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simulation data from lattice phase-oscillator model part 2... simulation data from lattice phase-oscillator model part 4... simulation data from lattice phase-oscillator model part 5... simulation data from lattice phase-oscillator model part 6... gamma oscillation... Matlab Code of a ring-shaped phase-oscillator model (Fig.6)
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Recently, we reported evidence for a novel mechanism of peripheral sensory coding based on oscillatory synchrony. Spontaneously oscillating electroreceptors in weakly electric fish (Mormyridae) respond to electrosensory stimuli with a phase reset that results in transient synchrony across the receptor population (Baker et al., 2015). Here, we asked whether the central electrosensory system actually detects the occurrence of synchronous oscillations among receptors. We found that electrosensory stimulation elicited evoked potentials in the midbrain exterolateral nucleus at a short latency following receptor synchronization. Frequency tuning in the midbrain resembled peripheral frequency tuning, which matches the intrinsic oscillation frequencies of the receptors. These frequencies are lower than those in individual conspecific signals, and instead match those found in collective signals produced by groups of conspecifics. Our results provide further support for a novel mechanism for sensory coding based on the detection of oscillatory synchrony among peripheral receptors.
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Gamma-band synchronization coordinates brief periods of excitability in oscillating neuronal populations to optimize information transmission during sensation and cognition. Commonly, a stable, shared frequency over time is considered a condition for functional neural synchronization. Here, we demonstrate the opposite: instantaneous frequency modulations are critical to regulate phase relations and synchronization. In monkey visual area V1, nearby local populations driven by different visual stimulation showed different gamma frequencies. When similar enough, these frequencies continually attracted and repulsed each other, which enabled preferred phase relations to be maintained in periods of minimized frequency difference. Crucially, the precise dynamics of frequencies and phases across a wide range of stimulus conditions was predicted from a physics theory that describes how weakly coupled oscillators influence each other’s phase relations. Hence, the fundamental mathematical principle of synchronization through instantaneous frequency modulations applies to gamma in V1, and is likely generalizable to other brain regions and rhythms.
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Oscillation and noise filtration
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Flying insects use compensatory head movements to stabilize gaze. Like other optokinetic responses, these movements can reduce image displacement, motion, and misalignment, and simplify the optic flow field. Because gaze is imperfectly stabilized in insects, we hypothesised that compensatory head movements serve to extend the range of velocities of self-motion that the visual system encodes. We tested this by measuring head movements in hawkmoths Hyles lineata responding to full-field visual stimuli of differing oscillation amplitudes, oscillation frequencies, and spatial frequencies. We used frequency-domain system identification techniques to characterise the head's roll response, and simulated how this would have affected the output of the motion vision system, modelled as a computational array of Reichardt detectors. The moths' head movements were modulated to allow encoding of both fast and slow self-motion, effectively quadrupling the working range of the visual system for flight control. By using its own output to drive compensatory head movements, the motion vision system thereby works as an adaptive sensor, which will be most beneficial in nocturnal species with inherently slow vision. Studies of the ecology of motion vision must therefore consider the tuning of motion-sensitive interneurons in the context of the closed-loop systems in which they function.
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Dispersal in heterogeneous ecosystems, such as coastal metacommunities, is a major driver of diversity and productivity. According to theory, both species richness and spatial averaging shape a unimodal relationship of productivity with dispersal. We experimentally tested the hypothesis that disturbances acting on local patches would buffer the loss of productivity at high dispersal by preventing synchronized species oscillations. To simulate these disturbances, our experimental assemblages involved species that self-organized in isolation under three inflow pulsing frequencies, where hydraulic displacement and nutrient loading affected assemblage diversity and composition. At steady-state, the emerging isolated assemblages were connected at three levels of dispersal creating three metacommunities of different connectivity. Consistent with theory, as dispersal increased, species richness in the metacommunity declined; productivity however remained high. This occurred because the most productive species in our study (which dominated the isolated patch of intermediate inflow pulsing frequency) dominated all three patches (low, intermediate and high inflow pulsing frequencies) after dispersal commenced in our metacommunities. This experimental result provides empirical support for the mechanism of spatial averaging. Furthermore, disturbances, in the form of localized pulsed inflows, prevented population oscillation synchrony caused by homogenization. Overall, our observations suggest that localized environmental fluctuations and the identity of species seem to be more influential than dispersal in shaping the diversity and composition of phytoplankton assemblages and stabilizing productivity.
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transient rhythm / oscillation... beta rhythms / oscillations
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Datasets with results from all simulations of trajectories in 40 different conditions of oscillating optimum for d = 70.... Datasets with results from all simulations of trajectories in 40 different conditions of oscillating optimum for d = 40.... Dataset with the frequency of chaos at each simulation time point for different values of dimensionality (number of traits) d.
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Why did the London Millennium Bridge shake when there was a big enough crowd walking on it? What features of human walking dynamics when coupled to a shaky surface produce such shaking? Here, we use a simple biped model capable of walking stably in 3D to examine these questions. We simulate multiple such stable bipeds walking simultaneously on a bridge, showing that they naturally synchronize under certain conditions, but that synchronization is not required to shake the bridge. Under such shaking conditions, the simulated walkers increase their step-widths and expend more metabolic energy than when the bridge does not shake. We also find that such bipeds can walk stably on externally shaken treadmills, synchronizing with the treadmill motion for a range of oscillation amplitudes and frequencies, sometimes performing net positive work on the treadmill. Our simulations illustrate how interactions between (idealized) bipeds through the walking surface can produce emergent collective behavior that may not be exhibited by just a single biped.
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The high-frequency wing beat of higher-order insects is driven by self-sustained oscillations of constantly activated flight muscles. However, it remains unknown whether its underlying mechanism is based on flight muscle–specific features or on preexisting contractile functions. Here, we recorded x-ray diffraction movies, at a rate of 5000 frames per second, simultaneously from the two antagonistic flight muscles of bumblebees during wing beat. Signals that occurred at the right timing for triggering each wing-beat stroke were resolved in both muscles. The signals likely reflect stretch-induced myosin deformation, which would also enhance force in vertebrate muscles. The results suggest that insects use a refined preexisting force-enhancing mechanism for high-frequency wing beat, rather than developing a novel mechanism.
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