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  • Sound recordings cited in "Audio Textual: Modernism, Sound Recordings, and Networks of Reception", a dissertation submitted by Brandon Walsh in November 2015 to the UVA English department. The dissertation is available at https://doi.org/10.18130/V3R27G
    Data Types:
    • Other
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  • Over the past two decades, severe mounta in pine beetle (MPB) outbreaks have affected several million hectares of forest in western North America. The extensive ecological and economic damage caused by widespread insect infestations make understanding the development and spread of MPB outbreaks critical. This study uses a time series of Landsat5 TM and Landsat7 ETM + images to map the spread of mortality due to MPB infestation in Arapaho–Roosevelt National Forest, Colorado, between 2003 and 2010. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and change in the Normalized Difference Moisture Index (NDMI) were used to classify red attack and non-red attack stands based on a maximum likelihood algorithm with manually selected training classes. The classification was validated by comparison with independent interpretations of aerial photography and high-resolution satellite imagery. The classification had good agreement (84.5–90.5% total accuracy). Cluster analysis for time series showed infestations originating in several different locations on the landscape early in the time series and subsequent infestations likely represent a combination of dispersal from outbreak populations and independent population growth. Analysis using conditional inference trees suggested that a combination of forest composition, topography, and dispersal predicted the distribution of MPB infestation on the landscape and that the importance of these variables changed as the outbreak developed. In early years, red attack was associated with forest and topographic characteristics known to influence susceptibility to MPB. Over time, beetle pressure became an increasingly important predictor of red attack, but in later years host tree availability played an important role in outbreak spread. If this pattern occurs consistently in MPB outbreaks, knowledge of these patterns could aid managers in targeting their efforts to reduce damage resulting from MPB outbreaks.
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Image
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    • Dataset
    • Document
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  • Minimal anonymized data set for replication of study findings
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
    • Text
  • 39,264 IDs for tweets related to the Charlottesville KKK rally on July 8, 2017. These tweet IDs matched a search for 'Charlottesville KKK OR #charlottesvilleKKK OR #blocKKK or #blocKKKparty'. These tweet IDs were collected with the twarc command line tool from Documenting the Now. Using twarc's hydrate command, researchers can retrieve the full content of those tweets—with additional metadata provided by Twitter's API—provided the tweets still exist.
    Data Types:
    • Dataset
    • Text
  • As humanities scholars increasingly recognize the value of public engagement, and as the proportion of tenure-track faculty positions available to new graduates continues to decline, many humanities programs are focusing renewed attention on equipping graduate students for careers as scholars both within and beyond academe. To support those efforts, the Scholarly Communication Institute has carried out a study investigating perceptions about career preparation provided by humanities graduate programs. The survey results help to create a more solid foundation on which to base curricular reform and new initiatives by moving the conversation about varied career paths from anecdote to data. The study consisted of two main phases: one public, one confidential. The first phase involved creating an exploratory public database of self-identified alternative academic practitioners. The database was built within the framework of the #Alt-Academy project (http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/alt-ac/) in order to leverage the energy of existing conversations. The second phase comprised two confidential surveys. The primary survey targeted people with advanced humanities degrees who self-identify as working in alternative academic careers, while a second targeted employers that oversee employees with advanced humanities degrees. Because we were working with a somewhat nebulous population, our subsequent distribution focused on “opt-in” strategies—especially social media, listervs, and traditional media coverage. While this method has limitations, we hoped to learn something not only from the content of the responses, but from the number and type of respondents. The data obtained through this study represents an important step towards identifying and understanding the career preparation needs of humanities graduate students by examining particular issues facing the increasingly visible and vocal population of humanities graduates in alternative academic careers. Equipping graduate students with the skills and literacies needed for 21st century scholarly work—from technical fluency to an understanding of organizational structures—is critical to ensuring continued rigorous and creative research, scholarship, and teaching.
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
    • Document
    • Text
  • As humanities scholars increasingly recognize the value of public engagement, and as the proportion of tenure-track faculty positions available to new graduates continues to decline, many humanities programs are focusing renewed attention on equipping graduate students for careers as scholars both within and beyond academe. To support those efforts, the Scholarly Communication Institute has carried out a study investigating perceptions about career preparation provided by humanities graduate programs. The survey results help to create a more solid foundation on which to base curricular reform and new initiatives by moving the conversation about varied career paths from anecdote to data. The study consisted of two main phases: one public, one confidential. The first phase involved creating an exploratory public database of self-identified alternative academic practitioners. The database was built within the framework of the #Alt-Academy project (http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/alt-ac/) in order to leverage the energy of existing conversations. The second phase comprised two confidential surveys. The primary survey targeted people with advanced humanities degrees who self-identify as working in alternative academic careers, while a second targeted employers that oversee employees with advanced humanities degrees. Because we were working with a somewhat nebulous population, our subsequent distribution focused on “opt-in” strategies—especially social media, listervs, and traditional media coverage. While this method has limitations, we hoped to learn something not only from the content of the responses, but from the number and type of respondents. The data obtained through this study represents an important step towards identifying and understanding the career preparation needs of humanities graduate students by examining particular issues facing the increasingly visible and vocal population of humanities graduates in alternative academic careers. Equipping graduate students with the skills and literacies needed for 21st century scholarly work—from technical fluency to an understanding of organizational structures—is critical to ensuring continued rigorous and creative research, scholarship, and teaching.
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
    • Document
    • Text
  • We examined naming authority and author name clustering in academic works. Specifically, we focused on a collection of reports from the University of Virginia’s Computer Science Department. Our research yielded a test list of names and a resulting file that correctly groups names referring to the same author, to the best of our knowledge
    Data Types:
    • Dataset
    • Document
    • Text
  • This data set contains geochemical data collected from samples of the Daviess 873 core from Daviess County, Indiana, USA. The 5 meter core interval spans the Selmier and Morgan Trail members of the New Albany Shale. The formation boundary represents the Frasnian/Famennian boundary in the Late Devonian Illinois Basin. Elemental data collected include total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), total sulfide sulfur (TS), and reactive iron (Fe reactive). Stable isotope data include (delta)13C of organic carbon, (delta)15N of total nitrogen, and (delta)34S of sulfide sulfur. The degree of pyritization of reactive Fe (DOP) was calculated. Molar element ratios TOC/TN, TOC/TP, and TOC/TS are provided.
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
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    • Text
  • The main ANSYS CFX file is attached. The code was used to produce cycle-averaged thrust and input power coefficients for a pitching foil with NACA 0012.
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
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    • Dataset
    • Text
  • Luteinizing hormone (LH) is synthesized and secreted throughout the reproductive cycle from gonadotrope cells in the anterior pituitary, and is required for steroidogenesis and ovulation. LH contains an α-subunit common with FSH, and a unique LHβ subunit that defines biological activity. Basal LHß transcription is low and stimulated by hypothalamic GnRH, which induces synthesis of early growth response protein-1 (Egr1), and stimulates binding of transcription factors Egr1 and sterodogenic factor-1 (SF1) on the promoter. WT1 (Wilms tumor protein1) is a zinc finger transcription factor with an essential role in urogenital system development, and which regulates several reproductive genes via interactions with SF1 or binding to GC-rich elements such as Egr1 binding sites. We investigated a potential role for WT1 in LHβ transcription in clonal mouse gonadotrope LβT2 cells. WT1 was present in LβT2 and mouse pituitary cells, and protein bound to the endogenous LH promoter. Interestingly, mRNAs for WT1, which contains a three amino-acid insertion between the 3rd and 4th zinc fingers, and the WT1 (-KTS) variant were both expressed at significant levels. WT1 mRNAs and protein were decreased approximately 50% by GnRH treatment, under conditions where Egr1 mRNA and protein, and LHß transcription, were stimulated. Decreasing expression of mRNA for WT1 (-KTS) decreased stimulation of LHß and Egr1 by GnRH, whereas decreasing both WT1 (- KTS) and (KTS) increased endogenous LH transcription, and prevented LH but not Egr1 stimulation by GnRH, suggesting differing biological activities for the WT1 isoforms. Overexpression of WT1 showed that WT1 enhanced LHß promoter GnRH stimulation 2-to-3-fold and required the 3’Egr1 site, but WT1 repressed both basal and GnRH-stimulated LHβ promoter activity by approximately 70%. Our data suggest that WT1 can modulate LHβ transcription, with differential roles for the two WT1 variants; WT1 (-KTS) enhances and WT1 (KTS) suppresses transcription
    Data Types:
    • Slides
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    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
    • Document
    • Text