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  • 6-The electron oscillating period as functions of the temperature and the cyclotron frequency in triangular quantum dot qubit under an electric field.docx... Fig.4. A-Function relationship between the first excited state energy and the temperature and the electron-phonon coupling constant for different cyclotron frequencies and ,,,; B-Function relationship between the first excited energy and the temperature and the electric field strength for different cyclotron frequencies and ,,,; C-Function relationship between the first excited energy and the temperature and the confinement length for different cyclotron frequencies and ,,,; D-Function relationship between the first excited energy and of the temperature and the Coulomb impurity potential for different cyclotron frequencies and ,,,... Fig.1. A-Function relationship between the ground state energy and the temperature and the cyclotron frequency for different electron-phonon coupling constants and ,,, ; B-Function relationship between the ground state energy and the temperature and the cyclotron frequency for different electric field strengths and ,,,; C-Function relationship between the ground state energy and the temperature and the cyclotron frequency for different confinement lengths and ,,,; D-Function relationship between the ground state energy and the temperature and the cyclotron frequency for different Coulomb impurity potentials and ,,,... Fig.6. A-The electron oscillation period as functions of the temperature and the cyclotron frequency for different electron-phonon coupling constants and ,,,; B-The electron oscillation period as functions of the temperature and the cyclotron frequency for different electric field strengths and,,,; C-The electron oscillation period as functions of the temperature and the cyclotron frequency for different confinement lengths and ,,,; D-The electron oscillation period as functions of the temperature and the cyclotron frequency for different Coulomb impurity potentials and ,,,... 7-The electron oscillating period as functions of the temperature and the electron-phonon coupling constant and etc. in triangular quantum dot qubit under an electric field.docx... 2-The first excited state energy as functions of the temperature and the cyclotron frequency in triangular quantum dot qubit under an electric field.docx... 3-The ground state energy as functions of the temperature and the electron-phonon coupling constant and etc. in triangular quantum dot qubit under an electric field.docx... Fig.7. A-The electron oscillation period as functions of the temperature and the electron-phonon coupling constant for different cyclotron frequencies and ,,,; B-The electron oscillation period as functions of the temperature and the electric field strength for different cyclotron frequencies and ,,,; C-The electron oscillation period as functions of the temperature and the confinement length for different cyclotron frequencies and ,,,; D-The electron oscillation period as functions of the temperature and the Coulomb impurity potential for different cyclotron frequencies and ,,,... 1-The ground state energy as functions of the temperature and the cyclotron frequency in triangular quantum dot qubit under an electric field.docx... Fig.3. A-Function relationship between the ground state energy and the temperature and the electron-phonon coupling constant for different cyclotron frequencies and ,,,; B-Function relationship between the ground state energy and the temperature and the electric field strength for different cyclotron frequencies and ,,,; C-Function relationship between the ground state energy and of the temperature and the confinement length for different cyclotron frequencies and ,,,; D-Function relationship between the ground state energy and the temperature and the Coulomb impurity potential for different cyclotron frequencies and ,,,
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  • Forced Oscillations, All Data.xlsx... Oscillation... Frequency
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  • oscillations.... oscillating... oscillations
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  • Examples of simulations in the associated articles can be reproduced by adjusting the model parameters in Main.m. An example parameter set resulting in frequency lock-in is included.... frequency... oscillator
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  • oscillate... frequency... frequency.... Frequency... oscillation
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  • frequency ratio sampling/signal:... However, it is interesting to understand why there is such a large incidence of noise in figures 14 and 15 (when using the laptop computer) whereas when using the diapason (figure 11) there is a crisp peak at 440Hz and even the second harmonic is clearly noticeable at 880Hz, with the noise signal being dwarfed by an impressively distinct FFT peak. When using the signal generator, there is a very crisp peak at 2000Hz, and when looking at figure 15, this is not the case. It can be concluded that in terms of quality of disturbance, the diapason ranks first, followed by the signal generator and by the laptop computer, responsible for the most noise. From this, the idea of subtracting the noise spectrum from the other graphs, even when possessing matching folding frequencies, is invalid, as the noise is dependent on the source causing the disturbance.... Distance travelled by the mirror From figure (6) it can be seen that the reciprocal of the distance between the peaks gives the time it takes for one bright fringe to turn into another bright fringe, and this is directly proportional to the distance travelled by the mirror; to be able to achieve a clear peak to peak frequency, the mirror must have moved a full λ before coming back to its original position, or it must be moving with constant velocity for a distance Nλ before moving backwards. The occurrence of double peaks proves that the mirror effectively does move by λ as opposed to a distance Nλ because the regularity of the disturbance must be caused by a one off event, periodic with the oscillation of the mirror. The scenario of the perturbation occurring in regular steps of Nλ, thus dependent upon the mirror’s horizontal displacement is very unlikely. Hence, by analysing the disturbance it is possible to conclude that the mirror does indeed move a full λ in distance; the mirror moves 633nm per oscillation. The double peaks were removed by tweaking the mirrors making the central maxima form in the centre of the detector.... frequency 800Hz.txt... Proceeding When the tuning fork is hit, a sound wave will propagate through the air. This will cause compressions and expansions in the air, resulting in higher and lower density regions respectively. The density of particles is proportional to the refractive index, hence when shining a laser beam through this perturbed region, it will be affected by these fluctuations in refractive index. By looking at how such fluctuations affect the interference pattern produced on the screen one can extract important information such as the frequency of the sound wave.... FFT frequency The folding frequency[footnoteRef:4] is the step for which the FFT components are calculated, it is found by adding the folding frequency to each data point, starting from 0. Hence, the first FFT data point would be plotted to an x coordinate of 0, the second would be the folding frequency, the third would be two times the folding frequency and so on. According to the Nyquist theorem of sampling; the maximum frequency component that can be determined using a given dataset of points equally spaced t seconds apart is equal to 1/(2t). The folding frequency is therefore:... In a Michelson interferometer, light from a monochromatic source (S) is divided by a beam splitter (BS), oriented at an angle of 45° to the beam, producing two beams of equal intensity. The transmitted beam (T) travels to mirror M2 where it is reflected back to BS. 50% of the returning beam is then deflected by 90° at the beam splitter and is made to strike the detector (D). The reflected beam travels to mirror M1, where it is reflected. Again, 50% of the beam passes straight through the BS and reaches the detector. The Laser is a He-Ne laser, having a polarized wavelength of 633nm (red). The wave is coherent and monochromatic; since the beam is coherent, light from other sources will not interfere with the interference pattern. Mirrors provide a way for the beam to change its direction of travel, if M1 and M2 are misaligned, the recombination of the beams occurs at a different location in the BS, resulting in the formation of two signals on D which do not form an interference pattern. When working with laser light, a cube beamsplitter (CB) possesses the best combination of optical performance and power handling ,CBs avoid displacing the beam by being perpendicular to the incident beam. To achieve the best possible performance, CBs should be operated with collimated light as convergent or divergent beams will contribute unwanted spherical aberrations to the setup. A piezoelectric was connected to a signal generator and attached to M2. This acted as a test for the apparatus and allowed the mirror to oscillate at various frequencies. The distance travelled by M2 due to excitation of the piezoelectric was a secondary investigation inherent in the project. The detector used allowed the intensity of light hitting it to be recorded. When two or more waves interact with one another an interference pattern is produced. This pattern is a result of the phase difference between the waves. When the waves are in phase constructive interference occurs and the resulting amplitude of the two superimposed waves is a maximum, on a screen, this is seen as a light fringe. When the waves are π out of phase, destructive interference occurs and the resulting amplitude is 0, on a screen this is seen as a dark fringe.
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  • frequencies... oscillations,... frequency... oscillations... oscillation
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  • frequencies... frequency... oscillations
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  • The singularities of the integrand are a group of poles, most of which have large imaginary parts and do not represent any physical solution (not shown). Only a single pole with a small imaginary part in some frequency region corresponds to an observable magnonic solution. Note that due to regularity of the expression with respect to k, all singularities of the integrand are attributable to the matrix . This means that coordinates of the poles are provided by the equation , which is equivalent to the dispersion equation GOTOBUTTON ZEqnNum225748 \* MERGEFORMAT (S.13). That confirms that a localized source excites the same wave as described by the dispersion equation.... In this Section, we describe a model for oscillation of a magnetic moment of an individual particle. Each particle is a sphere of radius a made of yttrium iron garnet (YIG). We choose it for its record low damping making it the most suitable for magnonic purposes. All particles are placed in the external static magnetic field and magnetized to saturation in the direction of the chain axes. The dynamic susceptibility tensor is given by the Polder tensor []... Eq. GOTOBUTTON ZEqnNum333740 \* MERGEFORMAT (S.5) is a starting point in the further analysis of magnetic oscillations in single and double magnonic chains.... In this Section, we study spin waves eigenmodes, i.e., collective oscillations of magnetic moments guided by a double chain of magnetic particles (see Fig. S3). Interaction of the chain with an external source and excitation of spin waves is considered in Section 5 of this Supplementary.
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  • Objective/hypothesis: We hypothised that frequency and intensity of stimulation somehow relate with each other. Our goal was to select the optimal frequency with low intensity for PD. We clarified the importance of age in the effect of rTMS.... Van Merhaegen-Wieleman, A., Parys, E., De Keyser, J., Baeken, C., 2016. Bilateral low frequency ... In this study we confirmed the importance of the intensity of the treatment with rTMS, which may differ according to the frequency of stimulations. The effect of rTMS develops slowly and its effect is maintained for months. We observed a strong age dependency in the effect of rTMS, which may indicate the need for more frequent treatment with rTMS in patients over 65 yrs than in the younger group of age. The longevity of the effect is not only, explained by the modification of the brain plasticity or the induction of the dopamine release in the striatum by rTMS. Although, the role of the prolonged elevation of BDNF and production of progenitor cells in the brain may be an important mechanism in the effect of rTMS.... Ranieri, F., Tonali, P.A., Rothwell, J.C., 2008. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation suppresses specific excitatory circuits in the human motor cortex. J. Physiol. 586, 4481-4487.
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