit Peoples and culture are encouraged to adapt search strategies that reflect both historical and contemporary terminology to effectively retrieve relevant database results across time even when outdated search terms must be used.,
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Trending discourses in post-secondary student health are relevant to the practice of counselling psychologists. Over the past decade, conversations on well-being have been dominated by mental health issues as if we are looking at health with a high-resolution zoom-focus instead of a wide-angled lens. The focus on mental health was necessary, but research is showing that we need to reconnect mental health with its physical, social, spiritual, and intellectual relatives. Further health areas like career development, engagement, and identity also need to be added back into the frame. Career development can be understood as a unique health construct in its own right and is especially relevant to the post-secondary sector. The association between student engagement and success has been well studied, and the link with overall well-being is being uncovered. There has been a corresponding call for institutions to dismantle colonization practices and create opportunities for active citizenry among the student populace. Identity constructs are also being linked with health, including intersectionality, fluidity, and non-binary facets. Developments in each of these domains challenge the status quo of what it means to be healthy, and pulling back from the singular focus on mental health will allow the complete picture of student health to come into view. Psychologists working with this dynamic population are invited to consider how these shifts in the health conversation impact their counselling practice.
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Leadership is one of the most essential determinants of success in organizations. Strong and adaptable leadership is particularly important in postsecondary settings due to an increasingly complex and dynamic social, economic and policy context. There is no literature concerning department chairs originating in western Canada, and what is available, predominantly from the United States, indicates that most postsecondary intuitions do not provide formal training to department chairs. This area of research is important because the actions of department chairs can dramatically affect a university’s effectiveness and productivity. The study explores how faculty members in the role of department chair at a publicly-funded Canadian university experience leadership development. It also examines department heads’ perceptions about the efficacy of leadership development programs available to them. The epistemological stance that guides the study is constructionism, which recognizes that knowledge is uniquely constructed by each individual and that learning is contextual and occurs through creative experimentation. A case study design is being used and interviews with faculty members who are currently in the role of department chair will be conducted until saturation is reached.
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Selected Proceedings From The Canadian Counselling Psychology Conference 2018: Advocating For Ourselves, Advocating For Our Communities; Canadian Counselling Psychology Into the Next Decade and Beyond
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The fossil fuel industry has propelled Alberta’s economy for decades, however periods of prosperity are often followed by low oil prices. With the world striving for low carbon energy solutions, tradespeople must equip themselves with skills to adapt to evolving socio-economic and environmental conditions. Iron & Earth is an NGO committed to empowering fossil fuel workers and Indigenous people to diversify Canada’s energy mix through retraining workshops. This research investigates optimal locations to deliver solar installation workshops by utilizing a weighting matrix using 4 parameters: proximity to utility solar projects, transitioning coal communities, Indigenous populations, and absent training opportunities. Additionally, Alberta’s capacity for new solar workers is explored and the impact of these workshops is measured. Results suggest that there is no perfect area that completely satisfies all 4 parameters however, many rural counties are identified that would be attractive for Iron & Earth to approach to best serve Albertans.
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The author introduces rural communities in post-Genocide Rwanda, where needs for interpersonal and psychosocial reconciliation between survivors and perpetrators of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsis are grave. The author illuminates unintended yet common side effects of forgiveness-seeking as a method of interpersonal reconciliation, including the dignity injuries this approach has brought to survivors. An overview of an alternative approach to interpersonal reconciliation, termed Action-Based Psychosocial Reconciliation Approach, will be introduced along with its conceptual-empirical foundations and beneficial effects. The second half of the paper discusses the author’s personal reflections on how his training in the context of Canadian counselling psychology has shaped and continues to guide his ongoing work supporting community psychosocial reconciliation in Rwanda. The author shares his views on the relational signature of the counselling psychological approach, its applied nature, a directionality of scholarship, its harmonious fit with the field of mental health services research and praxiological epistemology, and ethicality of engagements. The author concludes with a call to fellow Canadian counselling psychologists for their active participation in international/global endeavours.
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