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  • DICOM imaging data sets, CT and PET. Distribution and kinetics of [18F]AB5186 in rats.
    Data Types:
    • Image
  • This data is a land classification map in support of University of Edinburgh PhD thesis and manuscript titled: "Oil palm concessions in southern Myanmar consist mostly of unconverted forest", Scientific Reports (in submission). It is supplied as a .tif which can be accessed using GIS software (e.g. ArcGIS, QGIS), Google Earth Engine. An additional version of the image is supplied in .png format for reference purposes only.
    Data Types:
    • Image
  • ### DOCOMOMO INTERNATIONAL MASS HOUSING ARCHIVE ### The provision of healthy modern housing for all was one of the foremost ideals of the Modern Movement, and inspired a vast wave of planning and building across the world during the 20th century. In the last quarter of the century, even as the foundational programmes of Europe and America lost their impetus, the baton was passed on to other countries, especially in eastern Asia, where the narrative of Modern mass housing was reinvigorated for the next century - a unique example of a key Modernist project that actually continues and thrives today, and which thus forms a principal focus of interest for DOCOMOMO – the leading international organisation promoting the documentation and conservation of buildings, sites and neighbourhoods of the Modern Movement. As heritage, the built legacies of this diverse and multi-generational adventure are almost always too controversial to qualify for conservation strategies. Instead, therefore, recording and inventorisation must dominate the heritage interest in this field. In the recognition of that fact, DOCOMOMO’s International Specialist Committee on Urbanism and Landscape, in partnership with the Scottish Centre for Conservation Studies at the University of Edinburgh, has launched the International Mass Housing Archive, whose aim is to provide an open-access library of images of significant housing projects in each working-group territory, free of copyright restrictions. These files may be copied, edited and shared on condition the appropriate citation is used, as per the terms of the attached Creative Commons Attribution licence. ### Structure ### The International Mass Housing Archive is subdivided under geographical headings corresponding to the constituent working groups of DOCOMOMO, and the individual housing projects are searchable under city and project name. Initially, the Image Archive will be managed and augmented centrally by DOCOMOMO and the SCCS, in partnership with University of Edinburgh Information Services, commencing with pilot city surveys sourced from our own photographic records in the first instance. The archive is related to several existing mass housing documentation initiatives. These include two concerning Britain, ‘Tower Block UK’ and the online version of the 1994 book, Tower Block: http://www.towerblock.eca.ed.ac.uk/ and http://fields.eca.ac.uk/gis/TowerBlock.pdf; and one concerning Hong Kong: see http://dx.doi.org/10.7488/ds/322 and http://www.hk.towerblock.eca.ed.ac.uk/list-of-estates .,In most cases the filename indicates the street and building. Where multiple photographs were taken at the same location, they may have the same filename; they are distinguished by a number in brackets at the end of the filename (the numbers in parentheses were added automatically by the Windows operating system).,
    Data Types:
    • Image
  • ### DOCOMOMO INTERNATIONAL MASS HOUSING ARCHIVE ### The provision of healthy modern housing for all was one of the foremost ideals of the Modern Movement, and inspired a vast wave of planning and building across the world during the 20th century. In the last quarter of the century, even as the foundational programmes of Europe and America lost their impetus, the baton was passed on to other countries, especially in eastern Asia, where the narrative of Modern mass housing was reinvigorated for the next century - a unique example of a key Modernist project that actually continues and thrives today, and which thus forms a principal focus of interest for DOCOMOMO – the leading international organisation promoting the documentation and conservation of buildings, sites and neighbourhoods of the Modern Movement. As heritage, the built legacies of this diverse and multi-generational adventure are almost always too controversial to qualify for conservation strategies. Instead, therefore, recording and inventorisation must dominate the heritage interest in this field. In the recognition of that fact, DOCOMOMO’s International Specialist Committee on Urbanism and Landscape, in partnership with the Scottish Centre for Conservation Studies at the University of Edinburgh, has launched the International Mass Housing Archive, whose aim is to provide an open-access library of images of significant housing projects in each working-group territory, free of copyright restrictions. These files may be copied, edited and shared on condition the appropriate citation is used, as per the terms of the attached Creative Commons Attribution licence. ### Structure ### The International Mass Housing Archive is subdivided under geographical headings corresponding to the constituent working groups of DOCOMOMO, and the individual housing projects are searchable under city and project name. Initially, the Image Archive will be managed and augmented centrally by DOCOMOMO and the SCCS, in partnership with University of Edinburgh Information Services, commencing with pilot city surveys sourced from our own photographic records in the first instance. The archive is related to several existing mass housing documentation initiatives. These include two concerning Britain, ‘Tower Block UK’ and the online version of the 1994 book, Tower Block: http://www.towerblock.eca.ed.ac.uk/ and http://fields.eca.ac.uk/gis/TowerBlock.pdf; and one concerning Hong Kong: see http://dx.doi.org/10.7488/ds/322 and http://www.hk.towerblock.eca.ed.ac.uk/list-of-estates .,In most cases the filename indicates the street and building. Where multiple photographs were taken at the same location, they may have the same filename; they are distinguished by a number in brackets at the end of the filename (the numbers in parentheses were added automatically by the Windows operating system).,
    Data Types:
    • Image
  • We use moving light patterns to control the motion of Escherichia coli bacteria whose motility is photoactivated. Varying the pattern speed controls the magnitude and direction of the bacterial flux, and therefore the accumulation of cells in up- and down-stream reservoirs. We validate our results with two-dimensional simulations and a 1-dimensional analytic model, and use these to explore parameter space. We find that cell accumulation is controlled by a competition between directed flux and undirected, stochastic transport. Our results point to a number of design principles for using moving light patterns and light-activated micro-swimmers in a range of practical applications.
    Data Types:
    • Image
  • ### DOCOMOMO INTERNATIONAL MASS HOUSING ARCHIVE ### The provision of healthy modern housing for all was one of the foremost ideals of the Modern Movement, and inspired a vast wave of planning and building across the world during the 20th century. In the last quarter of the century, even as the foundational programmes of Europe and America lost their impetus, the baton was passed on to other countries, especially in eastern Asia, where the narrative of Modern mass housing was reinvigorated for the next century - a unique example of a key Modernist project that actually continues and thrives today, and which thus forms a principal focus of interest for DOCOMOMO – the leading international organisation promoting the documentation and conservation of buildings, sites and neighbourhoods of the Modern Movement. As heritage, the built legacies of this diverse and multi-generational adventure are almost always too controversial to qualify for conservation strategies. Instead, therefore, recording and inventorisation must dominate the heritage interest in this field. In the recognition of that fact, DOCOMOMO’s International Specialist Committee on Urbanism and Landscape, in partnership with the Scottish Centre for Conservation Studies at the University of Edinburgh, has launched the International Mass Housing Archive, whose aim is to provide an open-access library of images of significant housing projects in each working-group territory, free of copyright restrictions. These files may be copied, edited and shared on condition the appropriate citation is used, as per the terms of the attached Creative Commons Attribution licence. ### Structure ### The International Mass Housing Archive is subdivided under geographical headings corresponding to the constituent working groups of DOCOMOMO, and the individual housing projects are searchable under city and project name. Initially, the Image Archive will be managed and augmented centrally by DOCOMOMO and the SCCS, in partnership with University of Edinburgh Information Services, commencing with pilot city surveys sourced from our own photographic records in the first instance. The archive is related to several existing mass housing documentation initiatives. These include two concerning Britain, ‘Tower Block UK’ and the online version of the 1994 book, Tower Block: http://www.towerblock.eca.ed.ac.uk/ and http://fields.eca.ac.uk/gis/TowerBlock.pdf; and one concerning Hong Kong: see http://dx.doi.org/10.7488/ds/322 and http://www.hk.towerblock.eca.ed.ac.uk/list-of-estates .,In most cases the filename indicates the street and building. Where multiple photographs were taken at the same location, they may have the same filename; they are distinguished by a number in brackets at the end of the filename (the numbers in parentheses were added automatically by the Windows operating system).,
    Data Types:
    • Image
  • ### DOCOMOMO INTERNATIONAL MASS HOUSING ARCHIVE ### The provision of healthy modern housing for all was one of the foremost ideals of the Modern Movement, and inspired a vast wave of planning and building across the world during the 20th century. In the last quarter of the century, even as the foundational programmes of Europe and America lost their impetus, the baton was passed on to other countries, especially in eastern Asia, where the narrative of Modern mass housing was reinvigorated for the next century - a unique example of a key Modernist project that actually continues and thrives today, and which thus forms a principal focus of interest for DOCOMOMO – the leading international organisation promoting the documentation and conservation of buildings, sites and neighbourhoods of the Modern Movement. As heritage, the built legacies of this diverse and multi-generational adventure are almost always too controversial to qualify for conservation strategies. Instead, therefore, recording and inventorisation must dominate the heritage interest in this field. In the recognition of that fact, DOCOMOMO’s International Specialist Committee on Urbanism and Landscape, in partnership with the Scottish Centre for Conservation Studies at the University of Edinburgh, has launched the International Mass Housing Archive, whose aim is to provide an open-access library of images of significant housing projects in each working-group territory, free of copyright restrictions. These files may be copied, edited and shared on condition the appropriate citation is used, as per the terms of the attached Creative Commons Attribution licence. ### Structure ### The International Mass Housing Archive is subdivided under geographical headings corresponding to the constituent working groups of DOCOMOMO, and the individual housing projects are searchable under city and project name. Initially, the Image Archive will be managed and augmented centrally by DOCOMOMO and the SCCS, in partnership with University of Edinburgh Information Services, commencing with pilot city surveys sourced from our own photographic records in the first instance. The archive is related to several existing mass housing documentation initiatives. These include two concerning Britain, ‘Tower Block UK’ and the online version of the 1994 book, Tower Block: http://www.towerblock.eca.ed.ac.uk/ and http://fields.eca.ac.uk/gis/TowerBlock.pdf; and one concerning Hong Kong: see https://doi.org/10.7488/ds/322 and http://www.hk.towerblock.eca.ed.ac.uk/list-of-estates .,In most cases the filename indicates the street and building. Where multiple photographs were taken at the same location, they may have the same filename; they are distinguished by a number in brackets at the end of the filename (the numbers in parentheses were added automatically by the Windows operating system).,
    Data Types:
    • Image
  • ### DOCOMOMO INTERNATIONAL MASS HOUSING ARCHIVE ### The provision of healthy modern housing for all was one of the foremost ideals of the Modern Movement, and inspired a vast wave of planning and building across the world during the 20th century. In the last quarter of the century, even as the foundational programmes of Europe and America lost their impetus, the baton was passed on to other countries, especially in eastern Asia, where the narrative of Modern mass housing was reinvigorated for the next century - a unique example of a key Modernist project that actually continues and thrives today, and which thus forms a principal focus of interest for DOCOMOMO – the leading international organisation promoting the documentation and conservation of buildings, sites and neighbourhoods of the Modern Movement. As heritage, the built legacies of this diverse and multi-generational adventure are almost always too controversial to qualify for conservation strategies. Instead, therefore, recording and inventorisation must dominate the heritage interest in this field. In the recognition of that fact, DOCOMOMO’s International Specialist Committee on Urbanism and Landscape, in partnership with the Scottish Centre for Conservation Studies at the University of Edinburgh, has launched the International Mass Housing Archive, whose aim is to provide an open-access library of images of significant housing projects in each working-group territory, free of copyright restrictions. These files may be copied, edited and shared on condition the appropriate citation is used, as per the terms of the attached Creative Commons Attribution licence. ### Structure ### The International Mass Housing Archive is subdivided under geographical headings corresponding to the constituent working groups of DOCOMOMO, and the individual housing projects are searchable under city and project name. Initially, the Image Archive will be managed and augmented centrally by DOCOMOMO and the SCCS, in partnership with University of Edinburgh Information Services, commencing with pilot city surveys sourced from our own photographic records in the first instance. The archive is related to several existing mass housing documentation initiatives. These include two concerning Britain, ‘Tower Block UK’ and the online version of the 1994 book, Tower Block: http://www.towerblock.eca.ed.ac.uk/ and http://fields.eca.ac.uk/gis/TowerBlock.pdf; and one concerning Hong Kong: see http://dx.doi.org/10.7488/ds/322 and http://www.hk.towerblock.eca.ed.ac.uk/list-of-estates .,In most cases the filename indicates the street and building. Where multiple photographs were taken at the same location, they may have the same filename; they are distinguished by a number in brackets at the end of the filename (the numbers in parentheses were added automatically by the Windows operating system).,
    Data Types:
    • Image
  • Multi-storey block details: five 19-storey blocks containing 360 dwellings; Multi-storey block name(s): Kings Court SC48; Elphinstone Court SC49; St Machar Court SC50; Grandholm Court SC51; Donside Court SC52 ; Image detail: View of the interior of Grandholm Court Original Commissioning Authority Aberdeen Burgh Council; Construction period (from/to): 1965 1968 Context: Tower Block UK is a project supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, bringing together public engagement and an openly-licensed image archive in an attempt to emphasise the social and architectural importance of tower blocks, and to frame multi-storey social housing as a coherent and accessible nationwide heritage. The Tower Block UK image archive is a searchable database of around 4,000 images of every multi-storey social housing development built in the UK. The photographs were largely taken in the 1980s by Miles Glendinning and are made available here for public use. As many of the blocks documented and photographed have since been demolished, the archive functions in part as a repository of information on an important aspect of UK heritage that is now vanishing. The archive itself catalogues multi-storey blocks as part of the developments within which they were initially commissioned and built. It gives details of notable dates, such as when local authorities approved the developments and when construction began or finished. Alongside this, the archive provides information on the local authorities, architects, and other agents involved in the processes of commissioning, designing, and constructing mass social housing. While the most historically 'accurate' identification labels in the database are the original overall development or project names, the archive also contains details of the individual blocks built.
    Data Types:
    • Image
  • ### DOCOMOMO INTERNATIONAL MASS HOUSING ARCHIVE ### The provision of healthy modern housing for all was one of the foremost ideals of the Modern Movement, and inspired a vast wave of planning and building across the world during the 20th century. In the last quarter of the century, even as the foundational programmes of Europe and America lost their impetus, the baton was passed on to other countries, especially in eastern Asia, where the narrative of Modern mass housing was reinvigorated for the next century - a unique example of a key Modernist project that actually continues and thrives today, and which thus forms a principal focus of interest for DOCOMOMO – the leading international organisation promoting the documentation and conservation of buildings, sites and neighbourhoods of the Modern Movement. As heritage, the built legacies of this diverse and multi-generational adventure are almost always too controversial to qualify for conservation strategies. Instead, therefore, recording and inventorisation must dominate the heritage interest in this field. In the recognition of that fact, DOCOMOMO’s International Specialist Committee on Urbanism and Landscape, in partnership with the Scottish Centre for Conservation Studies at the University of Edinburgh, has launched the International Mass Housing Archive, whose aim is to provide an open-access library of images of significant housing projects in each working-group territory, free of copyright restrictions. These files may be copied, edited and shared on condition the appropriate citation is used, as per the terms of the attached Creative Commons Attribution licence. ### Structure ### The International Mass Housing Archive is subdivided under geographical headings corresponding to the constituent working groups of DOCOMOMO, and the individual housing projects are searchable under city and project name. Initially, the Image Archive will be managed and augmented centrally by DOCOMOMO and the SCCS, in partnership with University of Edinburgh Information Services, commencing with pilot city surveys sourced from our own photographic records in the first instance. The archive is related to several existing mass housing documentation initiatives. These include two concerning Britain, ‘Tower Block UK’ and the online version of the 1994 book, Tower Block: http://www.towerblock.eca.ed.ac.uk/ and http://fields.eca.ac.uk/gis/TowerBlock.pdf; and one concerning Hong Kong: see http://dx.doi.org/10.7488/ds/322 and http://www.hk.towerblock.eca.ed.ac.uk/list-of-estates .,In most cases the filename indicates the street and building. Where multiple photographs were taken at the same location, they may have the same filename; they are distinguished by a number in brackets at the end of the filename (the numbers in parentheses were added automatically by the Windows operating system).,
    Data Types:
    • Image