Filter Results
221 results
Interviewee: Jeff Guido Interviewers: Stefano Alonzi, Sean Connell, Patrick Clancy Date: October 10, 2017 Location: History Department Office, Old Main, SUNY Cortland, Cortland, New York Length: 47:01 Jeff Guido was born in Cortland, New York on April 25, 1968 and has lived here his whole life. His mother’s grandmother emigrated here from England in the early 19th century with her older sister. Jeff’s family was involved in the industrial growth of Cortland during the economic boom. His great grandmother worked within the 1890 House, which at the time was the home of the Wickwire family, who were the owners of the Wickwire factory. His grandfather was an established factory worker, who climbed in the ranks until he had almost 400 people under him. His father was born in Clinton, New York, and completed university degree at SUNY Cortland where he met Jeff’s mother. His father worked as a teacher at Homer High School for many years, and his mother worked in a doctor’s office in Cortland. Jeff followed the footsteps of his father and graduated from Cortland High School, and continued his post secondary degree, studying History at SUNY Oswego. He completed his Teaching certification at SUNY Cortland and now works at Cortland High School. Jeff currently lives in Cortland, New York with his wife and three daughters and is an active member in the community. Jeff explains the obvious change in demographics that Cortland has seen through the industrial boom and the evident decline in economic wealth. He highlights the factories value to the Cortland community during the early stages of industrialization and how it shaped the town. Jeff held a position on City Council for 2 terms, which allowed him to understand the issues raised by the population of Cortland. He brings awareness to the importance of the university in this small community and its value to the town of Cortland...
Data Types:
  • Audio
What is “research data” for music researchers and performers? How can music librarians develop their knowledge and skills to better meet the research data needs of their constituents, and contribute to the data-intensive turn in academia? This panel will explore the research data movement in libraries and its relevance to music librarians. Panelists will examine the diversity of music research from a data-oriented perspective, and provide examples of these data as drawn from case studies of various music research projects. We will discuss who creates the data, and how it is used, reused, shared, and discovered, as well as the types of music data appropriate for deposit in an institutional repository. Examples of topics covered will include personal archiving, institutional repository guidelines for data, ethical and intellectual property rights considerations, and the role of research data in music digital humanities projects. Attendees will gain an understanding of how music librarians can participate in research data services at their institutions, as well an understanding of the expertise they can contribute to data-related conversations. Panelists include Amy Jackson, Director of Instruction and Outreach at the University of New Mexico, Sean Luyk, Digital Initiatives Projects Librarian at the University of Alberta, Francesca Giannetti, Digital Humanities Librarian at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, Anna E. Kijas, Senior Digital Scholarship Librarian at Boston College, and Jonathan Manton, Music Librarian for Access Services at Yale University. Remarks available at http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/1n89-ew85.
Data Types:
  • Image
Interviewee: Louise Swoyer Interviewer: Tristan Luccari, Julie Becker, Jasmine Sprauve Date: October 12, 2017 Location: Old Main, SUNY Cortland, Cortland, New York Length: 1 audio file, 00:41:46 Louise Swoyer grew up in Cortland along with her parents and two brothers. She has traveled across the United States, visiting and living in different places. While growing up in Cortland, her father would take the family on road trips, through upstate New York and even up into New England. She remembers the great time she had in school with her teachers and friends, and at home with her family. She specifically remembered her grandfather, tending his garden. Her Grandfather John, J.W. Evans, used to work at the Wickwire Factory in Cortland, N.Y, but doesn’t recall him working while she was young. Louise attended Cayuga College, in New York, and after that traveled a bit, before finally settling down in Columbus, Ohio, where her husband had taught at Ohio State University. She eventually would go onto teach at the University as well, after introducing the ‘Adopt a School program’ in the city. The impact that Louise has not only had on the people she came in contact with, but even children that benefitted from the actions that she had taken to encourage a better education, is remarkable. Louise currently lives in Phoenix, A.Z, but has recently returned to visit Cortland a few years ago. She explained how it looked awfully different, other than Main Street, which continues to look very similar.
Data Types:
  • Audio
Audio only.
Data Types:
  • Audio
How do students’ information literacy skills change over the course of their undergraduate education? We assume or at least hope they will improve. But do they? And if so, by how much? At the University of the Pacific, we are using the SAILS (Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills) Test to assess undergraduate students’ information literacy skills and to see how they have changed over time. The SAILS Test is a multiple-choice test that has been used by more than 200 universities across the world. According to their website, the SAILS Test can “determine how well your students can navigate the complex world of information” and can “identify strengths and weaknesses of your students' information literacy skills.” Librarians at Pacific administered the test to the same group of first year students in 2014-2015 and as seniors in 2017-2018. I presented the initial results, including data about first-year students, at the 2016 MLA national meeting. This presentation will be a follow-up with recent data from senior students. In addition to discovering how students’ skills have changed over time, the data will be disaggregated based on demographics, including major, gender, ethnicity, transfer status, and nationality, which will speak to the conference theme of diversity and inclusion. I will also discuss the ways in which we plan to use the data to further improve our students’ information literacy skills.
Data Types:
  • Image
In this dissertation, I present a method for developing tonal jazz pitch-listening skills (PLS) which is rooted in scientific experimental findings from the fields of music cognition and perception. Converging experimental evidence supports the notion that humans develop listening skills through implicit learning via immersive, statistically rich exposure to real music from a particular musical idiom, such as tonal jazz. Therefore, I recommend that to acquire tonal jazz pitch-listening skills, learners should (1) immerse themselves in the real music of that idiom, (2) remediate their listening skills, where necessary, by listening to slowed-down versions with exaggerated features, and (3) organize their listening experiences with explicit theoretical labels for particular pitch structures, if they want to communicate about those pitch structures in speech or writing. In order to aid in the practical application of this process, I offer a four-semester learning sequence for the development of tonal jazz pitch-listening skills as well as a variety of formal assessment methods.
Data Types:
  • Image
Poster presentation for 2019 United States Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Association annual conference. Just as dissertations are a requirement for most PhD programs, culminating recitals are a degree requirement for students in the University of Washington (UW) School of Music (SoM) Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) in Performance program. They represent significant contributions to UW’s creative and scholarly output, and the UW Music Library collected CD recordings of these recitals for many years. ​ As recording practices have become increasingly digital, fewer students have deposited recital CDs with the Music Library, and valuable institutional history and scholarly output is being lost. UW made the transition from physical to electronic theses and dissertations in 2012. With this pilot, we begin that transition for recital recordings.​
Data Types:
  • Image
Le mouvement féministe haïtien vient de célébrer ses 100 ans: occasion idéale pour réfléchir à la réalité des Haïtiennes, tout en y intégrant des courants de pensée européens, américains et panafricains.Le mouvement féministe haïtien vient de célébrer ses 100 ans: occasion idéale pour réfléchir à la réalité des Haïtiennes, tout en y intégrant des courants de pensée européens, américains et panafricains. Ce livre est construit sur le constat qu’Haïti et la Caraïbe ne peuvent faire l’économie de nouvelles pistes de réflexion dans un contexte où la situation des femmes ne cesse de se dégrader et où les acquis féministes sont constamment remis en question ou disqualifiés.
Data Types:
  • Image
Hashikuradera, the inner sanctuary of Kompira-san on Shikoku island, defied the Meiji government and has kept Buddhism and Shinto on the same hallway to this day. This old map depicts the syncretic divinity Kompira Daigongen whirling through the air from Kompira-san or Elephant's Head Mountain (upper left) to meet Kukai, just labeled the great saint (lower right).
Data Types:
  • Image
There is an urgent need for social justice. This need expands far beyond the walls of an information literacy classroom, but there is important work that can be done in these spaces. Lessons designed to stimulate student’s critical thinking about their personal assumptions and latent biases by using different kinds of information sources is one way music and instruction librarians can advance equity and inclusion through teaching. In this active-learning session, attendees will participate in several condensed lessons designed to challenge their worldview in order to facilitate the uncovering of unknown biases. At the same time, they will learn pedagogical techniques for the information literacy classroom by experiencing them first hand. The activities will include conceptualizing disability in the arts, investigating bias in the music industry, and examining reference works to uncover hegemony in the historiography of the canon. All activities will push participants (and hopefully their future students) to think critically about information, especially music and the arts, through the lens of diversity, inclusion, and social justice.
Data Types:
  • Image