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  • Interviewee: Jeff Guido Interviewers: Stefano Alonzi, Sean Connell, Patrick Clancy Date: October 10, 2017 Location: History Department Office, Old Main, SUNY Cortland, Cortland, New York Length: 47:01 Jeff Guido was born in Cortland, New York on April 25, 1968 and has lived here his whole life. His mother’s grandmother emigrated here from England in the early 19th century with her older sister. Jeff’s family was involved in the industrial growth of Cortland during the economic boom. His great grandmother worked within the 1890 House, which at the time was the home of the Wickwire family, who were the owners of the Wickwire factory. His grandfather was an established factory worker, who climbed in the ranks until he had almost 400 people under him. His father was born in Clinton, New York, and completed university degree at SUNY Cortland where he met Jeff’s mother. His father worked as a teacher at Homer High School for many years, and his mother worked in a doctor’s office in Cortland. Jeff followed the footsteps of his father and graduated from Cortland High School, and continued his post secondary degree, studying History at SUNY Oswego. He completed his Teaching certification at SUNY Cortland and now works at Cortland High School. Jeff currently lives in Cortland, New York with his wife and three daughters and is an active member in the community. Jeff explains the obvious change in demographics that Cortland has seen through the industrial boom and the evident decline in economic wealth. He highlights the factories value to the Cortland community during the early stages of industrialization and how it shaped the town. Jeff held a position on City Council for 2 terms, which allowed him to understand the issues raised by the population of Cortland. He brings awareness to the importance of the university in this small community and its value to the town of Cortland...
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  • Interviewee: Louise Swoyer Interviewer: Tristan Luccari, Julie Becker, Jasmine Sprauve Date: October 12, 2017 Location: Old Main, SUNY Cortland, Cortland, New York Length: 1 audio file, 00:41:46 Louise Swoyer grew up in Cortland along with her parents and two brothers. She has traveled across the United States, visiting and living in different places. While growing up in Cortland, her father would take the family on road trips, through upstate New York and even up into New England. She remembers the great time she had in school with her teachers and friends, and at home with her family. She specifically remembered her grandfather, tending his garden. Her Grandfather John, J.W. Evans, used to work at the Wickwire Factory in Cortland, N.Y, but doesn’t recall him working while she was young. Louise attended Cayuga College, in New York, and after that traveled a bit, before finally settling down in Columbus, Ohio, where her husband had taught at Ohio State University. She eventually would go onto teach at the University as well, after introducing the ‘Adopt a School program’ in the city. The impact that Louise has not only had on the people she came in contact with, but even children that benefitted from the actions that she had taken to encourage a better education, is remarkable. Louise currently lives in Phoenix, A.Z, but has recently returned to visit Cortland a few years ago. She explained how it looked awfully different, other than Main Street, which continues to look very similar.
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  • Interviewee: Gail Beattie Interviewers: Tyler Samborski, Lyndsey Tapley, Garrett Sweeney Date: October 18, 2017 Location: 1890 House, Cortland, New York Length: 25:36 Gail Beattie was born on January 19, 1965 and has lived in Cortland, New York ever since. She attended Tompkins Cortland Community College. When she was younger she lived across the street from the Wickwire factory and remembered a handful of memories when her father worked at the factory, towards the end of the factory’s life. Besides her father, her aunt and her husband both worked for the Wickwire family. She remembered seeing fire that took the Wickwire factory. Even though times were financially difficult at times for Mrs. Beattie’s family, her parents were always able to find a way to make a living and support their children. Mrs. Beattie has lived through firsthand how life was after the closing of the Wickwire factory and a handful of other factories around the town of Cortland. She has said after all the industry left Cortland, Main Street followed soon after with a bunch of small mom and pop shops closing down and leaving the job market of Cortland very narrow. Mrs. Beattie did acknowledge the fact that SUNY Cortland has been very good economically to the city of Cortland but it does not come without any controversy. She says that there are people in the town of Cortland who do not like to have a college in the center of their town. Mrs. Beattie attended college and now works for Cortland County and has a son that attends SUNY Cortland. Mrs. Beattie’s connection to the Wickwire factory and her memory of the town prior to the industry leaving Cortland can help shape how we view what Cortland once was and how much it has drastically changed in all those years since the Wickwire factory and many other factories and industry left Cortland. She serves as a great source of information in due part to her whole life being spent in the city of Cortland.
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  • Interviewee: John Mandarano Interviewer: Zack Modine, Matt Morgante, Tommy Murphy Date: October 12, 2017 Location: SUNY Cortland Memorial Library, Cortland, New York Length: 50:02 John Mandarano was born on February 26, 1954 and has lived in the city of Cortland his entire life. The eldest of five children he has had a good positive relationship with both of his parents and all of his siblings. He was especially close with his father who owned and operated a machine and tool shop in town until 1976. John is a Machinist by trade, a Career he was inspired to do because of his father. His Father’s shop got most of its business from the Brockway Motor Company and when Brockway shutdown in 1977 most of the necessity for a Machine shop in Cortland went away as well. His father’s shop, Cortland Machine and Tool is also how he became close with his younger brother, Patrick, because of his father having both of them around his machine shop when they were young. As a result of their experience in their father’s Machine shop, John and Patrick have their own business venture together where they manufacture custom pieces that people order from them. They both enjoy this because they are able to pick and choose which projects they work on giving them freedom in their work. John worked all over Cortland County throughout his 40+ year career as a Machinist working for his father’s shop as well as Haskell Machine and Tool in Homer, New York. Then when Haskell Machine and Tool burned down in 1978 he moved to Coller Machine in Ithaca, New York. After working at Coller for a period of time he then went back to Cortland to work for Wilson Sporting Goods, making tools and jigs and machinery for their racquetball line of products. John began working for Pall Trinity in Cortland, New York and has been working there for the past 36 years. John is also very involved in the History of Cortland He is a member of the Cortland County Historical Society as well as a board member of the CNY....
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  • Is there a dichotomy between tolerance and free speech? A discussion on free speech, hate crimes, and tolerance within the context of antisemitism, Islamophobia, and racism, along with the debate within the UK around the governmental definitions for these forms of bigotry.
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  • Interviewee: Veronica Martin Interviewers: Brenna Venth, Matt McNally, Michael Mirabile, and Patrick McGuckin Date: October 5, 2017 Veronica Martin was born on February 4, 1935 in Cortland, New York to her parents, both whom were Italian immigrants. Veronica’s real name is Marian, however, that is a name that was passed down through her family, so when she became old enough, she asked people to call her Veronica. She was an only child and grew up surrounded by the love of her parents. Growing up in Cortland her entire life, she watched as the city of Cortland blossomed into what it is today, and what was prior. In Cortland, there were multiple stores and minimal restaurants different of how it is today. Her father and mother were both Italian immigrants, while her mother had a harder time assimilating to American society, and struggled to speak English. While her father assimilated rather quickly, he obtained several janitorial jobs for several stores downtown. Growing up during this time Veronica witnessed World War II and the effects it had on society. Food was rationed and many men that worked in the community were sent to war. After many years of Veronica’s father instructing that her mother learn English she attended classes. She then took the test to become a naturalized citizen. Veronica attended St. Mary’s School when she was a child and continued her education in college by attending the Eastman Dental Dispensary. She received her degree as a dental hygienist. After working as a dental hygienist in one of the county schools for a year, she....
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  • Interviewee: John Mandarano Interviewer: Zack Modine, Matt Morgante, Tommy Murphy Date: October 12, 2017 Location: SUNY Cortland Memorial Library, Cortland, New York Length: 50:02 John Mandarano was born on February 26, 1954 and has lived in the city of Cortland his entire life. The eldest of five children he has had a good positive relationship with both of his parents and all of his siblings. He was especially close with his father who owned and operated a machine and tool shop in town until 1976. John is a Machinist by trade, a Career he was inspired to do because of his father. His Father’s shop got most of its business from the Brockway Motor Company and when Brockway shutdown in 1977 most of the necessity for a Machine shop in Cortland went away as well. His father’s shop, Cortland Machine and Tool is also how he became close with his younger brother, Patrick, because of his father having both of them around his machine shop when they were young. As a result of their experience in their father’s Machine shop, John and Patrick have their own business venture together where they manufacture custom pieces that people order from them. They both enjoy this because they are able to pick and choose which projects they work on giving them freedom in their work. John worked all over Cortland County throughout his 40+ year career as a Machinist working for his father’s shop as well as Haskell Machine and Tool in Homer, New York. Then when Haskell Machine and Tool burned down in 1978 he moved to Coller Machine in Ithaca, New York. After working at Coller for a period of time he then went back to Cortland to work for Wilson Sporting Goods, making tools and jigs and machinery for their racquetball line of products. John began working for Pall Trinity in Cortland, New York and has been working there for the past 36 years. John is also very involved in the History of Cortland He is a member of the Cortland County Historical Society as well as a board member of the CNY...
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  • Interviewee: Louise Swoyer Interviewer: Tristan Luccari, Julie Becker, Jasmine Sprauve Date: October 12, 2017 Location: Old Main, SUNY Cortland, Cortland, New York Length: 1 audio file, 00:41:46 Louise Swoyer grew up in Cortland along with her parents and two brothers. She has traveled across the United States, visiting and living in different places. While growing up in Cortland, her father would take the family on road trips, through upstate New York and even up into New England. She remembers the great time she had in school with her teachers and friends, and at home with her family. She specifically remembered her grandfather, tending his garden. Her Grandfather John, J.W. Evans, used to work at the Wickwire Factory in Cortland, N.Y, but doesn’t recall him working while she was young. Louise attended Cayuga College, in New York, and after that traveled a bit, before finally settling down in Columbus, Ohio, where her husband had taught at Ohio State University. She eventually would go onto teach at the University as well, after introducing the ‘Adopt a School program’ in the city. The impact that Louise has not only had on the people she came in contact with, but even children that benefitted from the actions that she had taken to encourage a better education, is remarkable. Louise currently lives in Phoenix, A.Z, but has recently returned to visit Cortland a few years ago. She explained how it looked awfully different, other than Main Street, which continues to look very similar.
    Data Types:
    • Audio
  • Interviewers: Brenna Venth, Matt McNally, Michael Mirabile, and Patrick McGuckin Date: October 5, 2017 Veronica Martin was born on February 4, 1935 in Cortland, New York to her parents, both whom were Italian immigrants. Veronica’s real name is Marian, however, that is a name that was passed down through her family, so when she became old enough, she asked people to call her Veronica. She was an only child and grew up surrounded by the love of her parents. Growing up in Cortland her entire life, she watched as the city of Cortland blossomed into what it is today, and what was prior. In Cortland, there were multiple stores and minimal restaurants different of how it is today. Her father and mother were both Italian immigrants, while her mother had a harder time assimilating to American society, and struggled to speak English. While her father assimilated rather quickly, he obtained several janitorial jobs for several stores downtown. Growing up during this time Veronica witnessed World War II and the effects it had on society. Food was rationed and many men that worked in the community were sent to war. After many years of Veronica’s father instructing that her mother learn English she attended classes. She then took the test to become a naturalized citizen. Veronica attended St. Mary’s School when she was a child and continued her education in college by attending the Eastman Dental Dispensary. She received her degree as a dental hygienist. After working as a dental hygienist in one of the county schools for a year, she went back to school to get her BS in Health Education at SUNY Cortland. In the midst of earning another degree, she met her husband, Richard. They got married in 1961. She had three boys, John and Joseph, who were twins, and her youngest, Thomas, born in 1967. Upon getting her degree there were no health education jobs. She went back to dental hygiene in the Tully and Fabius Schools for six years. Mrs. Martin then worked for the Groton Health...
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