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The Canadian University Survey Consortium found that 56% of students in tertiary education have experienced some form of experiential learning (EL). Scholars engaged with EL argue that Reflective Practice is necessary to provide the transformative learning experience that distinguishes EL from traditional lectures. Our session will explore student perceptions of the merits of reflection before and after an intervention. This research took place in an advanced internship visual studies course at our university. In order to ensure that students value reflective practice, our intervention was embedded into the fabric of the course so that it could provide a “real world” experience for students. We developed and delivered a lesson/workshop on the merits of deep reflection (Brookfield, 1995; Harvey, Coulson, & McMaugh, 2016; and Smith, 2011) and how this practice is necessary to encourage deeper learning (Ghaye, 2011). Our discussion will focus on providing a methodology for how to encourage deep reflection through the use of a course embedded workshop that provides students with a set of tools to facilitate their engagement with deep reflection. We will also outline how linking the reflective exercises to discipline specific concepts/activities will not only encourage deeper reflection but will allow for the transformative experience that is sought in an experiential learning curriculum (Ghaye, 2011). Brookfield, S. D. (1995). Becoming a critically reflective teacher. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Ghaye, T. (2011). Teaching and learning through reflective practice: a practical guide for positive action (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge. Harvey, M., Coulson, D., & McMaugh, A. (2016). Towards a theory of the Ecology of Reflection: Reflective practice for experiential learning in higher education. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice. 13(2): http://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol13/iss2/2 Smith, E. (2011). Teaching critical reflection. Teaching in Higher Education 16(2) pgs.211-223.
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The fossil fuel industry has propelled Alberta’s economy for decades, however periods of prosperity are often followed by low oil prices. With the world striving for low carbon energy solutions, tradespeople must equip themselves with skills to adapt to evolving socio-economic and environmental conditions. Iron & Earth is an NGO committed to empowering fossil fuel workers and Indigenous people to diversify Canada’s energy mix through retraining workshops. This research investigates optimal locations to deliver solar installation workshops by utilizing a weighting matrix using 4 parameters: proximity to utility solar projects, transitioning coal communities, Indigenous populations, and absent training opportunities. Additionally, Alberta’s capacity for new solar workers is explored and the impact of these workshops is measured. Results suggest that there is no perfect area that completely satisfies all 4 parameters however, many rural counties are identified that would be attractive for Iron & Earth to approach to best serve Albertans.
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Community-engaged learning is enhanced when scaffolding is established to deepen student learning and community contribution. Presenters will share examples of scaffolding in course-based community-engaged learning at the University of Victoria and spark dialogue around the challenges and opportunities of scaffolding for transformational learning in community-engaged learning.
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Abstract booklet from the Department of Psychiatry's 32nd Annual Sebastian K. Littmann Research Day
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Proceedings of the 50th Annual Chacmool Archaeology Conference
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Drawing upon Jacques Derrida’s recently published two-volume seminar on the death penalty, this essay analyzes two parallel cases from Mary Shelley’s fictions: on the one hand, Elizabeth’s objection to the death penalty in Frankenstein, as she visits Justine Moritz in prison; and on the other hand, the eternal life bestowed upon Winzy in the short story “The Mortal Immortal.” In both cases, the calculations at work necessarily incorporate something incalculable as the punishment becomes “capital.” Shelley objects not just to the cruelty of the death penalty or to the possibility of wrongful conviction, but also to the ways that the law is permitted to draw equivalencies between persons and subject them to a calculation. By thinking of the death penalty and “life penalty” as two sides of the same coin, Shelley effectively deconstructs the logical framework for capital punishment and articulates a complex abolitionist position. Shelley offers, in her fictional interrogation of life sentences and death sentences, a contradictory and bleak set of meditations upon the injustice inherent in human equivalence.
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The Supply Chain Management exercise called the “Beer Game” is based on experiential learning and a team game educational approach (Sterman, 1992). The Beer Game has been adapted in several of our university’s undergraduate courses, however, there were some challenges with its implementation. Specifically, the game date is scheduled based on venue availability (a room with capacity of 400 seats on or off campus). Previously, up to 25% of students would have time conflicts with other university courses, illness, a failed commute to campus, or sporting extracurricular activities. These students would miss the game and lose out on this learning opportunity. To provide fair and flexible learning opportunities for students, the author pioneered an on-line Beer Game. Although learning benefits of face-to-face board games are widely reviewed in literature (Treher, 2011), on-line options can be successful and allow for more student access to the learning activity (Li, 2000, Chen et al., 1999). Extended search of industry providers identified a vendor for an on-line simulation version of the game: Responsive. The first round of the on-line game was successfully completed in the Fall 2018 semester and is planned to be extended to Winter 2019 for undergraduate and graduate courses. The author achieved IRISS approval for a student survey with Big Question: how student’s Performance (effectiveness of learning), Engagement (participation and team interaction), and Satisfaction (appreciation of the course subject) vary between a group of students who completed the game face-to-face and students who played on-line. Survey results will be presented. Sterman, J. D. (1992). Teaching Takes Off: Flight Simulators for Management Education. OR/MS Today, 40-44. http://web.mit.edu/jsterman/www/SDG/beergame.html Treher, E. (2011). Learning with Board Games. https://www.thelearningkey.com/pdf/Board_Games_TLKWhitePaper_May16_2011.pdf Li, Y. (2000). Computerized Beer Distribution Game Management Flight Simulators: A Review. https://dspace.mit.edu/bitstream/handle/1721.1/8733/48036027-MIT.pdf;sequence=2 Chen, F., Samroengraja R., (1999). The Stationary BeerGame. https://www0.gsb.columbia.edu/mygsb/faculty/research/pubfiles/4345/stationary%20beer%20game.pdf Responsive (2018, July 25). http://www.responsive.net/
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How do we transform education, spark curiosity, drive innovation and prepare students to thrive in their chosen careers? What does learning look like in a postsecondary institution that emphasizes entrepreneurial, creative and critical thinking? How do we design teaching and scholarship that are informed by and contribute to our local, national and international communities? Increasingly, experiential learning is prioritized in higher education. Students demand relevant and meaningful learning experiences and employers expect them to be equipped with the skills required by a changing workforce. This program contains details of the three-day conference and includes biographies of the keynote speakers, session descriptions and presenters.
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Annually, Spatial and Numeric Data Services (SANDS) receives 434 Digital Aerial Survey (DAS) datasets, in AutoCAD format, from the City of Calgary. Each dataset covers an Alberta Township System (ATS) section (Figure 1) and is made up of five layers containing “surface features and topography” information “derived from 1:5000 aerial photos”1. University of Calgary students regularly utilize these files in their research, however, in some cases they are looking for specific features covering an area much larger than an ATS section and in a more geographic information system (GIS) friendly format. To derive city wide products, from the DAS files, required reiterating through numerous geoprocessing operations. These repetitive and time consuming tasks were automated and accomplished within a day, using Python and ArcPy, instead of weeks if executed manually. The next section details the steps that were taken to create the outputs.
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