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  • Systematic Review Data Set
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  • This dataset is the dataset of the results used for figures and table in the paper Lincke, D., Wolff, C., Hinkel, J., Vafeidis, A.T., Blickensdörfer, L., Povh Skugor, D. (2020). The effectiveness of setback zones for adapting to sea-level rise in Croatia. Regional Environmental Change 20(46). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10113-020-01628-3 It consists from four files: admin_output.csv - A spreadsheet with the results of all runs on municipality level. country_output.csv - A spreadsheet with the results of all runs on national level. croatia_cls_input.csv - A spreadsheet with the input data to the coastal segments. croatia_segemnts.zip - A zipped shapefile with the 1560 croatian coastline segments used in the study. Readme.txt - the documentation. Please see the Readme.txt for more information.
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
    • Text
    • File Set
  • Experimental data related to the paper: "Experimental investigations on the load-carrying capacity of digitally produced wood-wood connections". It presents shear and compression test results for the load-carrying capacity of digitally produced traditional wood-wood assembly named through tenon.
    Data Types:
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  • This dataset is uploaded as supplementary material for article "A new PARAFAC-based algorithm for HPLC-MS data treatment: Herbal extracts identification"
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
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  • Data result from careful measurements with hot wires in an aerodynamic channel and from flow visualization in a hydraulic channel to study the wake behavior after pairs of finite cylinders with 25 mm diameter and pitch-to-diameter ratio p/d = 1.26, at several angular positions to the flow, 0o (side-by-side), 2.5o, 5o, 15o, 25o, 35o, 45o, 75o and 90o (tandem). The aerodynamic channel was made of acrylic, with a cross section of 0.147 m x 0.193 m. The flow velocity was 10 m/s, turbulence intensity of about 1%, Reynolds number 1.66x104. The two circular cylinders were made of PVC with a diameter of 25.1 mm, and a blockage ratio of 13% - 26%, depending on the angular position of the cylinders. Wake flow velocity was measured with a DANTEC StreamLine CTA system with two DANTEC 55P11 probes. Data acquisition was performed by a USB 16-bit NI USB-9162 A/D board, sampling frequency 1000 Hz, low pass filter 300 Hz, 131,072 samples, time series 131.072 s long. The cylinders and the probes were numbered as 1 and 2. Cylinder number one is on the left side of the flow stream. At positions different of 0o, cylinder number 2 faced the flow firstly. Flow visualizations were made in a closed-circuit hydraulic channel with the same dimensions as the aerodynamic channel. The Reynolds number was 1.97x10³ (kinematic viscosity of the water at 15 ºC was 1.14 x 106 m²/s), turbulence intensity about 4%. Two ink tanks provided dye, injected by gravity in the flow through 3 mm diameter flexible PVC tubes inside the cylinders. Video resolution was 1080 x 720 pixels at 30 FPS. Each movie was 25 minutes long. A mirror at 45° with the camera allowed simultaneous top and side view. From top view images, a time series of the angle formed between the tangent to the cylinder wall and the deflected flow from the gap between the cylinders was generated with Tracker and Matlab software. Angles were measured at each 200 frames (6.67 s), sampling frequency of 0.15 Hz. Data are in .txt format to be read by almost all software. Excerpts from the movies from the flow visualizations are in .mkv format. Velocity series files: Velocity signals from the hot wire anemometers (m/s) – Time (s); velocity Probe 1; velocity Probe 2 06 Vel 0 deg.txt: Side-by-side cylinders 0o. 11 Vel 2.5 deg.txt: 2.5o. 12 Vel 5 deg.txt: 5o. 13a Vel 15 deg.txt: 15o. 13b Vel 25 deg.txt: 25o. 13c Vel 35 deg.txt: 35o. 15a Vel 45 deg.txt: 45o. 15b Vel 60 deg.txt: 60o. 15c Vel 75 deg.txt: 75o. 15d Vel 90 deg.txt: Tandem 90o. Angular deflection file: 16 Flow deflection angle.txt: Deflection angles from flow visualizations respectively for 0° (side-by-side cylinders), 2.5°, 5°, 15°, 25°, 35°, 45°, 60°, 75° and 90° (tandem). Flow visualization files: Top and side view of flow visualization. Cylinder position is inverted on top view by a mirror. 0deg.mkv: 0° (side-by-side). 2.5deg.mkv: 2.5o. 5deg.mkv: 5o. 15deg.mkv 15o. 25deg.mkv: 25o. 35deg.mkv: 35o. 45deg.mkv: 45o. 60deg.mkv: 60o. 75deg.mkv: 75o. 90deg.mkv: 90o (tandem).
    Data Types:
    • Video
    • Dataset
    • Text
  • Data result from careful measurements with hot wires in an aerodynamic channel and from flow visualization in a hydraulic to study the bistability phenomenon after pairs of finite cylinders with 25 and 32 mm diameter and aspect ratios of 3 and 4. Measurements were performed in the wake of single and side-by-side finite cylinders, with a sampling frequency of 1000 Hz and a low pass filter at 300 Hz. Each data series has 2^15 elements, corresponding to a time of 32.768 s. Data obtained from digital movies of the flow visualization experiments, used to determine the influence of the flow from the top of the cylinder on the bistable phenomenon, are 159.959 s long, with 160 elements (0.999Hz sampling frequency). Hot wire data are in form of velocity series, movie data in form of distance series. Pitch-to-diameter ratio for side-by-side cylinders was p/d = 1.26. The aerodynamic channel was made of acrylic, with a cross section of 0.147 m x 0.193 m. The flow velocity could be varied from 0 to 15 m/s, with a turbulence intensity of about 1%. The reference velocity, measured with a Pitot tube, and the cylinder diameter, defined the Reynolds number from Red = 2.0×10^4 to Re = 2.5×10^4. DANTEC StreamLine hot wire anemometer with two single hot wire was used. Data acquisition was made with a 16-bit A/D-board (NI 9215-A) with a USB interface using DANTEC StreamWare 3.4 software. Flow visualizations were made in a closed-circuit hydraulic channel with the same dimensions as the aerodynamic channel, with a flow rate from 1.66×10^-6 to 1.93×10^-3 m³/s, velocities of up to 0.068 m/s and turbulence intensity of 4%. The Reynolds number was 2.0×10^3. Data are in .txt format to be read by almost all software. 04-Velocity – non simultaneous 25-3D-25-4D-32-3D-32-4D.txt: Velocity series m/s x time s for : a) 25 mm h/d =3 (253D). b) 25 mm h/d=4 (254D). c) 32 mm h/d =3 (323D). d) 32 mm h/d=4 (324D). 05-Velocity –25-4D-Re25e4.txt: Velocity series m/s x time s for finite cylinder with 25 mm diameter, h/d =4 and Re = 2.5 x 104 Probe 1 – V1. 07-Velocity –25-3D-Re25e4.txt: Velocity series m/s x time s for finite cylinders with 25 mm diameter, h/d=3 and Re = 2.5 x 104 Probe 1 – V1. 10-Distance 25-4D 25-3D.txt: Distance mm x time s for 25 mm diameter cylinders with h/d = 4 (B254D) and 3 (B253D). 11-Velocity –32-4D-Re20e4-P1.txt: Velocity series m/s x time s for 32 mm diameter cylinders finite cylinders with h/d=4 and Re = 2.5 x 104. Probe 1 – V1. 12-Velocity –32-4D-Re20e4-P2.txt: Velocity series m/s x time s for for finite cylinders with h/d=4 and Re = 2.5 x 104 . Probe 2 – V2. . 14-Velocity –32-4D-Re25e4-P1.txt: Velocity series m/s x time s for finite cylinders with h/d=4 and Re = 2.5 x 104. Probe 1 – V1. 15-Velocity –32-4D-Re25e4-P2.txt: Velocity series m/s x time s for finite cylinders with h/d=4 and Re = 2.5 x 104. Probe 2 – V2. 17-Distance 32-4D 32-3D.txt: Series of distance mm x time s for 32 mm diameter cylinders with h/d = 4 (B324D ) and 3 (B323D).
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  • These data provide an in-sight into the long-term behaviour of tensile sutures; data were obtainedwith an experimental set up (described by Pascoletti&al in JMBBM 2020, In Press) which allowed to precisely control the tensile load applied on the suture. The suture underwent 3000 cycles between 30N and 50N; finally its residual strength was measured by means of a tensile test.
    Data Types:
    • Dataset
    • Text
  • Raman spectroscopy can effectively analyze submicron- to microsized microplastics, but Raman spectra of weathered microplastics vary and are often affected by fluorescence. A Raman database of weathered microplastics (RDWP) is necessary for accurately identifying microplastics in various environments. We used Raman spectra of weathered microplastics from sediments around waste plastics processing and recycling industries in Laizhou City, Shandong Province, to build the RDWP.  This dataset contains 20 Raman spectra of standard samples and 155 Raman spectra of weathered microplastics. 135 Raman spectra of weathered microplastics can be identified. Among these 135 Raman Spectra, we selected 124 spectra with distinct peaks to build the Raman database of weathered microplastics (RDWP). The KnowItAll Informatics System 2018 (Bio-Rad Laboratories) was used to analyze the Raman spectra. The software can perform spectral searches, spectral identification, functional group analysis, etc., and has spectral data management, allowing users to build spectral databases by themselves. First, the spectra of the standards are built as a Raman Database of Standard Microplastics (RDSP) separately in KnowItAll. Then, the RDSP is used as one of the searched databases, and the spectra of weathered microplastics are matched and identified. Finally, the spectra of weathered microplastics are built as the Raman database of weathered microplastics (RDWP).
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  • These files include the representative creep data of experimentally investigated alloy VF80 which is a single crystalline (SX) γ′-strengthened Co-base superalloy. The creep test was performed in compression at 950 C and at a constant stress of 400 MPa. The representative data have been selected with different methods. Each file includes three columns: time, plastic strain and strain rate. manual.txt: The result of the manual selection of representative data by the practitioner mean.txt, sbs.txt, and var.txt: The results of the automated selection of representative data by statistical methods
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  • SUMMARY Mimicry is ubiquitous in nature, yet understanding its origin and evolution is complicated by the scarcity of exceptional fossils that enable behavioural inferences about extinct animals. Here we report bizarre true bugs (Hemiptera) that closely resemble beetles (Coleoptera) from mid-Cretaceous amber. The unusual fossil bugs are described as Bersta vampirica gen. et sp. nov. and B. coleopteromorpha gen. et sp. nov., and are placed into a new family, Berstidae fam. nov. The specialised mouthparts of berstids indicate that they were predaceous on small arthropods and their striking beetle-like appearance implies that they mimicked beetles to attack unsuspecting prey; this unique association is not seen among extant insects and represents the first case of aggressive mimicry in the invertebrate fossil record. This rare example of fossilised behaviour enriches our understanding of the palaeoecological associations and extinct behavioural strategies of Mesozoic insects.
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