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Petition subject: Slave trade Original: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:13909150 Date of creation: (unknown) Selected signatures: William Bollan Total signatures: 1 Legal voter signatures (males not identified as non-legal): 1 Female only signatures: No Identifications of signatories: agent for Massachusetts Bay Prayer format was printed vs. manuscript: Manuscript Additional archivist notes: Commons of Great Britain in Parliament, foreign trade, duties, sugar, rum, molasses, British sugar colonies, British northern colonies, Indian and Guinea trade, British woolen and other manufactures, fishery, cod fish, fishermen, exports, imports, European markets, French, English, King Charles, Newfoundland, oyl, oil, Cape Breton expedition Location of the petition at the Massachusetts Archives of the Commonwealth: Massachusetts Archives volume 303, pages 267-267b Acknowledgements: Supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-5105612), Massachusetts Archives of the Commonwealth, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University, Institutional Development Initiative at Harvard University, and Harvard University Library.
Data Types:
  • Tabular Data
Do minority voters respond to co-racial or co-ethnic candidates? That is does the increased chance of substantive representation translate into increased participation? Here, we focus on this question among African American voters. While much of the empirical literature on this question has produced conflicting answers, recent studies suggest that minority candidates can significantly increase minority turnout. We argue that past work on this topic does not adequately account for the fact that minority voters in places with minority candidates may systematically differ in their level of participation than minority voters in places without minority candidates. In this study we address the weakness of previous research designs and offer a new design that exploits the redistricting process to gain additional leverage over this question. The redistricting process allows us to correctly model the selection process and ensure that voters who were moved to districts with African American candidates through the redistricting process are comparable to voters that remained in existing districts with white candidates. We find little evidence that African American voter turnout increases when voters are moved to African America candidates. We find some evidence that white voters, however, tend to vote at lower rates when they are represented by African American candidates.
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  • File Set
Petition subject: Support for individuals Original: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:13909149 Date of creation: 1786-03-06 Petition location: Uxbridge Selected signatures: Abner Taft Nathan Tyler Stephen Sibley Actions taken on dates: 1786-03-14 Legislative action: Examined and allowed on March 14, 1786 Total signatures: 3 Legislative action summary: Examined, allowed Legal voter signatures (males not identified as non-legal): 3 Female only signatures: No Identifications of signatories: selectmen of Uxbridge Prayer format was printed vs. manuscript: Manuscript Additional archivist notes: John Carter, Captain Edward Seagrave, Rhode Island, Seth Read, Worcester, Lancaster, New York Location of the petition at the Massachusetts Archives of the Commonwealth: Massachusetts Archives volume 303, pages 262-262b Acknowledgements: Supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-5105612), Massachusetts Archives of the Commonwealth, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University, Institutional Development Initiative at Harvard University, and Harvard University Library.
Data Types:
  • Tabular Data
This study reports the results of a multiyear program to predict direct executive elections in a variety of countries from globally pooled data.We developed prediction models by means of an election data set covering 86 countries and more than 500 elections, and a separate data set with extensive polling data from 146 election rounds.We also participated in two live forecasting experiments. Our models correctly predicted 80 to 90% of elections in out-of-sample tests. The results suggest that global elections can be successfully modeled and that they are likely to become more predictable as more information becomes available in future elections. The results provide strong evidence for the impact of political institutions and incumbent advantage. They also provide evidence to support contentions about the importance of international linkage and aid. Direct evidence for economic indicators as predictors of election outcomes is relatively weak. The results suggest that, with some adjustments, global polling is a robust predictor of election outcomes, even in developing states. Implications of these findings after the latest U.S. presidential election are discussed.
Data Types:
  • Other
  • Software/Code
  • Tabular Data
  • Document
  • Text
Replication data and code for JoP article.
Data Types:
  • Software/Code
  • Tabular Data
Contains .dta files and .do files to replicate all figures and tables in the manuscript and the online appendix.
Data Types:
  • Software/Code
  • Tabular Data
These data were collected in summer 2011 as part of project investigating clergy political attitudes in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.
Data Types:
  • Tabular Data
  • Document
Dataset for running Boosted regression with food inflation in India (FY91 - FY16) as dependent variable.
Data Types:
  • Tabular Data
Inadequate quantity and quality of livestock feed is a persistent constraint to productivity for mixed crop-livestock farming in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. To assess on-farm niches of improved forages, demonstration trials and participatory on-farm research were conducted in four different sites. Forage legumes included Canavalia brasiliensis (CIAT 17009), Stylosanthes guianensis (CIAT 11995) and Desmodium uncinatum (cv. Silverleaf), while grasses were Guatemala grass (Tripsacum andersonii), Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum) French Cameroon, and a local Napier line. Within the first six months, forage legumes adapted differently to the four sites with little differences among varieties, while forage grasses displayed higher variability in biomass production among varieties than among sites. Farmers’ ranking largely corresponded to herbage yield from the first cut, preferring Canavalia, Silverleaf desmodium and Napier French Cameroon. Choice of forages and integration into farming systems depended on land availability, soil erosion prevalence and livestock husbandry system. In erosion prone sites, 55–60%of farmers planted grasses on field edges and 16–30% as hedgerows for erosion control. 43% of farmers grew forages as intercrop with food crops such as maize and cassava, pointing to land scarcity. Only in the site with lower land pressure, 71% of farmers grew legumes as pure stand. When land tenure was not secured and livestock freely roaming, 75% of farmers preferred to grow annual forage legumes instead of perennial grasses. Future research should develop robust decision support for spatial and temporal integration of forage technologies into diverse smallholder cropping systems and agro-ecologies.
Data Types:
  • Tabular Data
This is replication data for "Differential effects of community health worker visits across social and economic groups in Uttar Pradesh, India: a link between social inequities and health disparities", International Journal for Equity in Health, to be published
Data Types:
  • Tabular Data