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This session will look at the 'problem' of so-called predatory publishers. These firms regularly approach researchers via email to solicit manuscripts and conference papers and with the increased emphasis on publishing as a measure of success it can be easy to give into temptation. This session will look at whether these publishers are a problem, how to spot a potential predatory publisher or conference and the best action to take if you are approached.
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Data management is a vital part of all research projects. Done well it can save time and stress as well as making the research process more efficient. This session will introduce participants to the basic elements of managing the information they use and create as part of their projects including how information can be backed up, stored and shared.
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Public seminar given at the Institute of Criminology on 31st October 2019. Presents the argument given in the 'Societies' journal article of the same name.
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Presentation given at the CILIP Information Literacy Group Event "Exploring the Intersections of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communications". This presentation looks at the range of job roles available to librarians in scholarly communication and the skills they need to work in these roles. It also contains an activity designed to encourage the mapping of known information literacy skills on to existing scholarly communication job advertisements.
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How the Medical Library devised and implemented a new book fetching service
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In this contribution, a single-genre diachronic corpus of German sermons spanning nearly one millennium will be presented. It is being compiled in order to be able to study grammatical change focussing on the diachronic aspect, keeping other factors of variation as uniform as possible, especially genre. There are two main reasons for the decision to design a diachronic corpus that is based on the single genre ‘sermons’. Firstly, the received history of grammatical change in German is characterized by a heterogeneous data basis. For instance, Old High German has been studied especially on the basis of translations of Latin religious texts, Middle High German has typically been portrayed as the language of courtly poetry, and studies on Early New High German have focussed predominantly on the language of chancery and trade (cf. Fleischer/Schallert 2011, 26–27). It is not always clear, therefore, if the differences identified between these periods are to be attributed exclusively to diachronic change or at least partly to inter-genre variation. Narrowing down the view by focussing on a single genre that is well documented throughout the history of German is a way of mitigating this problem. A second problem lies in the type of source material typically used when studying grammatical change in the past. Usually the sources come from widely available material, which is often representative of registers detached from orality. This restriction has been tried to overcome by using sources ‘from below’ (cf. Elspaß 2005) or ‘ego-documents’ (cf. Rutten/van der Wal 2013), which exhibit more oral features than the written registers. Sermons offer a different take on historical orality: they represent a reproduction or imitation of physically oral (albeit monologic) communication from the pulpit (cf. e.g. Mertens 1991) and retain a typical set of oral features even in their written form (cf. e.g. Mertens 1992). The corpus is designed to include prints and manuscripts of sermons from different German-speaking regions. The texts are transcribed using TEI and manually annotated to make the corpus searchable for grammatical phenomena to be investigated, especially inflection. This presentation will sketch the outline of the project and its current status along with some first results. References Elspaß, Stephan (2005): Sprachgeschichte von unten. Untersuchungen zum geschriebenen Alltagsdeutsch im 19. Jahrhundert. Tübingen: Niemeyer. Fleischer, Jürg / Oliver Schallert (2011): Historische Syntax des Deutschen. Eine Einführung. Tübingen: Narr. Mertens, Volker (1991): “‚Texte unterwegs‘. Zu Funktions- und Textdynamik mittelalterlicher Predigten und den Konsequenzen für ihre Edition”. In: Danielle Buschinger / Wolfgang Spiewok (eds): Mittelalterforschung und Edition. Amiens: Université de Picardie, 75–85. Mertens, Volker (1992): “Predigt oder Traktat? Thesen zur Textdynamik mittelhochdeutscher geistlicher Prosa”. In: Jahrbuch für Internationale Germanistik 24/2, 41–43. van der Wal, Marijke J. / Gijsbert Rutten (eds) (2013): Touching the Past. Studies in the historical sociolinguistics of ego-documents. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: Benjamins.
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This presentation has been created for a course which covers the practical steps you need to take in order to ensure that work submitted for publication by University of Cambridge researchers is compliant for REF2021. It includes the principles of open access and open research, and guides the reader through the necessary steps to meet the open access requirements of REF2021. It highlights the key processes for uploading work to Symplectic, including choosing the right version of a work to upload (activity). It is of particular benefit to those who administer the uploading of research outputs to Symplectic Elements to make them open access.
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Repository management relies on knowledge of numerous attributes of academic journals, such as revenue model (subscription, hybrid or fully Open Access), self-archiving policies, licences, contacts for queries and article processing charges (APCs). While datasets collating some of this information are helpful to repository administrators, most cover only one or few of those attributes (e.g., APC price lists from publishers), do not provide APIs or their API responses are not machine readable (self-archiving policies from RoMEO), or are not updated very often (licences and APCs from DOAJ). As a result, most repositories still rely on administrative staff looking up and entering required attributes manually. To solve this problem and increase automation of tasks performed by the Cambridge repository team, I developed Orpheus, a database of academic journals/publishers written in Django. Orpheus was recently integrated with our DSpace repository Apollo and auxiliary systems via its RESTful API, enabling embargo periods to be automatically applied to deposited articles and streamlining the process of advising researchers on payments, licences and compliance to funders' Open Access policies. Orpheus is Open Source (https://github.com/osc-cam/orpheus) and may be easily expanded or tailored to meet the particular needs of other repositories and Scholarly Communication services.
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An introductory course on creating, editing and working with macros in Zendesk.
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