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  • “Mental health is being rated as [one of the] top 3 issues in City of Greater Dandenong." “Young People voting mental health as the highest percentage (17.5% - Page 2, Youth Summit 2018).” Anonymous This photograph featured in the Youth Booth exhibition showcasing the work of 10 Victorian young people produced over the 2019-2020 Australian summer. Their work captures their collective experience: being digitally savvy, the stress of study, influence of social media, climate change and the impact of poor mental health. These perspectives, along with our video series produced alongside this, allow us to see the complex situations that impact the youth experience of education. For schools, teachers, parents and policy-makers it highlights the importance of listening and collaboration with young people, particularly when developing policies and implementing practice to build more inclusive communities. For researchers, we hope this exhibition highlights one way to use participatory visual research methods to support and strengthen the voice of youth. The exhibition adopts a rights-based perspective which emphasises the importance not only of listening to youth, but actively and authentically collaborating on matters that directly affect them. The study was conducted by researchers Dr Christine Grove and Louisa Trainer in 2019-2020 at Monash University and is funded by the Monash Education Small Grant Award.
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  • Thoracic, hepatic and mesenteric lymph flow in rats over time
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  • “In this photo all the smoke from bushfires across parts of Australia has moved a long way showing how severe these fires really are.” “This relates to our lives as the smoky air prevents us from going outside and enjoying fresh air. It keeps us inside making it really hard to enjoy the outside world.” “This problem has grown from climate change. Because our weather is becoming a lot warmer, Australia is becoming prone to more bushfires resulting in people losing homes, lives and family.” “To overcome this problem the smallest things could make a difference. Donating to causes that can help firefighters or affected families could make the difference. We could also do small things like switching to more eco-friendly solutions. If we don’t acknowledge this issue it may only get worse.” Photographer: Abhi Kariamal This photograph featured in the Youth Booth exhibition showcasing the work of 10 Victorian young people produced over the 2019-2020 Australian summer. Their work captures their collective experience: being digitally savvy, the stress of study, influence of social media, climate change and the impact of poor mental health. These perspectives, along with our video series produced alongside this, allow us to see the complex situations that impact the youth experience of education. For schools, teachers, parents and policy-makers it highlights the importance of listening and collaboration with young people, particularly when developing policies and implementing practice to build more inclusive communities. For researchers, we hope this exhibition highlights one way to use participatory visual research methods to support and strengthen the voice of youth. The exhibition adopts a rights-based perspective which emphasises the importance not only of listening to youth, but actively and authentically collaborating on matters that directly affect them. The study was conducted by researchers Dr Christine Grove and Louisa Trainer in 2019-2020 at Monash University and is funded by the Monash Education Small Grant Award.
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  • “Expectations I have for my peers and teachers … the goals I will try and aim for this year.” “Thinking carefully not to expect too much or too less from myself and others.” “We place down rules and have borders to protect ourselves as well as others to try and unlock our potential.” “This exists so that we can be in a safe learning environment.” Photographer: Tamika Nguyen This photograph featured in the Youth Booth exhibition showcasing the work of 10 Victorian young people produced over the 2019-2020 Australian summer. Their work captures their collective experience: being digitally savvy, the stress of study, influence of social media, climate change and the impact of poor mental health. These perspectives, along with our video series produced alongside this, allow us to see the complex situations that impact the youth experience of education. For schools, teachers, parents and policy-makers it highlights the importance of listening and collaboration with young people, particularly when developing policies and implementing practice to build more inclusive communities. For researchers, we hope this exhibition highlights one way to use participatory visual research methods to support and strengthen the voice of youth. The exhibition adopts a rights-based perspective which emphasises the importance not only of listening to youth, but actively and authentically collaborating on matters that directly affect them. The study was conducted by researchers Dr Christine Grove and Louisa Trainer in 2019-2020 at Monash University and is funded by the Monash Education Small Grant Award.
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  • “This photo shows a man/boy looking into the mirror seeing he has no muscles. A phone next to him shows how muscular someone else is.” “Many teens, almost all, compare their intelligence and appearance to other people. There is a line separating popular and non-popular. Everyone wants to be popular so they compare themselves to them and try to be like them.” “Be yourself, you’re you and we love you for who you are.” Artist: Nikith Udayakuma This photograph featured in the Youth Booth exhibition showcasing the work of 10 Victorian young people produced over the 2019-2020 Australian summer. Their work captures their collective experience: being digitally savvy, the stress of study, influence of social media, climate change and the impact of poor mental health. These perspectives, along with our video series produced alongside this, allow us to see the complex situations that impact the youth experience of education.For schools, teachers, parents and policy-makers it highlights the importance of listening and collaboration with young people, particularly when developing policies and implementing practice to build more inclusive communities. For researchers, we hope this exhibition highlights one way to use participatory visual research methods to support and strengthen the voice of youth.The exhibition adopts a rights-based perspective which emphasises the importance not only of listening to youth, but actively and authentically collaborating on matters that directly affect them.The study was conducted by researchers Dr Christine Grove and Louisa Trainer in 2019-2020 at Monash University and is funded by the Monash Education Small Grant Award.
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  • “This image represents the tangled and confusing lives of young people and the ways that we are able to manage them.” “In this day and age, many young people feel like they must do everything for fear of missing out. This is sometimes fueled by pressure from family and friends.” “We can be supportive to our friends and help them to understand that it is ok to say no to things. We can also listen to what is best for ourselves to ensure that we don’t overload.” Photographer: Liz Solly This photograph featured in the Youth Booth exhibition showcasing the work of 10 Victorian young people produced over the 2019-2020 Australian summer. Their work captures their collective experience: being digitally savvy, the stress of study, influence of social media, climate change and the impact of poor mental health. These perspectives, along with our video series produced alongside this, allow us to see the complex situations that impact the youth experience of education. For schools, teachers, parents and policy-makers it highlights the importance of listening and collaboration with young people, particularly when developing policies and implementing practice to build more inclusive communities. For researchers, we hope this exhibition highlights one way to use participatory visual research methods to support and strengthen the voice of youth. The exhibition adopts a rights-based perspective which emphasises the importance not only of listening to youth, but actively and authentically collaborating on matters that directly affect them. The study was conducted by researchers Dr Christine Grove and Louisa Trainer in 2019-2020 at Monash University and is funded by the Monash Education Small Grant Award.
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  • “I drew up a little something that represents an issue that kids face everyday. This one shows exclusion.” Artist: Abhi Kariamal This photograph featured in the Youth Booth exhibition showcasing the work of 10 Victorian young people produced over the 2019-2020 Australian summer. Their work captures their collective experience: being digitally savvy, the stress of study, influence of social media, climate change and the impact of poor mental health. These perspectives, along with our video series produced alongside this, allow us to see the complex situations that impact the youth experience of education. For schools, teachers, parents and policy-makers it highlights the importance of listening and collaboration with young people, particularly when developing policies and implementing practice to build more inclusive communities. For researchers, we hope this exhibition highlights one way to use participatory visual research methods to support and strengthen the voice of youth. The exhibition adopts a rights-based perspective which emphasises the importance not only of listening to youth, but actively and authentically collaborating on matters that directly affect them. The study was conducted by researchers Dr Christine Grove and Louisa Trainer in 2019-2020 at Monash University and is funded by the Monash Education Small Grant Award.
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  • “What is contained in this letter is the number of my psychology study score [it] shows the effort that i have put in to achieve.” “This number impacts my ATAR which is the so-called determinant number that allows to me get into the course I want, to finally study or do something that I am truly passionate about that isn’t just filler subjects to just fill the requirement.” “Children/students these days do truly worry about these numbers … teachers want you to do the best that you can … but when we are so fixated on these numbers and so worried about them do we really peak or do the best?” Photographer: Sahnly Phan Chan This photograph featured in the Youth Booth exhibition showcasing the work of 10 Victorian young people produced over the 2019-2020 Australian summer. Their work captures their collective experience: being digitally savvy, the stress of study, influence of social media, climate change and the impact of poor mental health. These perspectives, along with our video series produced alongside this, allow us to see the complex situations that impact the youth experience of education. For schools, teachers, parents and policy-makers it highlights the importance of listening and collaboration with young people, particularly when developing policies and implementing practice to build more inclusive communities. For researchers, we hope this exhibition highlights one way to use participatory visual research methods to support and strengthen the voice of youth. The exhibition adopts a rights-based perspective which emphasises the importance not only of listening to youth, but actively and authentically collaborating on matters that directly affect them. The study was conducted by researchers Dr Christine Grove and Louisa Trainer in 2019-2020 at Monash University and is funded by the Monash Education Small Grant Award. This photograph featured in the Youth Booth exhibition showcasing the work of 10 Victorian young people produced over the 2019-2020 Australian summer. Their work captures their collective experience: being digitally savvy, the stress of study, influence of social media, climate change and the impact of poor mental health. These perspectives, along with our video series produced alongside this, allow us to see the complex situations that impact the youth experience of education. For schools, teachers, parents and policy-makers it highlights the importance of listening and collaboration with young people, particularly when developing policies and implementing practice to build more inclusive communities. For researchers, we hope this exhibition highlights one way to use participatory visual research methods to support and strengthen the voice of youth. The exhibition adopts a rights-based perspective which emphasises the importance not only of listening to youth, but actively and authentically collaborating on matters that directly affect them. The study was conducted by researchers Dr Christine Grove and Louisa Trainer in 2019-2020 at Monash University and is funded by the Monash Education Small Grant Award.
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  • “The waves are really strong today and surfers are making the most of it.” “Even when they are knocked over or wiped out they still get up and continue to surf.” “This relates to the strength of resilience, even when we are knocked down, we are able to get up again. This strength exists because we have been brought up with many challenges in our lives ... one of the main strengths among today’s young people is resilience.” “We can support those who are experiencing challenges and provide them with the support they need to overcome the problems that they might face to help build their resilience.” Photographer: Liz Solly This photograph featured in the Youth Booth exhibition showcasing the work of 10 Victorian young people produced over the 2019-2020 Australian summer. Their work captures their collective experience: being digitally savvy, the stress of study, influence of social media, climate change and the impact of poor mental health. These perspectives, along with our video series produced alongside this, allow us to see the complex situations that impact the youth experience of education. For schools, teachers, parents and policy-makers it highlights the importance of listening and collaboration with young people, particularly when developing policies and implementing practice to build more inclusive communities. For researchers, we hope this exhibition highlights one way to use participatory visual research methods to support and strengthen the voice of youth. The exhibition adopts a rights-based perspective which emphasises the importance not only of listening to youth, but actively and authentically collaborating on matters that directly affect them. The study was conducted by researchers Dr Christine Grove and Louisa Trainer in 2019-2020 at Monash University and is funded by the Monash Education Small Grant Award.
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  • VALA2020 ePresentation titled (with abstract below): Creating an innovative collection to impact the practice of 21st Century teachers AUTHORS AND AFFILIATIONS Helfrich, S1, Pilz, S2 1 Monash University, Clayton, Australia2 Monash University, Clayton, Australia Samantha Helfrich; Monash University; Monash University Library; Subject Librarian; Wellington Road, Clayton, VIC, 3168, Australia; 03 9902 4284; samantha.helfrich@monash.edu Sylvia Pilz; Monash University; Monash University Library; Subject Librarian; Wellington Road, Clayton, VIC, 3168, Australia; 03 9902 2663; sylvia.pilz@monash.edu ABSTRACT The Teaching Materials Collection (TMC) within the Monash University Library is a small, specialised collection, which was originally inherited from the Faculty of Education. This project was created to manage and redevelop the TMC. This collection has been a challenge primarily because it sits outside of the general and special collections practices of the University library system. The TMC has sat unchanged and under-utilised for many years. This project began as a way of addressing these underlying issues, and to promote these resources to the Faculty of Education staff. The long term goal of this collection redevelopment is to better inform and support the teaching and learning practices of students undertaking undergraduate and postgraduate qualifications in early childhood, primary, and secondary teaching practice. The library team has reviewed best practices and evaluated our current resources in the field, as part of this project over the past year. Our aim is to develop a collection that is inclusive, and reflective of current and future teaching practices that adopts a holistic, progressive and agile approach to resource management. We look to achieve this through collaboration with stakeholders within the library and University faculties, and the integration of technology and other modern educational resources that are relevant to the development of the skills that students will need to prepare them for employment in both traditional and increasingly digital environments. The collection has been benchmarked against comparative collections at other tertiary institutions and local school libraries. Moreover, library staff collaborated with academics to embed resources within their unit curriculum, review collection resources and create work integrated learning programs to explicitly tie skill development to library resources. We have looked for ways to integrate best practice into the TMC, and develop procedures specifically for this specialised collection. The goal of this project is to create an innovative collection through a review of the literature and comparative collections, to develop a set of flexible procedures that will allow the library to respond to changes in the curriculum and professional outcomes. While overall, making both traditional teaching resources and digital technologies available to all students. Where these resources are more accessible and relevant to students who will be teaching in a twenty-first century classroom. While this project is ongoing, the redevelopment of this collection and the acquired resources will endeavour to make both traditional teaching resources and digital technologies available to all students through an open and accessible collection. CONFERENCE CONCEPTTechnology and social good through open and accessible collections.
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