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  • Dataset
This is the dataset of the various figures proposed in the article Fully integrated frequency references
Data Types:
  • Dataset
This is the dataset of the various figures proposed in the article Fully integrated frequency references
Data Types:
  • Dataset
Recent evidence suggests that ongoing brain oscillations may be instrumental in binding and integrating multisensory signals. In the present experiment, we investigated the temporal dynamics of visual-motor integration processes. We show that action modulates sensitivity to visual contrast discrimination in a rhythmic fashion at frequencies of about 5Hz (in the theta range), for up to one second after execution of action. To understand the origin of the oscillations, we measured oscillations in contrast sensitivity at different levels of luminance, which is known to affect the endogenous brain rhythms, boosting the power of alpha-frequencies. We found that the frequency of oscillation in sensitivity increased at low-luminance, likely reflecting the shift in mean endogenous brain rhythm towards higher frequencies. Importantly, both at high and at low luminance, contrast discrimination showed a rhythmic motor-induced suppression effect, with the suppression occurring earlier at low luminance. We suggest that oscillations play a key role in sensory-motor integration, and that the motor-induced suppression may reflect the first manifestation of a rhythmic oscillation.
Data Types:
  • Dataset
Recent evidence suggests that ongoing brain oscillations may be instrumental in binding and integrating multisensory signals. In the present experiment, we investigated the temporal dynamics of visual-motor integration processes. We show that action modulates sensitivity to visual contrast discrimination in a rhythmic fashion at frequencies of about 5Hz (in the theta range), for up to one second after execution of action. To understand the origin of the oscillations, we measured oscillations in contrast sensitivity at different levels of luminance, which is known to affect the endogenous brain rhythms, boosting the power of alpha-frequencies. We found that the frequency of oscillation in sensitivity increased at low-luminance, likely reflecting the shift in mean endogenous brain rhythm towards higher frequencies. Importantly, both at high and at low luminance, contrast discrimination showed a rhythmic motor-induced suppression effect, with the suppression occurring earlier at low luminance. We suggest that oscillations play a key role in sensory-motor integration, and that the motor-induced suppression may reflect the first manifestation of a rhythmic oscillation.
Data Types:
  • Dataset
Recent evidence suggests that ongoing brain oscillations may be instrumental in binding and integrating multisensory signals. In the present experiment, we investigated the temporal dynamics of visual-motor integration processes. We show that action modulates sensitivity to visual contrast discrimination in a rhythmic fashion at frequencies of about 5Hz (in the theta range), for up to one second after execution of action. To understand the origin of the oscillations, we measured oscillations in contrast sensitivity at different levels of luminance, which is known to affect the endogenous brain rhythms, boosting the power of alpha-frequencies. We found that the frequency of oscillation in sensitivity increased at low-luminance, likely reflecting the shift in mean endogenous brain rhythm towards higher frequencies. Importantly, both at high and at low luminance, contrast discrimination showed a rhythmic motor-induced suppression effect, with the suppression occurring earlier at low luminance. We suggest that oscillations play a key role in sensory-motor integration, and that the motor-induced suppression may reflect the first manifestation of a rhythmic oscillation.
Data Types:
  • Dataset
Recent evidence suggests that ongoing brain oscillations may be instrumental in binding and integrating multisensory signals. In the present experiment, we investigated the temporal dynamics of visual-motor integration processes. We show that action modulates sensitivity to visual contrast discrimination in a rhythmic fashion at frequencies of about 5Hz (in the theta range), for up to one second after execution of action. To understand the origin of the oscillations, we measured oscillations in contrast sensitivity at different levels of luminance, which is known to affect the endogenous brain rhythms, boosting the power of alpha-frequencies. We found that the frequency of oscillation in sensitivity increased at low-luminance, likely reflecting the shift in mean endogenous brain rhythm towards higher frequencies. Importantly, both at high and at low luminance, contrast discrimination showed a rhythmic motor-induced suppression effect, with the suppression occurring earlier at low luminance. We suggest that oscillations play a key role in sensory-motor integration, and that the motor-induced suppression may reflect the first manifestation of a rhythmic oscillation.
Data Types:
  • Dataset
Axial head-rolling oscillation frequencies determined from 28 video sequences obtained from 13 individual shrikes.
Data Types:
  • Dataset
Axial head-rolling oscillation frequencies determined from 28 video sequences obtained from 13 individual shrikes.
Data Types:
  • Dataset
Axial head-rolling oscillation frequencies determined from 28 video sequences obtained from 13 individual shrikes.
Data Types:
  • Dataset