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“But Just Listen” is a website that explores the way stories of young voices can be told through conversations with an adult: particularly showcasing the student-teacher relationship. I created “But Just Listen” as a way for students of the Baltimore City Public Schools System (BCPSS) to express their views, opinions, and frustrations in a safe space. Not only does this platform act as a catharsis for the students, but it gives people of different ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds than the students they work with the opportunity to listen to what they really think and experience.
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A celebration of life for Professor Joe Morton was held Saturday June 18 at 1pm in the Athenaeum at Goucher College. Speakers were Jason Morton, Rebecca Morton, Nancy Magnuson, Katie Lautar, Sister Ardeth Platte, and Bart Houseman. Meredith Morton played the cello. The gathering music was performed by José Antonio Bowen. Dr. Morton was the founder of Goucher’s Peace Studies Program and professor emeritus of philosophy and peace studies. Dr. Morton learned the necessity of reconciliation at an early age. Born in Hungary, he came to the United States as a child with his parents and sister to escape the Holocaust. Dr. Morton received his bachelor’s degree from Amherst College and his doctorate in philosophy from the Johns Hopkins University. He came to Goucher in 1963, chaired the Philosophy Department from 1978 to 1988, and founded the Peace Studies Program in 1991, one of the few programs in the country of its kind at that time. He served Goucher faithfully until his retirement in 2000 and remained an active member of the community until his passing. These are Nancy Magnuson's remarks during the ceremony.,https://soundcloud.com/gouchercollege/a-celebration-of-life-joe-morton-2016,
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This interview will include questions about a variety of themes that we've covered in our course so far, in existential and humanistic psychology, including freedom, authenticity, optimal experience, and issues associated with our awareness of mortality.
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This selection of recordings presents six arias and scenes excerpted from Romantic-era American operas performed by Towson University’s “Music for the Stage” ensemble as part of a scholarly symposium entitled “Composing American Opera” held in February 2015. Each number is a representative highlight drawn from little-known and undeservedly forgotten contributions to the early operatic heritage of the United States. Arias from Arthur Clifton’s The Enterprise and George F. Bristow’s Rip Van Winkle illustrate 19th-century trends, especially the ways in which composers grappled with the imported influences of Italian bel canto and German Romantic opera. Selections from Frederick S. Converse’s The Sacrifice, Mary Carr Moore’s Narcissa, Henry Hadley’s Azora, and Charles Wakefield Cadman’s Shanewis illustrate the development of a distinctively American operatic idiom during the 1910s. During this decade, for the first time in the nation’s history, numerous new scores were regularly and consistently being composed, published, produced, critiqued by the press, staged in multiple cities, and sometimes even heard in excerpts on recordings. The U.S. was at last engaged in the making of operatic history, rather than simply receiving it second-hand from Europe. The rarity of this repertory is highlighted by the fact that none of the selections presented here are currently available in commercially released recordings. -Dr. Aaron Ziegel, Assistant Professor of Music History and Culture
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This recording is drawn from a program of arias and scenes researched and selected by Aaron Ziegel and performed by Towson University’s “Music for the Stage” ensemble as part of a scholarly symposium entitled “Composing American Opera” held in February 2015. All of the singers were Towson University students at the time; accompanying duties were shared between John Wilson and Aaron Ziegel.,The “sacrifice” of the opera’s title occurs when the male lead, Burton, an American military officer, throws himself before the approaching enemy, thereby securing a safe escape for his beloved Chonita, a Mexican maiden. This is an unusually non-patriotic ending for an American opera. Indeed, racial politics are the plot’s chief complicating factors. Set against the backdrop of the 1840s Mexican-American War, Burton is a rival for Chonita’s love and is in competition with her countryman, Bernal, who is fighting against the Americans. Emotionally torn between Burton’s entreaties and her fear that Bernal could be killed in battle, she ultimately seeks comfort in prayer. This “prayer aria” is presented here. Such numbers are of course common operatic ingredients for sopranos in distress, thus Converse’s example would resonate with an audience already familiar with similar instances in works of the standard repertory. The compositional goal here seems less to achieve a distinctively American idiom but rather to participate successfully alongside a European tradition.,
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This recording is drawn from a program of arias and scenes researched, annotated, and selected by Aaron Ziegel and performed by Towson University’s “Music for the Stage” ensemble as part of a scholarly symposium entitled “Composing American Opera” held in February 2015. All of the singers were Towson University students at the time; accompanying duties were shared between John Wilson and Aaron Ziegel.,The opera Narcissa provided several significant American firsts: it is the earliest true opera composed by a woman to receive a fully staged production under the baton of the composer herself. Its plot is based upon the life and death of an historical figure, Narcissa Whitman, a missionary to the Oregon Territory who was ultimately killed by members of the indigenous Cayuse tribe. The libretto, authored by the composer’s mother, presents Narcissa as a tragic heroine who gave her life in service to the nation. She, like Chonita from Converse’s The Sacrifice, is a character who turns to prayer in times of adversity. Her sense of patriotic duty to the expanding United States, her motherly care for the children orphaned by the hardships of pioneer life, and her abiding faithfulness as a missionary to the frontier West are all drawn together in this scene and lullaby, which opens the opera’s third act.,
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