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The full abstract for this thesis is available in the body of the thesis, and will be available when the embargo expires.
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The attached file is a supplement to the author's master's thesis at https://circle.library.ubc.ca/handle/2429/68122
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The full abstract for this thesis is available in the body of the thesis, and will be available when the embargo expires.
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First Nations in British Columbia (BC), Canada, have historically been—and largely continue to be—excluded from colonial governments’ decision-making and management frameworks for fresh water. However, in light of recent legal and legislative changes, and also changes in water governance and policy, there is growing emphasis in scholarship and among legal, policy and advocacy communities on shifting water governance away from a centralized single authority towards an approach that is watershed-based, collaborative, and involves First Nations as central to decisionmaking processes. Drawing on community-based research, interviews with First Nations natural resource staff and community members, and document review, the paper analyzes the tensions in collaborative water governance, by identifying First Nations’ concerns within the current water governance system and exploring how a move towards collaborative watershed governance may serve to either address, or further entrench, these concerns. This paper concludes with recommendations for collaborative water governance frameworks which are specifically focused on British Columbia, but which have relevance to broader debates over Indigenous water governance.
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The full abstract for this thesis is available in the body of the thesis, and will be available when the embargo expires.
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The full abstract for this thesis is available in the body of the thesis, and will be available when the embargo expires.
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Most residents of Canada’s 300 remote communities do not have access to natural gas and must rely upon higher cost and/or less convenient heat sources such as electric heat, heating (furnace) oil, propane, and/or cord wood. This research sought to determine the techno-economic feasibility of increasing biomass utilization for space and hot water heating in remote, off-grid communities in Canada and abroad using a two-option case study approach: 1) a district energy system (DES) connected to a centralized heat generation energy centre fuelled by wood chips; and 2) a decentralized heating option with wood pellet boilers in each individual residence and commercial building. The Nuxalk First Nation Bella Coola community was selected as a case study, with GIS, ground surveys, and climate data used to design DES routes and determine heat demand. It was determined that biomass has the potential to reduce heat costs, reduce the cost of electricity subsidization for electrical utilities, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and increase energy independence of remote communities. Although results of the analysis are site-specific, the research methodology and general findings on heat-source economic competitiveness could be utilized to support increased bioheat production in remote, off-grid communities for improved socio-economic and environmental outcomes.
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The full abstract for this thesis is available in the body of the thesis, and will be available when the embargo expires.
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  • Other
The full abstract for this thesis is available in the body of the thesis, and will be available when the embargo expires.
Data Types:
  • Other
The full abstract for this thesis is available in the body of the thesis, and will be available when the embargo expires.
Data Types:
  • Other