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Presentation to the tutors at the University of Cape Town Writing Centre on 06 February 2020. This presentation covers an introduction of Wikipedia, and how it can effectively be used by students for research.
Data Types:
  • Video
This file set consists of oblique views of 3D models of the Gede ruins archaeological site. The views were generated from 3D models created using laser scanning and photogrammetric techniques. The ruins of Gede (also Gedi), a traditional Arab-African Swahili town, are located just off Kenya’s coastline, some 90km north of Mombasa. Gede was a small town built entirely from stones and rocks, and most of the original foundations are still visible today. Remaining structures at the site include coral stone buildings, mosques, houses and a palace. The town was abandoned in the early 17th century, and Gede’s buildings date back to the 15th century, although it is believed that the site could have been inhabited as early as the 11th or 12th century. The Zamani Project spatially documented the Gede ruins in 2010. In addition to the three principal structures of the Great Mosque, the Small Mosque and the Palace, remains of other structures in the immediate vicinity were also documented. The Zamani Project seeks to increase awareness and knowledge of tangible cultural heritage in Africa and internationally by creating metrically accurate digital representations of historical sites. Digital spatial data of cultural heritage sites can be used for research and education, for restoration and conservation and as a record for future generations. The Zamani Project operates as a non-profit organisation within the University of Cape Town. This text has been adapted from the UNESCO website (https://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/5501/). The Zamani Project received funding from the Andrew W Mellon Foundation at the time of the project.
Data Types:
  • Image
This Presentation was given as an Opening Address at UCT Open Data Day on 6 March 2020.
Data Types:
  • Video
Presentation for UCT's Open Data Day held on the 06 March 2020. The presentation focuses on open government data for SDG reporting in African countries.
Data Types:
  • Video
Summary ROC plot of sensitivity versus specificity of handheld echocardiography for definite RHD generated for meta-analysis in the systematic review: Standard echocardiography versus handheld echocardiography for the detection of subclinical rheumatic heart disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic accuracy PROSPERO registration number: CRD42016051261 Plot was generated using the Review Manager (RevMan) software package, version 5.3. Meta-analysis was performed using SAS® software, version 9.4.
Data Types:
  • Image
This presentation was given at UCT's Open Data Day on 6th March 2020. The presentation outlines the utility of repeat photography in understanding changing landscapes, through citizen science. Historical landscape photographs are scientifically valuable evidence of what landscapes looked like in the past and can be a useful source of biodiversity data in otherwise data-deficient geographic regions. Acquiring repeats of historical photographs on broad geographic scales is possible through rePhotoSA, a collaborative citizen science project led by the Plant Conservation Unit and the FitzPatrick Institute at UCT, which hosts an open online repository of historical landscape images.
Data Types:
  • Video
This file set consists of elevations of 3D models of the Palace at the Gede ruins archaeological site. The elevations were generated from 3D models created using laser scanning and photogrammetric techniques. The ruins of Gede (also Gedi), a traditional Arab-African Swahili town, are located just off Kenya’s coastline, some 90km north of Mombasa. Gede was a small town built entirely from stones and rocks, and most of the original foundations are still visible today. Remaining structures at the site include coral stone buildings, mosques, houses and a palace. The town was abandoned in the early 17th century, and Gede’s buildings date back to the 15th century, although it is believed that the site could have been inhabited as early as the 11th or 12th century. The Zamani Project spatially documented the Gede ruins in 2010. In addition to the three principal structures of the Great Mosque, the Small Mosque and the Palace, remains of other structures in the immediate vicinity were also documented. The Zamani Project seeks to increase awareness and knowledge of tangible cultural heritage in Africa and internationally by creating metrically accurate digital representations of historical sites. Digital spatial data of cultural heritage sites can be used for research and education, for restoration and conservation and as a record for future generations. The Zamani Project operates as a non-profit organisation within the University of Cape Town. This text has been adapted from the UNESCO website (https://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/5501/). The Zamani Project received funding from the Andrew W Mellon Foundation at the time of the project.
Data Types:
  • Image
This file set consists of sections of 3D models of the Small Mosque at the Gede ruins archaeological site. The sections were generated from 3D models created using laser scanning and photogrammetric techniques. The ruins of Gede (also Gedi), a traditional Arab-African Swahili town, are located just off Kenya’s coastline, some 90km north of Mombasa. Gede was a small town built entirely from stones and rocks, and most of the original foundations are still visible today. Remaining structures at the site include coral stone buildings, mosques, houses and a palace. The town was abandoned in the early 17th century, and Gede’s buildings date back to the 15th century, although it is believed that the site could have been inhabited as early as the 11th or 12th century. The Zamani Project spatially documented the Gede ruins in 2010. In addition to the three principal structures of the Great Mosque, the Small Mosque and the Palace, remains of other structures in the immediate vicinity were also documented. The Zamani Project seeks to increase awareness and knowledge of tangible cultural heritage in Africa and internationally by creating metrically accurate digital representations of historical sites. Digital spatial data of cultural heritage sites can be used for research and education, for restoration and conservation and as a record for future generations. The Zamani Project operates as a non-profit organisation within the University of Cape Town. This text has been adapted from the UNESCO website (https://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/5501/). The Zamani Project received funding from the Andrew W Mellon Foundation at the time of the project.
Data Types:
  • Image
This file set consists of oblique views of 3D models of the Palace at the Gede ruins archaeological site. The oblique views were generated from 3D models created using laser scanning and photogrammetric techniques. The ruins of Gede (also Gedi), a traditional Arab-African Swahili town, are located just off Kenya’s coastline, some 90km north of Mombasa. Gede was a small town built entirely from stones and rocks, and most of the original foundations are still visible today. Remaining structures at the site include coral stone buildings, mosques, houses and a palace. The town was abandoned in the early 17th century, and Gede’s buildings date back to the 15th century, although it is believed that the site could have been inhabited as early as the 11th or 12th century. The Zamani Project spatially documented the Gede ruins in 2010. In addition to the three principal structures of the Great Mosque, the Small Mosque and the Palace, remains of other structures in the immediate vicinity were also documented. The Zamani Project seeks to increase awareness and knowledge of tangible cultural heritage in Africa and internationally by creating metrically accurate digital representations of historical sites. Digital spatial data of cultural heritage sites can be used for research and education, for restoration and conservation and as a record for future generations. The Zamani Project operates as a non-profit organisation within the University of Cape Town. This text has been adapted from the UNESCO website (https://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/5501/). The Zamani Project received funding from the Andrew W Mellon Foundation at the time of the project.
Data Types:
  • Image
Presentation to the tutors at the University of Cape Town Writing Centre on 06 February 2020. This presentation covers an introduction of Wikipedia, and how it can effectively be used by students for research.
Data Types:
  • Video