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  • At our institution, the authors have engaged in open practices and have sought to promote a culture of openness. In this chapter, we discuss factors that we have identified as fostering a culture of openness at school, faculty, and university levels, and we investigate the tensions and challenges experienced in developing a culture of openness. We approach openness as a dynamic and negotiated space which encompasses “collaborative practices [including]… the creation, use and reuse of OER, as well as pedagogical practices employing participatory technologies and social networks for interaction, peer-learning, knowledge creation and empowerment of learners” (Cronin, 2017, ¶ 10). Though openness is often assumed to be a democratizing approach to education, scholars have noted that its practice appears to be complicated and unequal (Gourlay, 2015; Veletsianos & Kimmons, 2012). This chapter contributes to the conversation about what openness looks like in practice. We believe that openness in practice is much more complex than advocates note, and we anticipate that by sharing our experiences, other practitioners who are exploring open practices at their own institutions will benefit. This chapter is divided into four sections: context, factors contributing to a culture of openness, tensions and challenges encountered in enacting openness, and the conclusion.
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  • Post-print,Trending in modern interior design frameworks is an integration of real and simulated (i.e. photographs, murals) elements of nature into buildings, and a number of interdisciplinary studies concern the effects of nature on various aspects of human functioning. The purpose of this paper is to measure employees’ self-reported levels of affective organizational commitment (AOC), perceived productivity, well-being, attention restoration and satisfaction at work to explore how each mural is conceptualized and to make recommendations to hospital administrators and facilities managers as they make decisions concerning mural design and placement. One hospital had a biophilic mural and the other had a bold abstract mural.,
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  • Site investigations were performed at two locations on the Royal Roads/Hatley Park property and the Esquimalt Lagoon to determine metals concentrations. Soil and sediment samples were analyzed for heavy metals concentrations at these two locations in which previous testing found various heavy metals concentrations that exceeded Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) soil and sediment quality guidelines. The soil sampling program found four soil samples with lead and zinc concentrations exceeding both the British Columbia Contaminated Sites Regulation (BC CSR) and CCME guidelines. Four of five strata at the Esquimalt Lagoon had metals concentrations exceeding the more stringent CCME sediment quality guidelines and no samples exceeded BC CSR standards for sediments. It is recommended that this research be used to better delineate heavy metals at the two sites and provide a basis for further site investigations and further study the ecological impacts of heavy metals on the sensitive ecosystems in the Royal Roads/Hatley Park property.
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  • Southern resident killer whale survival is threatened by a variety of known risk factors, but more likely exist. As this population lives entirely within the coastal Pacific waters of North America, the ocean environment may play a role in their survival. Killer whale life history population dynamics, reproductive success and neonate survival were evaluated for links to five physical oceanographic parameters: salinity, sea surface temperature, air pressure, wave height and wave period. This phenological study was conducted within the Canadian waters of the Salish Sea in the federally identified critical habitat. The timings of physical changes were analysed annually and seasonally over temporal periods of positive and negative population trajectories. Significant relationships were found in all cases, most notably with ocean salinity and air pressure. These findings shed light on the biophysical phenological relationships in killer whale survival and should be incorporated into future recovery actions.
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  • Successful organizational change hinges on active engagement and endorsement by the change recipients. This research evaluated the change readiness of laboratory leaders from each of British Columbia’s public health authority laboratory organizations as they entered a period of significant change affecting laboratory service delivery. Using an action research engagement methodology, individual interviews were conducted to determine the cognitive and affective change readiness attributes of these leaders, followed by a focus group session to collectively develop strategies to assist them in becoming ready for change. The findings suggest trust is the underlying factor when building the relationships necessary for organizations to undergo transformational organization change. Healthcare organizations need to think and act differently to be successful in times of rapidly changing environments and organizational uncertainty. Building readiness for change into the culture and character of the organization will enable it to respond nimbly to both planned and emergent change.
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  • The Yukon territory is home to fourteen First Nations, eleven of them self-governing. Close to 25% percent of the Yukon’s population is Indigenous. In the 5 high schools of the Yukon’s capital city of Whitehorse however, interactions and relationships between the indigenous and non-indigenous students are often perceived as minimal and uneasy, as observed by parents, staff, and the students themselves, with social groups often divided between indigenous and non-indigenous youth. Using a non-traditional narrative approach focusing on the lived experiences of students, parents and staff, this paper seeks to examine and identify possible barriers to relationships between indigenous and non-indigenous youth in the schools, while collecting from project participants recommendations to better foster relationship building and connection between students, in support of a more welcoming, inclusive and culturally relevant high school community for Indigenous youth.
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  • A newly presented McKendrick–Von Foerster model with a stochastically perturbed mortality rate is examined. A transformation method converting the model with nonlocal boundary conditions into a system of stochastic functional differential equations is offered. The method could be viewed as analogous to the one which is widely used for such type of deterministic problems. The derived stochastic functional differential equations yield multiple classic population models with ‘naturally born’ stochasticity, including delayed Nicholson’s blowflies, general recruitment and models with cannibalism, which by itself could be objects of future analysis and applications.
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  • This thesis used an action research process to formulate actionable strategies that Clinical Knowledge and Content Management (CKCM) leaders could use to support their nonclinical staff through change. This study explored the following main inquiry question: How can Clinical Knowledge and Content Management staff in Alberta Health Services be effectively supported as they work toward the implementation of new roles and responsibilities? A sequential mixed-methods approach was applied using semistructured interviews, a survey, and a group interview. The three main themes emerged from the data: workplace flexibility, decision-making inclusion, and meetings with management. The project recommendations focus on distinguishing what flexibility means to CKCM staff and creating more opportunity for it in the workplace, adopting a catchball process to incorporate CKCM staff in workplace decisions and creating a structured schedule for staff to meet with management. This study adhered to the Royal Roads University (2019) Research Ethics Policy.
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  • With the primary emphasis in addiction research being problem-focused, centered around the pathophysiology and psychobehavioural aspects of active addiction, there is much to learn and many inspiring discoveries to be made to further comprehend the factors and forces which influence one’s pathway toward and through recovery. Recovery capital represents a novel approach to asset-based inquiry with promise to become a currency useful in the psychometric measurement of the intrinsic and extrinsic resources an individual can draw upon to initiate and maintain a managed state of recovery. This paper summarizes a two-part research agenda aimed at understanding how the acquisition of recovery capital during and following residential substance use disorder treatment influences one’s ability to reduce or abstain from alcohol and other drugs over time.
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  • This case study portrays a real situation and account of staff training designed to improve staff morale and bridge their intercultural understanding of international visitors, encountered during a 2-month fieldwork at Latitude 10 Exclusive Beach Resort, Costa Rica, in the fall of 2011. The training approach employed by Cayuga Sustainable Hospitality described in this case takes the reader through steps designed to reach common understanding, first among the employees and management of Latitude 10, and then between staff and visitors. Andrea Bonilla who is the co-owner and VP Operations of Cayuga Sustainable Hospitality, visits Latitude 10 with the mission to improve quality of service and staff morale. She facilitates several hands-on experiential workshops and staff team-building exercises over several days of her visit. The emphasis of each exercise is on understanding each person on the team, improving team communication, and understanding the perspective of visitors. Throughout this process, it becomes very clear that management needs to focus on strengthening the team, and only then the collective can reach the goal of exceptional service. Within the mission of strengthening the team lies complex socio-cultural dynamics between local and city employees, those between staff and management, and finally between the staff and international visitors. In addition to the cultural clash of tourist expectations and performance by local staff, the case also connects other intertwined issues of poor employment opportunities in the remote beach destination of Santa Teresa, the question of social and economic sustainability that the management must face, and the continuous relationship-building between tourists and local staff to facilitate meaningful and enriching travel experience.
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