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  • Abstract: Lake Teletskoye (spanning 51°20′ to 51°47′N and 87°15′ to 87°50′E) is the largest lake in the Altai Mountains and is 77 km long and 330 m deep.The core location (51°44.99′N, 87°37.414′E) was at the deepest part of the lake. The altitude of the mountains surrounding the lake is 1900 m a.s.l. on average. Due to higher annual precipitation at the area, the steppe belt is absencent but it occurs, at least fragmentarily, in other parts of the mountains. Only very small patches along the lakeshore represent steppe-like vegetation. Birch forests mixed with meadows occur at lower altitudes, up to 700 m a.s.l. Unique evergreen (so-called 'dark') coniferous forest grow between 700 and 1700ma.s.l. The mountains above 1700 m are covered by Siberian pine (Pinus sibirica) forest. Above the tree line, at about 1800 m, alpine tundra and alpine meadow communities are widespread. Dating was complicated by the absence of plant macrofossils in the sediments and low bulk TOC. To obtain a more reliable chronology, the 210Pb activity and 137Cs content were also analysed. For more details see Rudaya et al., 2016. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: Not Available
    Data Types:
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  • Abstract: Open pit exploitation of the Kirki high sulfidation epithermal deposit (Thrace, NE Greece) resulted in the formation of an acidic pit lake by infilling of the open cast by rain and draining waters after mine closure. Three case specific PHREEQC geochemical models were developed including "Direct Precipitation", "Evaporation", and "Mixing with Rain water" in order to simulate the environmental conditions through the year, and to investigate the behavior of the acidic and rich in heavy metals waters of the pit-lake. Scanning Electron Microscopy examination revealed the predominance of jarosite species and goethite in the mineral precipitate, followed by lower amounts of hematite, schwertmannite and anglesite. According to PHREEQC modeling, jarosite species formation is favored during both dry and wet periods, while the presence of schwertmannite, goethite, hematite and anglesite depicts the fluctuation of the physicochemical conditions through the year. These phases play a key role in controlling the As and Pb dissolved concentrations, mainly through adsorption and co-precipitation, whereas the soluble metals Zn, Cd and Mn remain dissolved. The current status of the Kirki open pit system is the most stable for the environment, therefore a case-specific remediation plan focused on both the protection of the environment and the preservation of the Kirki open pit is proposed. The socio-economic benefits of such an approach could include increased tourist numbers due to case-oriented tourism, enhancement of local economy, education, whereas this approach is also cost effective relative to other proposed remediation measures. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: * LATITUDE START: 41.014460 * LONGITUDE START: 25.812440 * LATITUDE END: 41.021320 * LONGITUDE END: 25.826800 * LOCATION: Greece * METHOD/DEVICE: Multiple investigations
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  • Abstract: This dataset is constituted by historical vertical profiles of temperature and salinity from the former Centro de Oceanografia da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa (CO-FCUL, now MARE-FCUL). The profiles were gathered during 42 campaigns (1978-2007) conducted by CO-FCUL or international institutions where CO-FCUL researchers were participants. The dataset was constructed, and used, for the work of Valente et al. (2019). Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: Not Available
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
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  • Abstract: Arctic snowfall climatology produced from the version R05 of the CloudSat 2C-SNOW-PROFILE product is available. It covers the 2007-2010 period over the latitudes from 58.5°N to 82°S. The monthly snowfall rates in this file have been calculated using the observations with: - a snow retrieval status lower than 3 - and a snowfall rate surface confidence > 1 Additionnaly, the monthly surface snowfall rate uncertainties, number of CloudSat orbits as well as number of observations are available. The number of observations over these 4 years is not sufficient to consider snowfall rates monthly (Edel et al. 2020). If one wants to obtain monthly snowfall rates, it is necessary to average multiple years. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: * LATITUDE: 90.000000 * LONGITUDE: 0.000000 * LOCATION: Arctic
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
  • Abstract: In this experiment, we assessed the different transmission steps from the first to the second intermediate host: i) cercarial emergence from periwinkles, ii) cercarial activity and survival after emergence, iii) cercarial infectivity in mussels, and iv) susceptibility of mussels to cercarial infection. For iii) cercariae were treated but not the mussels, whereas for iv) mussels were treated but not the cercariae. The experiment was run in August-September 2017 in the climate chambers of GEOMAR in Kiel. All experiments were conducted using temperature and salinity (fully crossed) as well as time (only for cercarial output) as fixed factors, and periwinkle/mussel identity nested within water bath as random factor. Temperature levels applied were 19 and 23°C. Salinity levels applied were 13, 16 and 19. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: Not Available
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
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  • Abstract: The Late Neogene witnessed various major paleoceanographic changes that culminated in intense Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG). The cause and effects of these changes are still debated. We use a multiproxy approach to determine the relative timing of the closure of the Panama gateway, changes in Atlantic circulation, global cooling and ice sheet growth. Benthic foraminiferal Mg/Ca records from a Pacific and an Atlantic Site have been produced and are interpreted in terms of bottom water temperatures. These Mg-temperature records are combined with published benthic d13C, N18O and erosion records to reconstruct the flow of proto-North Atlantic Deep Water (proto-NADW) over the past 12 Ma. The results suggest that between 12.5and 10.5 Ma, and again between about 8.5 and 6 Ma, a nutrient-depleted water mass that was colder (by 1-2˚C) and fresher than the intervening deep water mass filled the Atlantic basin. This proto-NADW became warmer (by ~1˚C) and saltier between 6 and 5Ma, coincident with the restriction of surface water flow through the Central American Seaway. The Mg-temperature records define a subsequent global cooling trend of~3.5˚C between 5 Ma and today. Early NHG in the late Miocene was perhaps related to the formation of the relatively cold, fresh proto-NADW. The formation of the warmer and saltier proto-NADW in the early Pliocene may have initially limited Northern Hemisphere ice growth. However, the increased moisture released at high northern latitudes associated with formation of 'warm' proto-NADW, coupled with the global temperature decrease of deep (and hence polar surface) waters, likely helped initiate the intense NHG of the Plio-Pleistocene. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: Not Available
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
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  • Abstract: A deep-sea temperature record for the past 50 million years has been produced from the magnesium/calcium ratio (Mg/Ca) in benthic foraminiferal calcite. The record is strikingly similar in form to the corresponding benthic oxygen isotope (δ18O) record and defines an overall cooling of about 12°C in the deep oceans with four main cooling periods. Used in conjunction with the benthic δ18O record, the magnesium temperature record indicates that the first major accumulation of Antarctic ice occurred rapidly in the earliest Oligocene (34 million years ago) and was not accompanied by a decrease in deep-sea temperatures. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: Not Available
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    • Tabular Data
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  • Abstract: Paired benthic foraminiferal trace metal and stable isotope records have been constructed from equatorial Pacific Ocean Drilling Program Site 1218. The records include the two largest abrupt (<1 Myr) increases in the Cenozoic benthic oxygen isotope record: Oi‐1 in the earliest Oligocene (∼34 Ma) and Mi‐1 in the earliest Miocene (∼23 Ma). The paired Mg/Ca and oxygen isotope records are used to calculate seawater δ18O (δw). Calculated δw suggests that a large Antarctic ice sheet formed during Oi‐1 and subsequently fluctuated throughout the Oligocene on both short (<0.5 Myr) and long (2–3 Myr) timescales, between about 50 and 100% of its maximum earliest Oligocene size. The magnitudes of these fluctuations are consistent with estimates of sea level derived from sequence stratigraphy. The transient expansion of the Antarctic ice sheet at Mi‐1 is marked in the benthic δ18O record by two positive excursions between 23.7 and 22.9 Ma, each with a duration of 200–300 kyr. Bottom water temperatures decreased by ∼2°C over the 150 kyr immediately prior to both rapid δ18O excursions. However, the onset of each of these phases of ice growth is synchronous, within the resolution of the records, with the onset of a 2°C warming over ∼150 kyr. We suggest that the warming during these glacial expansions reflect increased greenhouse forcing prompted by a sudden decrease in global chemical weathering rates as Antarctic basement silicate rocks became blanketed by an ice sheet. This represents a negative feedback process that might have operated during major abrupt growth phases of the Antarctic ice sheet. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: When using these data please cite: Lear et al. 2004. This workbook includes both the raw isotope data and the screened data (=raw data minus a handful of fliers, that we attribute to a failing collector on the mass spec) (see text in paper for definition of "fliers“). Please note that for δ13C, in Figure 3 of the paper, a few fliers were included. Therefore to reproduce Figure 3B, the column "δ13C plotted Lear et al 04" will need to be used. In all other cases please use "δ13C screened". To reproduce Figure 3A please use "δ18O screened Lear et al 04“. Coverage: Not Available
    Data Types:
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  • Abstract: Not Available Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: Not Available
    Data Types:
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  • Abstract: Concentration and relative abundances of planktonic foraminifera in plankton tows and surface sediments of the the Barents Sea, from 69°50,686 N to 75°36,095 N. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: Not Available
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
    • Text