Filter Results
17 results
  • In optically controlled quantum computers it may be favorable to address different qubits using light with different frequencies, since the optical diffraction does not then limit the distance between qubits. Using qubits that are close to each other enables qubit-qubit interactions and gate operations that are strong and fast in comparison to qubit-environment interactions and decoherence rates. However, as qubits are addressed in frequency space, great care has to be taken when designing the laser pulses, so that they perform the desired operation on one qubit, without affecting other qubits. Complex hyperbolic secant pulses have theoretically been shown to be excellent for such frequency-addressed quantum computing [I. Roos and K. Molmer, Phys. Rev. A 69, 022321 (2004)]—e.g., for use in quantum computers based on optical interactions in rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystals. The optical transition lines of the rare-earth-metal-ions are inhomogeneously broadened and therefore the frequency of the excitation pulses can be used to selectively address qubit ions that are spatially separated by a distance much less than a wavelength. Here, frequency-selective transfer of qubit ions between qubit states using complex hyperbolic secant pulses is experimentally demonstrated. Transfer efficiencies better than 90% were obtained. Using the complex hyperbolic secant pulses it was also possible to create two groups of ions, absorbing at specific frequencies, where 85% of the ions at one of the frequencies was shifted out of resonance with the field when ions in the other frequency group were excited. This procedure of selecting interacting ions, called qubit distillation, was carried out in preparation for two-qubit gate operations in the rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystals. The techniques for frequency-selective state-to-state transfer developed here may be also useful also for other quantum optics and quantum information experiments in these long-coherence-time solid-state systems.
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • Universal quantum information processing requires single-qubit rotations and two-qubit interactions as minimal resources. A possible step beyond this minimal scheme is the use of three-qubit interactions. We consider such three-qubit interactions and show how they can reduce the time required for a quantum state transfer in an XY spin chain. For the experimental implementation, we use liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, where three-qubit interactions can be implemented by sequences of radio-frequency pulses.
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • low frequency oscillations
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • Modelling oscillations
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • Coherent Raman scattering can generate Stokes and anti-Stokes fields of comparable intensities. When the Raman shift is due to a magnetic resonance transition (usually in the MHz to GHz range), the Raman fields are generally detected by optical heterodyne detection, using the excitation laser as the local oscillator. In this case, the two sidebands generate beat signals at the same frequency and are therefore indistinguishable. Separation of the two contributions becomes possible, however, by superheterodyne detection with a frequency-shifted optical local oscillator. We compare the two scattering processes, and show how the symmetry between them can be broken in Pr3+:YAlO3.
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • The coupling between quantum-confined electron spins in semiconductor heterostructures and nuclear spins dominates the dephasing of spin qubits in III/V semiconductors. The interaction can be measured through the electron-spin dynamics or through its effect on the nuclear spin. Here, we discuss the resulting shift of the NMR frequency (the Knight shift) and measure its size as a function of the charge-carrier density for photoexcited charge carriers in a GaAs quantum well.
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • We study the dynamics of a single spin 1/2 coupled to a bath of spins 1/2 by inhomogeneous Heisenberg couplings including a central magnetic field. This central-spin model describes decoherence in quantum bit systems. An exact formula for the dynamics of the central spin is presented, based on the Bethe ansatz. For initially completely polarized bath spins and small magnetic field, we find persistent oscillations of the central spin about a nonzero mean value. For a large number of bath spins Nb, the oscillation frequency is proportional to Nb, whereas the amplitude behaves as 1/Nb, to leading order. No asymptotic decay of the oscillations due to the nonuniform couplings is observed, in contrast to some recent studies.
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • Physical Review Letters
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • A proper understanding and modelling of the behaviour of heavily loaded large-scale electrical transmission systems is essential for a secure and uninterrupted operation. In this paper we present a descriptive analysis especially of low frequency oscillations within an electricity network and methods to assess the stability of the whole system based on an ARMAX model and the ESPRIT algorithm. Further we present two methods to separate the network into local areas, which is necessary for an efficient modelling of a large electrical system. The first method has its foundation in the results of the ARMAX based stability analysis and the second method concentrates on the network topology. In the last part of this paper we present an approach how an modelling of such local areas within an large electrical system based on stochastic differential equation models is possible.
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) can be detected optically, with a laser beam propagating perpendicular to the static magnetic field. As in conventional EPR, excitation uses a resonant microwave field. The detection process can be interpreted as coherent Raman scattering or as a modulation of the laser beam by the circular dichroism of the sample oscillating at the microwave frequency. The latter model suggests that the signal should show the same dependence on the optical wavelength as the MCD signal. We check this for two different samples [cytochrome c-551, a metalloprotein, and ruby (Cr3 + :Al2O3)]. In both cases, the observed wavelength dependence is almost identical to that of the MCD signal. A quantitative estimate of the amplitude of the optically detected EPR signal from the MCD also shows good agreement with the experimental results.
    Data Types:
    • Document