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The SPR technique is based on a complex optical phenomenon. When photon reaches the interface of two medium with different refractive indexes at a specific angle range, the resonant oscillation of surface plasmon generated by metal free electron can be induced. The resonance also requires that the frequency of incident photon matches the natural oscillating frequency of the surface plasmon. https://www.profacgen.com/surface-plasmon-resonance-spr-service.htm
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  • Video
The SPR technique is based on a complex optical phenomenon. When photon reaches the interface of two medium with different refractive indexes at a specific angle range, the resonant oscillation of surface plasmon generated by metal free electron can be induced. The resonance also requires that the frequency of incident photon matches the natural oscillating frequency of the surface plasmon. https://www.profacgen.com/surface-plasmon-resonance-spr-service.htm
Data Types:
  • Video
Slime mould Physarum polycephalum is a single cell which physically oscillates via contraction of actomyosin in order to achieve motility. Several of its apparently ‘intelligent’ behaviour patterns such as anticipatory responses to periodic stimuli have recently been attributed as functions of the coupling between the oscillating intracellular reactions which drive its rhythmic muscular contraction, but the mechanisms that underlie these phenomena have not yet been experimentally verified. Through laboratory investigations in which we entrain the P. polycephalum plasmodium via periodic ultraviolet light exposure we find that this phenomenon is likely to result from biasing its various oscillating life processes through altering local concentration profiles of various allosteric molecules and their effectors. This temporarily overwrites the global streaming clock frequency and eradicates the wave packets usually observed in slime mould biomechanical oscillation. This response is likened to an intracellular chemical memory. We proceed to present a multi-agent model in which we demonstrate that travelling waves and oscillatory clock frequencies may emerge in the virtual organism’s biomechanical oscillator, although anticipatory responses cannot be replicated by simple mechanical interactions. We conclude by arguing that these phenomena are best characterised as analogue computation and discuss practical applications therein. The Physarum polycephalum actin network in a plasmodial tubule. SiR-actin staining, scale bar 200 μm.
Data Types:
  • Video
Slime mould Physarum polycephalum is a single cell which physically oscillates via contraction of actomyosin in order to achieve motility. Several of its apparently ‘intelligent’ behaviour patterns such as anticipatory responses to periodic stimuli have recently been attributed as functions of the coupling between the oscillating intracellular reactions which drive its rhythmic muscular contraction, but the mechanisms that underlie these phenomena have not yet been experimentally verified. Through laboratory investigations in which we entrain the P. polycephalum plasmodium via periodic ultraviolet light exposure we find that this phenomenon is likely to result from biasing its various oscillating life processes through altering local concentration profiles of various allosteric molecules and their effectors. This temporarily overwrites the global streaming clock frequency and eradicates the wave packets usually observed in slime mould biomechanical oscillation. This response is likened to an intracellular chemical memory. We proceed to present a multi-agent model in which we demonstrate that travelling waves and oscillatory clock frequencies may emerge in the virtual organism’s biomechanical oscillator, although anticipatory responses cannot be replicated by simple mechanical interactions. We conclude by arguing that these phenomena are best characterised as analogue computation and discuss practical applications therein. The Physarum polycephalum actin network in a plasmodial tubule. SiR-actin staining, scale bar 200 μm.
Data Types:
  • Video
This video presents the profiles of the TEM_00 and TEM_01 transverse electromagnetic modes (with non-equal frequency) as well as the resulting intensity of the total electric field (with ratio between the modes amplitudes equal to 0.7) as a function of time. The output beam is oscillating in space as the relative phase difference between the two fields changes.
Data Types:
  • Video
This video presents the profiles of the TEM_00 and TEM_01 transverse electromagnetic modes (with non-equal frequency) as well as the resulting intensity of the total electric field (with ratio between the modes amplitudes equal to 0.7) as a function of time. The output beam is oscillating in space as the relative phase difference between the two fields changes.
Data Types:
  • Video
Actual stroke volume (aSV) with targeted aSV. Bar graph indicates mean aSV (n = 5), and vertical bar indicates standard deviation. There are no significant differences between R100 (IT = 50%), 3100B (IT = 50%), and 3100 B (IT = 33%) with all targeted aSV at both frequencies. (PPTX 710 kb)
Data Types:
  • Video
Actual stroke volume (aSV) with targeted aSV. Bar graph indicates mean aSV (n = 5), and vertical bar indicates standard deviation. There are no significant differences between R100 (IT = 50%), 3100B (IT = 50%), and 3100 B (IT = 33%) with all targeted aSV at both frequencies. (PPTX 710 kb)
Data Types:
  • Video
Visualisation 1 shows an animation of the experimentally measured real time laser dynamics of a swept source external cavity laser. The complex electric field of the laser is measured using an interferometric phase detection technique. The upper plot of the animation displays the instantaneous optical spectrum over the course of 500 ns calculated from the windowed E-field. The lower plots show the corresponding measured Intensity and instantaneous frequency of the laser over the same period. The windowing limits are shown with red, dashed lines. During this time period, the laser operates in several dynamic regimes, including CW operation, mode-hopping dynamics, multi-mode transient oscillations, and chirped mode-pulling.
Data Types:
  • Video
The video shows the absolute value of the wave electric field of an electromagnetic wave propagating across a plasma with density fluctuations. It has been obtained with full-wave simulations using a cold plasma model (for details about the code, see Ref. [1]). The geometry was such that a constant background density is taken with half of the cut-off density of the injected microwave. Onto that homogeneous background, density fluctuations are added which are indicated by the white contour lines in the video where each contour line corresponds to an additional increase of 10 % of the cut-off density. Note that only positive density perturbations (with respect the background density) are shown. The density fluctuations are obtained from a Hasegawa-Wakatani drift-wave turbulence model, see Ref. [2]. A constant background magnetic field is used, oriented perpendicular to the simulation domain with a strength corresponding to half of the electron cyclotron resonance frequency. An O-mode is injected with a beam radius of 2 times the vacuum wavelength. The number in the lower left corner indicates the wave oscillation periods. A quantitative analysis of the beam scattering can be found in Ref. [3]. [1]: doi 10.1088/0741-3335/50/8/085018 [2]: doi 10.5281/zenodo.47206 [3]: arXiv:1604.00344
Data Types:
  • Video