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The bibliography of Lanthanotus is a chronological listing of published references of substance to Lanthanotus as of June 2018. I have not included citations that are extremely peripheral (e.g., a book that includes a sentence such as “This feature is found only in some varanids and the earless monitor,” and no other comment on the species). The bibliography is arranged chronologically in order to provide a thorough history of the published knowledge on Lanthanotus. Each citation is followed by annotations of the content of that publication. Where possible, each annotation includes when and how many specimens were acquired, which specimens were used for the study, and when research trends in took occurred.
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NMNH
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SI-Libraries
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What do curators do? What hands-on skills should a graduate student acquire in order to prepare for a career working in museums or similar cultural heritage archives? How do the theoretical debates within various humanities and social science disciplines connect to the practical work that curators and other museum or archives professionals pursue? Complementing other Indiana University—Bloomington courses concerned with (1) museum history and theory, (2) museum exhibitions, (3) nonprofit administration, and (4) informal education. Curatorship is a graduate seminar aimed at concurrently teaching fundamental skills basic to curatorial work and exploring the ways that theoretical, ethical, and methodological problems are worked out in the day-to-day work of museums of art, ethnography, archaeology, and history, as well as in the kinds of archives and media repositories that serve a range of humanities and social science disciplines. The course will include hands-on activities, seminar discussion, and original research opportunities. While exhibitions will come up in the course of seminar meetings, the foci of the class are all of the other areas relevant to professional curatorial work in museums, particularly those domains related to the larger place of systematic collections in museum practice. These span a range of topics from donation and purchase to collections care, research, and deaccession. Such matters as the problem of authenticity and the role of museums in art markets will be taken up in the context of the practical challenges (and pleasures) of curatorial work. Along with practical curatorial skills of wide relevance, the course will explore issues of common concern not only for museums, but also for related kinds of heritage archives, including ethnographic sound archives, archaeological repositories, and folklore collections.
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This is an undergraduate course for non-anthropology majors that fulfills a general education requirement. For many students, this is the only anthropology class they will take. The course rotates among three or four faculty. The course rotates among three or four faculty. When I teach the course, I use objects to illustrate several lectures. Materials come from my personal collection of objects from the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania and from the UW-Madison department's ethnography collection.
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This course is an elective for museum studies students that also meets an “advanced seminar” requirement for the Anthropology Masters and Ph.D. Graduate Programs. This course is an elective for museum studies students that also meets an “advanced seminar” requirement for the Anthropology Masters and Ph.D. Graduate Programs. My goal for the course was for students to digest the major tenets of recent scholarship in material culture studies and apply that knowledge to developing public programming ideas with a focus on museum collections.
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NH-Anthropology
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Forest biomass is an essential indicator for monitoring the Earth's ecosystems and climate. It is a critical input to greenhouse gas accounting, estimation of carbon losses and forest degradation, assessment of renewable energy potential, and for developing climate change mitigation policies such as REDD+, among others. Wall-to-wall mapping of aboveground biomass (AGB) is now possible with satellite remote sensing (RS). However, RS methods require extant, up-to-date, reliable, representative and comparable in situ data for calibration and validation. Here, we present the Forest Observation System (FOS) initiative, an international cooperation to establish and maintain a global in situ forest biomass database. AGB and canopy height estimates with their associated uncertainties are derived at a 0.25?ha scale from field measurements made in permanent research plots across the world's forests. All plot estimates are geolocated and have a size that allows for direct comparison with many RS measurements. The FOS offers the potential to improve the accuracy of RS-based biomass products while developing new synergies between the RS and ground-based ecosystem research communities.
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