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  • Abstract: Simultaneous measurements of free amino acids in seawater (underlying water, ULW, and sea surface microlyer, SML), size-segregated aerosol particle and cloud water samples at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (CVAO) in the framework of the MarParCloud project with contribution of MARSU in September/October 2017. During this campaign, sampling of size-segregated aerosol particles at the CVAO (30 m sampling tower) and seawater sampling at the ocean site (~16°53ˈ30ˈN, ~24°54ˈ00ˈˈW) were performed. Additionally, aerosol sampler and cloud water sampler were installed at the mountain station on the top of the mountain 'Monte Verde (MV)' (744 m a.s.l.). The amino acid analysis includes glycine (Gly), L-alanine (Ala), L-serine (Ser), L-glutamic acid (Glu), L-threonine (Thr), L-proline (Pro), L-tyrosine (Tyr), L-valine (Val), L-phenylalanine (Phe), L-aspartic acid (Asp), L-isoleucine (Ile), L-leucine (Leu), L-methionine (Met), L-glutamine (Gln) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) (purity ≥ 99 %, Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, Missouri, USA). The analytical measurements of the derivatized FAA, derivatization was performed using AccQ-Tag™ precolumn derivatization method (Waters, Eschborn, Germany), were performed with ultra high performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization and Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC/ESI Orbtitrap-MS). Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: Not Available
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    • File Set
  • Abstract: Imagery transects with a camera attached to a multibox corer providing seabed images were carried out during POLARSTERN expedition ANT-XXIX/9 (PS82) focussing on the ecology of benthic assemblages on the southern and eastern Weddell Sea shelves. The camera system attached to the multibox corer was composed of one casing housing a Cannon EOS 100 camera, a second casing housing a flash-light, two lights fixed to the multibox corer frame, and 4.5cm distanced parallel lasers providing a scale in the images. The camera was tilted to a 45° angle. The transects were done along the drift trail of the ship, maximum speed was 1knot, and minimum speed varied with current speed. The winch of the ship was used to maintain a distance of approximately 1-2m above the seabed. The seabed images provide insights into the general composition of key species, higher systematic groups and ecological guilds. Within interdisciplinary approaches, distributions of assemblages can be attributed to environmental conditions such as bathymetry, sediment characteristics, water masses and current regimes. The images also contain valuable information on how benthic species are associated to each other. Transect files include individual images, whereas metadata of each image is found in a separate file. Geographical coordinates of images was based on the Posidonia system of the telemetry box attached to the multibox corer. Due to technical problems, St-033 and 044 were carried without Posidonia, thus Latitude and Longitude for each image is unavailable. For all other transects the Posidonia system was functional and, with a few exceptions, most images have their corresponding Latitude and Longitude. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: Not Available
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  • Abstract: A deep-sea temperature record for the past 50 million years has been produced from the magnesium/calcium ratio (Mg/Ca) in benthic foraminiferal calcite. The record is strikingly similar in form to the corresponding benthic oxygen isotope (δ18O) record and defines an overall cooling of about 12°C in the deep oceans with four main cooling periods. Used in conjunction with the benthic δ18O record, the magnesium temperature record indicates that the first major accumulation of Antarctic ice occurred rapidly in the earliest Oligocene (34 million years ago) and was not accompanied by a decrease in deep-sea temperatures. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: Not Available
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  • Abstract: Background: Urbanization is an important indicator of economic growth and social change but is associated with environmental degradation, which threatens sustainable growth of African cities. One of the most vulnerable ecosystems in urban areas are wetlands. In Uganda, wetlands cover an area of 11% of the country's land area. Half of the wetland areas in Ugandan cities have been converted to industry and residential areas, and urban agriculture. There is limited information on the extent of wetland conversion or utilization for urban agriculture. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of wetlands lost in two Ugandan cities, Wakiso and Kampala, in the last 30 years. Secondly, we demonstrate a simple methodology to monitor agriculture on encroached wetlands. Methods: Using a field survey and free remote sensing data from Landsat TM 1986 and Landsat ETM 2016 we classified the rate of wetland loss and encroachment in the last 30 years. Using MODIS NDVI 16-day composites at 500-meter spatial resolution, we generated distinctive crops and crop mixtures in the encroached wetlands for urban agriculture using the ISODATA clustering algorithm. Results: Over a 30-year period, 72,828 ha (73%) of the Wakiso-Kampala wetlands have been lost. Agriculture area on the other hand doubled. Of the new cultivation area, 16,488 ha (23%) were reclaimed from wetlands. All cultivated agriculture in Kampala was in the wetlands while in Wakiso, 73% of crop agriculture was in the wetlands. The major crops grown in these urban wetlands were banana (20%), sugarcane (22%), maize (17%), Eucalyptus trees (12%), sweet potatoes (10%), while ornamental nurseries, pine trees, vegetables and passion fruits were each at 5%. Conclusions: Current wetland exploitation for food security for urban dwellers may be a trade-off between the provision of food in the short-term and the loss of important ecosystems services in the long-term. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: * LATITUDE: 1.067000 * LONGITUDE: 31.883000 * LOCATION: Africa, Uganda * METHOD/DEVICE: Multiple investigations
    Data Types:
    • File Set
  • Abstract: Background: Urbanization is an important indicator of economic growth and social change but is associated with environmental degradation, which threatens sustainable growth of African cities. One of the most vulnerable ecosystems in urban areas are wetlands. In Uganda, wetlands cover an area of 11% of the country's land area. Half of the wetland areas in Ugandan cities have been converted to industry and residential areas, and urban agriculture. There is limited information on the extent of wetland conversion or utilization for urban agriculture. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of wetlands lost in two Ugandan cities, Wakiso and Kampala, in the last 30 years. Secondly, we demonstrate a simple methodology to monitor agriculture on encroached wetlands. Methods: Using a field survey and free remote sensing data from Landsat TM 1986 and Landsat ETM 2016 we classified the rate of wetland loss and encroachment in the last 30 years. Using MODIS NDVI 16-day composites at 500-meter spatial resolution, we generated distinctive crops and crop mixtures in the encroached wetlands for urban agriculture using the ISODATA clustering algorithm. Results: Over a 30-year period, 72,828 ha (73%) of the Wakiso-Kampala wetlands have been lost. Agriculture area on the other hand doubled. Of the new cultivation area, 16,488 ha (23%) were reclaimed from wetlands. All cultivated agriculture in Kampala was in the wetlands while in Wakiso, 73% of crop agriculture was in the wetlands. The major crops grown in these urban wetlands were banana (20%), sugarcane (22%), maize (17%), Eucalyptus trees (12%), sweet potatoes (10%), while ornamental nurseries, pine trees, vegetables and passion fruits were each at 5%. Conclusions: Current wetland exploitation for food security for urban dwellers may be a trade-off between the provision of food in the short-term and the loss of important ecosystems services in the long-term. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: * LATITUDE: 1.067000 * LONGITUDE: 31.883000 * LOCATION: Africa, Uganda * METHOD/DEVICE: Multiple investigations
    Data Types:
    • File Set
  • Abstract: Background: Urbanization is an important indicator of economic growth and social change but is associated with environmental degradation, which threatens sustainable growth of African cities. One of the most vulnerable ecosystems in urban areas are wetlands. In Uganda, wetlands cover an area of 11% of the country's land area. Half of the wetland areas in Ugandan cities have been converted to industry and residential areas, and urban agriculture. There is limited information on the extent of wetland conversion or utilization for urban agriculture. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of wetlands lost in two Ugandan cities, Wakiso and Kampala, in the last 30 years. Secondly, we demonstrate a simple methodology to monitor agriculture on encroached wetlands. Methods: Using a field survey and free remote sensing data from Landsat TM 1986 and Landsat ETM 2016 we classified the rate of wetland loss and encroachment in the last 30 years. Using MODIS NDVI 16-day composites at 500-meter spatial resolution, we generated distinctive crops and crop mixtures in the encroached wetlands for urban agriculture using the ISODATA clustering algorithm. Results: Over a 30-year period, 72,828 ha (73%) of the Wakiso-Kampala wetlands have been lost. Agriculture area on the other hand doubled. Of the new cultivation area, 16,488 ha (23%) were reclaimed from wetlands. All cultivated agriculture in Kampala was in the wetlands while in Wakiso, 73% of crop agriculture was in the wetlands. The major crops grown in these urban wetlands were banana (20%), sugarcane (22%), maize (17%), Eucalyptus trees (12%), sweet potatoes (10%), while ornamental nurseries, pine trees, vegetables and passion fruits were each at 5%. Conclusions: Current wetland exploitation for food security for urban dwellers may be a trade-off between the provision of food in the short-term and the loss of important ecosystems services in the long-term. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: * LATITUDE: 1.067000 * LONGITUDE: 31.883000 * LOCATION: Africa, Uganda * METHOD/DEVICE: Multiple investigations
    Data Types:
    • File Set
  • Abstract: Background: Urbanization is an important indicator of economic growth and social change but is associated with environmental degradation, which threatens sustainable growth of African cities. One of the most vulnerable ecosystems in urban areas are wetlands. In Uganda, wetlands cover an area of 11% of the country's land area. Half of the wetland areas in Ugandan cities have been converted to industry and residential areas, and urban agriculture. There is limited information on the extent of wetland conversion or utilization for urban agriculture. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of wetlands lost in two Ugandan cities, Wakiso and Kampala, in the last 30 years. Secondly, we demonstrate a simple methodology to monitor agriculture on encroached wetlands. Methods: Using a field survey and free remote sensing data from Landsat TM 1986 and Landsat ETM 2016 we classified the rate of wetland loss and encroachment in the last 30 years. Using MODIS NDVI 16-day composites at 500-meter spatial resolution, we generated distinctive crops and crop mixtures in the encroached wetlands for urban agriculture using the ISODATA clustering algorithm. Results: Over a 30-year period, 72,828 ha (73%) of the Wakiso-Kampala wetlands have been lost. Agriculture area on the other hand doubled. Of the new cultivation area, 16,488 ha (23%) were reclaimed from wetlands. All cultivated agriculture in Kampala was in the wetlands while in Wakiso, 73% of crop agriculture was in the wetlands. The major crops grown in these urban wetlands were banana (20%), sugarcane (22%), maize (17%), Eucalyptus trees (12%), sweet potatoes (10%), while ornamental nurseries, pine trees, vegetables and passion fruits were each at 5%. Conclusions: Current wetland exploitation for food security for urban dwellers may be a trade-off between the provision of food in the short-term and the loss of important ecosystems services in the long-term. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: * LATITUDE: 1.067000 * LONGITUDE: 31.883000 * LOCATION: Africa, Uganda * METHOD/DEVICE: Multiple investigations
    Data Types:
    • File Set
  • Abstract: The materials in this archive are organized as follows: 1) "katla" directory contains: - the processed seismograms (local earthquakes removed, decimated to a sampling rate of 10 Hz) in the "seismograms" directory - the correlation envelopes used in the real-data example (tremor at Katla volcano) in the "covariograms" directory - the MATLAB scripts to generate the correlation envelopes from the processed seismograms 2) "synthetic" directory contains: - the MATLAB scripts to generate synthetic data used in the synthetic tests Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: * LATITUDE: 63.633000 * LONGITUDE: -19.050000 * LOCATION: Iceland * METHOD/DEVICE: Multiple investigations
    Data Types:
    • File Set
  • Abstract: ASCII files reporting the position time-series, in the Adria-fixed reference frame, of GNSS in the Eastern-Southern Alps The columns are: Time, E, N, Se, Sn, Ren, U, Su, Reu, Rnu, site, long, lati, representing, respectively, epoch (in decimal years), displacement in the East component (in mm), displacement in the North component (in mm), uncertainty (one standard deviation) of the East component (in mm), uncertainty (one standard deviation) of the North component (in mm), correlation between the East and North components, displacement in the Up component (in mm), uncertainty (one standard deviation) of the Up component (in mm), correlation between the East and Up components, correlation between the North and Up components, Station ID (four letters), Longitude of the station (°), Latitude of the station (°). Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: Not Available
    Data Types:
    • Dataset
    • File Set
  • Abstract: Not Available Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: Not Available
    Data Types:
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    • File Set