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Researchers aimed to establish current criteria, procedure and qualifications for rarity assessment in law libraries through a survey of law school library staff. Seventeen librarians from relevant departments responded to the survey. While only about half of respondent institutions conduct rarity assessment, there is a degree of commonality to the criteria used in these assessments. Responses indicate that age and item status at sister institutions are the most common criteria in determining rarity. Survey responses also indicate that while rarity assessment is a task conducted by multiple staff members, little time is actually spent conducting assessments. Moreover, while respondents hold relevant, full-time staff positions and, in some cases, upper and middle management roles, very few have any formal education in rarity assessment.
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Aim: To explore the role that shared meals play within a caregiving
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Purpose: Efforts to evaluate and improve components of the Doctor of Pharmacy program at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy are an ongoing part of its curricular transformation. Molecular Foundations of Drug Action (MFDA) is a transformed first-semester course delivering pharmaceutical science and clinical application activities using a flipped-classroom model: pre-class preparation involves watching video lectures and in-class time is spent on concept clarification and problem-solving. The focus of this project was differentiation of MFDA from the legacy courses it subsumed (Phase 1) and identification of those course features and self-reported student behaviors most strongly linked to deep learning and durable, flexible retention (Phase 2).Methods: For Phase 1, a retrospective review of 1,600 total official student course evaluations from the three-course legacy medicinal chemistry sequence and from the MFDA replacement course yielded five consistently polled dimensions rated on five-point Likert scales (quality of course organization, utility of in-class activities, representativeness of assessment content, degree of challenge to think deeply, and overall course rating). Mean ratings, standard deviations, and unpaired t-tests of significance (alpha set at 0.05) were calculated for each dimension. For Phase 2, actual or reported time spent watching MFDA video lectures, time spent on various study activities (watch-summarize-question analyses, practicing retrieval, writing summaries, creating media, teaching self, or teaching others), and time spent in various study modes (massed, distributed, blocked, interleaved, the sum of massed and blocked, or the sum of distributed and interleaved) were correlated with performance on select assessments (mini exam, midterm exam, final exam, overall course, and capstone grades) via linear regression with r squared.Results: In Phase 1, MFDA was rated significantly higher than the medicinal chemistry legacy courses in aggregate on three of the five dimensions examined (utility of activities, p of 0.01; representativeness of assessments, p of 0.008; and degree of challenge, p less than 0.001). In Phase 2, actual watch time determined by the video software was a better positive predictor of overall course grade than student-reported watch time. As expected, due to intentional constructive alignment, grades from the mini exams, midterm exam, final exam, overall course, and capstone grades were all positively correlated. Practicing retrieval, creating media, and teaching others were more often positively correlated with performance than were other activities. Also, massed study and blocked study modes provided almost no benefit to performance, while distributed and interleaved study modes proved to be positively correlated with performance. Finally, students who performed at the top of the class in MFDA (i.e. earned As) reported spending nearly twice as much time on each of the most beneficial study activities and modes than those who performed at the bottom of the class (i.e. earned Cs and Fs).Conclusion: The Molecular Foundations of Drug Action course purposefully incorporated clinical application activities, assured representativeness of assessment items, and encouraged deep thinking, which were all seen to have positive effects on course evaluation. MFDA also provided instruction in evidence-based study techniques. Where applied by students, activities supported by educational literature were more often associated with higher performance on proximal, medial, and distal assessments of learning and retention. Future iterations of the course ought to structurally recruit the benefits of retrieval practice, creating concept maps, teaching others to solidify one’s own learning, and of distributed or interleaved study for better student outcomes.
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This study describes the collecting efforts by five different institutions across the United States of material from the March for Our Lives protests that took place in March of 2018. Interviews were conducted with staff at each of the following institutions: The North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Nashville Public Library’s Special Collections, University of Southern California’s Special Collections, Parkland Historical Society in Parkland, Florida and a government archive in Florida. The interviews highlighted how limited resources such as lack of funding and staff effect the ways in which institutions are collecting material from protests and current events across the country, the different types of material that is being collected, the manner in which these items are accessioned as well as the appraisal criteria. These findings can help archivists, historians, librarians and other information professionals better understand the variety of issues that exist regarding collecting from protest movements.
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Beyond merely narrating a history of an object’s production, transmission, and reception through varied modes of mass reproduction, I assert that the Jacquard loom was a media synthesizer that is not only important to the history of digital images, but to the history of American Art.
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A number of authors have explored an overlapping relationship between the criminalisation of prostitution and sex trafficking. Despite this close relationship, federal laws employ completely different assumptions of “consent” within each crime. In this study, I seek to analyse the treatment of individuals charged with sex trafficking and related crimes, based on a review of arrests for prostitution-related and sex trafficking offenses, as well as interviews with law enforcement leaders and advocates.  I compare theories and approaches laid out in federal law with the very different treatment observed "on the ground" in North Carolina. Using data from the North Carolina Administrative Office of the Courts Database, I analyze the entirety of North Carolina arrests from 2012 to 2017 to evaluate factors associated with the harshness of outcome following crimes of prostitution, solicitation, patronizing prostitution, promoting prostitution, and human trafficking. I find that while prostitution and solicitation are crimes that mainly impact females, patronizing, promoting prostitution and human trafficking are all targeted at males. While all studied crimes have high rates of acquittal, those arrested for female targeted crimes have about four times as many people arrested and about three times the likelihood of conviction. In addition, buyers of commercial sex are rarely ever arrested, while traffickers and promoters of commercial sex have less than a 10% likelihood of conviction. This data is supplemented by interviews with experts who point to the myth that paints prostitution as a consensual act instead of a crime against vulnerable women.
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