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This 11-part series features stories from sites of memory in Canada related to the First World War. Conversation kits that include discussion questions and activities for students and the public, along with web links and ideas for additional resources are available for each story and accessible online. Please note, each vignette opens with 20 seconds of silence.,Harry Ferguson was a Lieutenant in the 26th Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force. On Saturday, June 12, 1915, Harry and his fellow soldiers marched through the city of Saint John, New Brunswick. It was their send-off before they left for battle overseas. They marched from the Barrack Green Armoury to the wharf where their ship, the Caledonia, was waiting. Crowds of civilians lined the streets, cheering and waving farewell as the brass bands played. Crowds assembled again the following morning as the Caledonia departed, loaded with soldiers. Lieutenant Harry Ferguson called the fanfare “an inspiring sight.,Funded by Government of Canada and Royal Roads University, the two-part documentary series comprises 27 short stories exploring sites of memory across the country linked with the First and Second World Wars. Dr. Geoffrey Bird directed and produced the documentary. The documentary series explores sites of memory that offer insight into our nation’s past. These stories connect and engage us in a new way, looking at the war not from the perspective of battlefields overseas but from places in Canada that were shaped by war. The history is recounted by ‘guardians of remembrance,’ historians, guides and storytellers who offer insight into what happened and why. The documentary provides a gateway to new insights into the significance of this heritage as well as an opportunity to commemorate this shared national experience.,
Data Types:
  • Video
This 11-part series features stories from sites of memory in Canada related to the First World War. Conversation kits that include discussion questions and activities for students and the public, along with web links and ideas for additional resources are available for each story and accessible online. Please note, each vignette opens with 20 seconds of silence.,On Parliament Hill, at the heart of the Peace Tower, is a sanctuary created for remembrance and reflection. The Memorial Chamber was originally designed and dedicated to the Canadians who died during the First World War. Today this space of honour pays tribute to all military personnel who died in service to Canada.,Funded by Government of Canada and Royal Roads University, the two-part documentary series comprises 27 short stories exploring sites of memory across the country linked with the First and Second World Wars. Dr. Geoffrey Bird directed and produced the documentary. The documentary series explores sites of memory that offer insight into our nation’s past. These stories connect and engage us in a new way, looking at the war not from the perspective of battlefields overseas but from places in Canada that were shaped by war. The history is recounted by ‘guardians of remembrance,’ historians, guides and storytellers who offer insight into what happened and why. The documentary provides a gateway to new insights into the significance of this heritage as well as an opportunity to commemorate this shared national experience.,
Data Types:
  • Video
This 16-part series features stories from sites of memory in Canada related to the Second World War. Conversation kits that include discussion questions and activities for students and the public, along with web links and ideas for additional resources are available for each story and accessible online. Please note, each vignette opens with 20 seconds of silence.,As a young teenager, Mennonite conscientious objector, Don Regier, read the book, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, by Harriet Beecher Stowe, which solidified his belief that war could never be justified. When called to fight in the Second World War, Regier could not agree to pick up arms, no matter how great the cause.,Funded by Government of Canada and Royal Roads University, the two-part documentary series comprises 27 short stories exploring sites of memory across the country linked with the First and Second World Wars. Dr. Geoffrey Bird directed and produced the documentary. The documentary series explores sites of memory that offer insight into our nation’s past. These stories connect and engage us in a new way, looking at the war not from the perspective of battlefields overseas but from places in Canada that were shaped by war. The history is recounted by ‘guardians of remembrance,’ historians, guides and storytellers who offer insight into what happened and why. The documentary provides a gateway to new insights into the significance of this heritage as well as an opportunity to commemorate this shared national experience.,
Data Types:
  • Video
This 11-part series features stories from sites of memory in Canada related to the First World War. Conversation kits that include discussion questions and activities for students and the public, along with web links and ideas for additional resources are available for each story and accessible online. Please note, each vignette opens with 20 seconds of silence.,During the First World War, Canada was part of the British Empire and fought with Britain against Germany, Austria-Hungary, the Ottoman Empire and Bulgaria. These four countries were known as the Central Powers. The Canadian government considered recent immigrants from these enemy nations to be a threat to Canada. This means that many people who had recently moved to Canada were considered enemies. Although they had never committed a crime, more than 8,500 of these “enemy aliens” were imprisoned in 24 different internment camps across Canada. In the camps, the internees did hard labour in very poor living conditions away from their homes, friends, and often their families.,Funded by Government of Canada and Royal Roads University, the two-part documentary series comprises 27 short stories exploring sites of memory across the country linked with the First and Second World Wars. Dr. Geoffrey Bird directed and produced the documentary. The documentary series explores sites of memory that offer insight into our nation’s past. These stories connect and engage us in a new way, looking at the war not from the perspective of battlefields overseas but from places in Canada that were shaped by war. The history is recounted by ‘guardians of remembrance,’ historians, guides and storytellers who offer insight into what happened and why. The documentary provides a gateway to new insights into the significance of this heritage as well as an opportunity to commemorate this shared national experience.,
Data Types:
  • Video
This 11-part series features stories from sites of memory in Canada related to the First World War. Conversation kits that include discussion questions and activities for students and the public, along with web links and ideas for additional resources are available for each story and accessible online. Please note, each vignette opens with 20 seconds of silence.,Funded by Government of Canada and Royal Roads University, the two-part documentary series comprises 27 short stories exploring sites of memory across the country linked with the First and Second World Wars. Dr. Geoffrey Bird directed and produced the documentary. The documentary series explores sites of memory that offer insight into our nation’s past. These stories connect and engage us in a new way, looking at the war not from the perspective of battlefields overseas but from places in Canada that were shaped by war. The history is recounted by ‘guardians of remembrance,’ historians, guides and storytellers who offer insight into what happened and why. The documentary provides a gateway to new insights into the significance of this heritage as well as an opportunity to commemorate this shared national experience.,
Data Types:
  • Video
This 16-part series features stories from sites of memory in Canada related to the Second World War. Conversation kits that include discussion questions and activities for students and the public, along with web links and ideas for additional resources are available for each story and accessible online. Please note, each vignette opens with 20 seconds of silence.,Across Canada, lists of names are carefully carved into memorials. Russell McConnell is such a name and researching his story and those of others allows us to reveal who these men and women are, and what we might share in common with them. Sub Lieutenant McConnell was serving with the Royal Canadian Volunteer Naval Reserve was aboard Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Raccoon when the ship was torpedoed by a German U-boat on September 7, 1942. Today Russell’s name is found at a number of sites across Canada. These include the cenotaph at Royal Roads University, the Sailors Memorial in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and at Forillon National Park in Gaspé, Quebec.,Funded by Government of Canada and Royal Roads University, the two-part documentary series comprises 27 short stories exploring sites of memory across the country linked with the First and Second World Wars. Dr. Geoffrey Bird directed and produced the documentary. The documentary series explores sites of memory that offer insight into our nation’s past. These stories connect and engage us in a new way, looking at the war not from the perspective of battlefields overseas but from places in Canada that were shaped by war. The history is recounted by ‘guardians of remembrance,’ historians, guides and storytellers who offer insight into what happened and why. The documentary provides a gateway to new insights into the significance of this heritage as well as an opportunity to commemorate this shared national experience.,
Data Types:
  • Video
This 11-part series features stories from sites of memory in Canada related to the First World War. Conversation kits that include discussion questions and activities for students and the public, along with web links and ideas for additional resources are available for each story and accessible online. Please note, each vignette opens with 20 seconds of silence.,In 1917, more than 22,000 Polish volunteers came to Niagara-on-the-Lake in Ontario to train for the First World War. These men were special because although most of them were Polish immigrants, they lived in the United States, and were trained in Canada to prepare to join the French army. Their experience highlights how the First World War was a truly international effort.,Funded by Government of Canada and Royal Roads University, the two-part documentary series comprises 27 short stories exploring sites of memory across the country linked with the First and Second World Wars. Dr. Geoffrey Bird directed and produced the documentary. The documentary series explores sites of memory that offer insight into our nation’s past. These stories connect and engage us in a new way, looking at the war not from the perspective of battlefields overseas but from places in Canada that were shaped by war. The history is recounted by ‘guardians of remembrance,’ historians, guides and storytellers who offer insight into what happened and why. The documentary provides a gateway to new insights into the significance of this heritage as well as an opportunity to commemorate this shared national experience.,
Data Types:
  • Video
This 16-part series features stories from sites of memory in Canada related to the Second World War. Conversation kits that include discussion questions and activities for students and the public, along with web links and ideas for additional resources are available for each story and accessible online. Please note, each vignette opens with 20 seconds of silence.,Funded by Government of Canada and Royal Roads University, the two-part documentary series comprises 27 short stories exploring sites of memory across the country linked with the First and Second World Wars. Dr. Geoffrey Bird directed and produced the documentary. The documentary series explores sites of memory that offer insight into our nation’s past. These stories connect and engage us in a new way, looking at the war not from the perspective of battlefields overseas but from places in Canada that were shaped by war. The history is recounted by ‘guardians of remembrance,’ historians, guides and storytellers who offer insight into what happened and why. The documentary provides a gateway to new insights into the significance of this heritage as well as an opportunity to commemorate this shared national experience.,
Data Types:
  • Video
This 16-part series features stories from sites of memory in Canada related to the Second World War. Conversation kits that include discussion questions and activities for students and the public, along with web links and ideas for additional resources are available for each story and accessible online. Please note, each vignette opens with 20 seconds of silence.,William Lyon Mackenzie King was Canada’s longest-serving Prime Minister. He led Canada for a total of twenty-one years over three terms: 1921-26, 1926-30 and 1935-48. King conducted most of his parliamentary work from his library on the third floor of his home. Today, visitors can tour the library exactly as it was during King’s lifetime, and discover clues about the man who led Canada through the aftermath of the First World War, the Great Depression, and the Second World War.,Funded by Government of Canada and Royal Roads University, the two-part documentary series comprises 27 short stories exploring sites of memory across the country linked with the First and Second World Wars. Dr. Geoffrey Bird directed and produced the documentary. The documentary series explores sites of memory that offer insight into our nation’s past. These stories connect and engage us in a new way, looking at the war not from the perspective of battlefields overseas but from places in Canada that were shaped by war. The history is recounted by ‘guardians of remembrance,’ historians, guides and storytellers who offer insight into what happened and why. The documentary provides a gateway to new insights into the significance of this heritage as well as an opportunity to commemorate this shared national experience.,
Data Types:
  • Video
This 11-part series features stories from sites of memory in Canada related to the First World War. Conversation kits that include discussion questions and activities for students and the public, along with web links and ideas for additional resources are available for each story and accessible online. Please note, each vignette opens with 20 seconds of silence.,During the First World War, thousands of Canadian men went overseas to fight. These men left their lives and jobs behind. Many Canadian women went to work to fill the jobs left by the men. For some of these women, it was the first time they had ever worked outside the home. These Canadian women supported the war effort in many ways, including by working in factories. One of these factories was the Dominion Arsenal, where they had to fill ammunition cartridges for the battlefield.,Funded by Government of Canada and Royal Roads University, the two-part documentary series comprises 27 short stories exploring sites of memory across the country linked with the First and Second World Wars. Dr. Geoffrey Bird directed and produced the documentary. The documentary series explores sites of memory that offer insight into our nation’s past. These stories connect and engage us in a new way, looking at the war not from the perspective of battlefields overseas but from places in Canada that were shaped by war. The history is recounted by ‘guardians of remembrance,’ historians, guides and storytellers who offer insight into what happened and why. The documentary provides a gateway to new insights into the significance of this heritage as well as an opportunity to commemorate this shared national experience.,
Data Types:
  • Video