Filter Results
503026 results
This article discusses the main stages of the historical formation and development of religious media in Russia, as well as their modern existence. In this work, we clarify some specific features of religious periodicals in comparison with the secular print press in Russia. The fact that the church has its own media makes it more independent and independent in expressing its point of view regarding various social and political problems in modern society. It also allows the church to pursue its own policy in the most important sphere of national and religious relations, in relation to certain groups of the country's population. The discourse of the Russian Orthodox Church in the domestic media originated in the XIXth century. The current topical discourse of the Russian Orthodox Church in contemporary print and electronic Russian media is extremely important for the mentality of Russian citizens and society as a whole. This paper considers the system of Russian Orthodox media, which is part of the Russian media system.
Data Types:
  • Document
A poster promoting the IPBES Data Management Policy presented at the World Biodivereiry Forum 2020 in Davos, Switzerland. The Multidisciplinary Expert Panel and the Bureau of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), at their 13th meeting in January 2020, has approved the IPBES data management policy. This is an important step for IPBES to further improve the accessibility of its products and the transparency of the underlying procedures. The IPBES data management policy is based on the principles of Open Science and FAIR data. It provides a framework to make the products (e.g. statements, maps, and tables) traceable from the original data layers, through the processing steps, and up to the final status in the product. The IPBES data management policy also provides guidelines on long-term repositories, metadata, and file formats. Management, handling, and delivery of the materials from the indigenous people and local communities are also covered by the policy. The IPBES data management policy will pave the road towards reproducible assessments over time and scalable at the national or regional scale. In this contribution, we aim to inform the community with the highlights of the policy and to present an outlook of projects emerging from the implementation of the policy. Here is the link to the IPBES data management policy: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3551078
Data Types:
  • Document
A poster promoting the IPBES Data Management Policy presented at the World Biodivereiry Forum 2020 in Davos, Switzerland. The Multidisciplinary Expert Panel and the Bureau of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), at their 13th meeting in January 2020, has approved the IPBES data management policy. This is an important step for IPBES to further improve the accessibility of its products and the transparency of the underlying procedures. The IPBES data management policy is based on the principles of Open Science and FAIR data. It provides a framework to make the products (e.g. statements, maps, and tables) traceable from the original data layers, through the processing steps, and up to the final status in the product. The IPBES data management policy also provides guidelines on long-term repositories, metadata, and file formats. Management, handling, and delivery of the materials from the indigenous people and local communities are also covered by the policy. The IPBES data management policy will pave the road towards reproducible assessments over time and scalable at the national or regional scale. In this contribution, we aim to inform the community with the highlights of the policy and to present an outlook of projects emerging from the implementation of the policy. Here is the link to the IPBES data management policy: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3551078
Data Types:
  • Document
A poster promoting the IPBES Data Management Policy presented at the World Biodivereiry Forum 2020 in Davos, Switzerland. The Multidisciplinary Expert Panel and the Bureau of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), at their 13th meeting in January 2020, has approved the IPBES data management policy. This is an important step for IPBES to further improve the accessibility of its products and the transparency of the underlying procedures. The IPBES data management policy is based on the principles of Open Science and FAIR data. It provides a framework to make the products (e.g. statements, maps, and tables) traceable from the original data layers, through the processing steps, and up to the final status in the product. The IPBES data management policy also provides guidelines on long-term repositories, metadata, and file formats. Management, handling, and delivery of the materials from the indigenous people and local communities are also covered by the policy. The IPBES data management policy will pave the road towards reproducible assessments over time and scalable at the national or regional scale. In this contribution, we aim to inform the community with the highlights of the policy and to present an outlook of projects emerging from the implementation of the policy. Here is the link to the IPBES data management policy: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3551078
Data Types:
  • Document
A poster promoting the IPBES Data Management Policy presented at the World Biodivereiry Forum 2020 in Davos, Switzerland. The Multidisciplinary Expert Panel and the Bureau of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), at their 13th meeting in January 2020, has approved the IPBES data management policy. This is an important step for IPBES to further improve the accessibility of its products and the transparency of the underlying procedures. The IPBES data management policy is based on the principles of Open Science and FAIR data. It provides a framework to make the products (e.g. statements, maps, and tables) traceable from the original data layers, through the processing steps, and up to the final status in the product. The IPBES data management policy also provides guidelines on long-term repositories, metadata, and file formats. Management, handling, and delivery of the materials from the indigenous people and local communities are also covered by the policy. The IPBES data management policy will pave the road towards reproducible assessments over time and scalable at the national or regional scale. In this contribution, we aim to inform the community with the highlights of the policy and to present an outlook of projects emerging from the implementation of the policy. Here is the link to the IPBES data management policy: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3551078
Data Types:
  • Document
To adress questions about the future of biodiversity, it is essential to use a wide range of data from different sources. This is only possible, if the relevant datasets can be found, accessed, and understood through the metadata accompanying them. To promote this essential open data culture, the FAIR data principle was launched (https://www.force11.org/group/fairgroup/fairprinciples), which is gaining traktion throughout the scientific community. With this increasing need and use for FAIR data, metadata, and it's quality, plays an ever increasing role. Nevertheless, providing metadata is not easily accomplished. One of the reasons for this is the cumbersome way of entering metadata in formats or webforms needed by repositories. Also, there is little or no quality control. Finally, the metadata schemes used by the repositories are either restricted to bibliometric metadata (e.g. DataCite) or are using metadata schemes which have to cover a vast diversity of different data (e.g. EML or Darwin Core). I will present an approach which uses domain specific metadata schemes to overcome these problems, by developing these schemes together with scientists of their domain. It can be employed without detailed technical knowledge, e.g. using spreadsheets and a web browser. This will help researchers recognise the value of metadata for their own research and sharing. The provided validation tool increases quality of metadata.
Data Types:
  • Document
This is the collection of codes and annotated matrix described in the paper “A cell atlas of human thymic development defines T cell repertoire formation” This repository contains: 'scjp' package to assist single-cell data analysis jupyter notebooks which show the process of analysis for all figures annotated matrix in h5ad format csv files containing the metadata sample_metadata.xlsx: metadata for all samples generated "thymus_code_package.zip" contains: *.ipynb: jupyter notebooks describing the analysis F00_global_variables.py: contains global variables shared across multiple notebooks scjp: python package to support the single-cell analysis (not for the distribution, there are some dependency issue that needs to be fixed. Final version is under-preparation.) "thymus_annotated_matrix_files.zip" contains: *.csv: metadata including annotation per cell (.obs in scanpy anndata) *.h5ad: anndata containing matrix for normalised read counts, metadata including annotation per cell (use python scanpy package for navigation. See 'Data_navigator.ipynb' for tutorial) Data_navigator.ipynb: jupyter notebook describing each dataset Please also check https://github.com/Teichlab/thymusatlas This github repository will be used to update any additional materials which are not covered in here. Please contact to: jp24@sanger.ac.uk or jepark87@gmail.com for any questions
Data Types:
  • Document
Ogham-Steine sind mit der Ogham-Schrift (vgl. Ferguson 1864, Graves & Limerick 1878) beschriebene Inschriftenträger, die in Irland und im westlichen Teil Britanniens (Wales, Schottland, Cornwall, Devon, Isle of Man) zwischen dem 4. und 9. Jahrhundert aufgestellt wurden. Beschrieben wurden Ogham-Steine mit Namen und verwandtschaftlichen bzw. Stammes-Beziehungen (Macálister 1945), weswegen sich eine Repräsentation als Graph besonders eignet. Beispiele hierfür sind: X MAQI Y → X son of Y (z.B. Q69389090) oder X MAQI MUCOI Y → X son of the tribe Y (z.B. Q69388229). Die sprachwissenschaftliche Analyse der häufig nur beschädigt vorliegenden Steine führt zu unterschiedlichen Lesweisen und Rekonstruktionen (McManus 1997), die sich mit Graphen problemlos nebeneinander stellen und erweitern lassen. Zudem lassen sich Personenbeziehungen und räumliche Topologien wunderbar mit Graphen visualisieren und analysieren, welches z.B. in der historischen Netzwerkforschung getan wird (vgl. Deicke 2017). Das Standardwerk zu Ogham-Inschriften ist der Corpus Inscriptionum Insularum Celticarum (Macálister 1945,1949). Macálister hat darin das weitverbreitete Nummerierungsschema CIIC etabliert. Er beschreibt in seinen Werken zudem zwei unterschiedliche Arten von Worten: formula words und nomenclature words. Beispiele für formula words sind MAQI ᚋᚐᚊᚔ (son, z.B. CIIC 203, Q67978531) oder MUCOI ᚋᚒᚉᚑᚔ (tribe/sept, z.B. CIIC 197, Q69388229). Die Nomenklatur der irischen Personennamen enthüllt Details der frühgälischen Gesellschaft. Beispiele für solche nomenclature words sind CUNA ᚉᚒᚅᚐ (wolf/hound, z.B. CIIC 154, Q68002826) oder CATTU ᚉᚐᚈᚈᚒ (battle, z.B. CIIC 58, Q70892430). Andere Namen weisen auf eventuell göttliche Vorfahren hin. So kommt der Gott Lugh (LUC ᚂᚒᚌ) in vielen Namen wie LUGADDON ᚂᚒᚌᚌᚐᚇᚑᚅ (vgl. CIIC 4, Q70899515) vor. Linked Open Data (LOD) ist de facto zu einem Standard für die Speicherung von geisteswissenschaftlichen Daten in einer semantisch modellierten Cloud geworden. Es wird allerdings oft davon ausgegangen, dass RDF-Daten nicht vollständig oder nicht referenziert sind. Dies lösen wir mit der Verwendung von Wikidata (Erxleben 2014). Wikidata ermöglicht durch sein Datenmodell (Voß et al., Q16354757) eine Attribuierung, Verlinkung zu anderen Entitäten und die Angabe von Provenienz und Quellen. Diese Daten eignen sich insbesondere für die nicht-hierarchische Darstellung unterschiedlicher Interpretationen der Inschriften, sowie ihre Aufschlüsselung in einzelne Bestandteile. Wikidata-Daten lassen sich mithilfe von SPARQL APIs (Bielefeldt et al. 2018), wie dem SPARQL Unicorn (Trognitz & Thiery 2019, Q71937877), filtern, exportieren und mit unterschiedlichen Programmen weiterverarbeiten. Durch Digitalisierung und Veröffentlichung werden die analogen Kataloge in Wikidata maschinenlesbar. Darauf aufbauende statistische und geostatistische Analysen sollen die bisher deskriptiven Auswertungen der Kataloge Macálister 1945 / 1949 und Forsyth 1997 reproduzierbar machen und den Mehrwert der LOD-Modellierung aufzeigen. Als Teil des Ogi-Ogham Projekts (Q70873595, [1]) werden durch ein QGIS-SPARQL-Plugin thematische Karten erstellt, die räumliche Verteilungen typischer Wörter [2], Namen oder Steinarten geben. Diese werden mit historischen Daten über die Ausbreitung von Stämmen oder dem Vorkommen von Ressourcen verbunden. Die statistische Analyse von Häufigkeiten und Zusammenhängen von Namen, Schreibweisen [3], dem Vorkommen zusätzlicher Elemente werden durch ein eigens entwickeltes R-SPARQL-Paket und Netzwerkanalysen in Gephi/Neo4J umgesetzt. Der Vortrag gibt Einblicke in die Wikidata-Modellierung und zeigt erste statistische und räumliche Analysen der Ogi-Ogham Ogham-Steine [4]. Bibliografie und Links [1] https://github.com/ogi-ogham GitHub Repository des Ogi-Ogham Projekts [2] https://w.wiki/AXv Wikidata-Abfrage zu Formula und Nominclature Words [3] https://w.wiki/AXy Wikidata-Abfrage zu Ogham-Inschriften [4] https://w.wiki/AXr Wikidata-Abfrage der Ogham Steine Bielefeldt, A., Gonsior J. and Krötzsch, M. Practical Linked Data Access via SPARQL: The Case of Wikidata. In Tim Berners-Lee, Sarven Capadisli, Stefan Dietze, Aidan Hogan, Krzysztof Janowicz, Jens Lehmann, eds., Proceedings of the WWW2018 Workshop on Linked Data on the Web (LDOW-18), volume 2073 of CEUR Workshop Proceedings, 2018. CEUR-WS.org Deicke, A. Networks of Conflict: Analyzing the ‘Culture of Controversy’ of Polemical Pamphlets of Intra-Protestant Disputes (1548-1580), Journal of Historical Network Research, 71-105 Pages, 2017. DOI: https://doi.org/10.25517/jhnr.v1i1.8 Erxleben F., Günther M., Krötzsch M., Mendez J. and Vrandečić D. Introducing Wikidata to the Linked Data Web. In: Mika P. et al. (eds) The Semantic Web – ISWC 2014. ISWC 2014. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 8796. Springer, Cham Ferguson, S. "Account of Ogham Inscriptions in the Cave at Rathcroghan, County of Roscommon." Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy (1836-1869) 9 (1864): 160-170. Forsyth, K.S. "The ogham inscriptions of Scotland: An edited corpus." (1997): 2160-2160. Graves, C., and Limerick, C. "The ogham alphabet." Hermathena 2, no. 4 (1876): 443-472. Macalister, R. A. S., Corpus Inscriptionum Insularum Celticarum Vol. I., Dublin: Stationery Office (1945). Macalister, R. A. S., Corpus Inscriptionum Insularum Celticarum' Vol. II., Dublin: Stationery Office (1949). McManus, D., A Guide to Ogam. In: Maynooth Monographs, Maynooth: An Sagart (1997). Trognitz, M. and Thiery, F. “Wikidata: A SPARQL(ing) Unicorn?”, CAA-UK: Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology, National UK Chapter, Bournemouth, 2019. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3471404 Voß, J., Bausch, S., Schmitt, J., Bogner, J., Berkelmann, V., Ludemann, F., Löffel, O., Kitroschat, J., Barthoshevska, M. and Katharina Seljuzki. Normdaten in Wikidata Handbuch. Version 1.0. 2014. http://nbn-resolving.de/urn/resolver.pl?urn:nbn:de:bsz:960-opus4-4381.
Data Types:
  • Document
Ogham-Steine sind mit der Ogham-Schrift (vgl. Ferguson 1864, Graves & Limerick 1878) beschriebene Inschriftenträger, die in Irland und im westlichen Teil Britanniens (Wales, Schottland, Cornwall, Devon, Isle of Man) zwischen dem 4. und 9. Jahrhundert aufgestellt wurden. Beschrieben wurden Ogham-Steine mit Namen und verwandtschaftlichen bzw. Stammes-Beziehungen (Macálister 1945), weswegen sich eine Repräsentation als Graph besonders eignet. Beispiele hierfür sind: X MAQI Y → X son of Y (z.B. Q69389090) oder X MAQI MUCOI Y → X son of the tribe Y (z.B. Q69388229). Die sprachwissenschaftliche Analyse der häufig nur beschädigt vorliegenden Steine führt zu unterschiedlichen Lesweisen und Rekonstruktionen (McManus 1997), die sich mit Graphen problemlos nebeneinander stellen und erweitern lassen. Zudem lassen sich Personenbeziehungen und räumliche Topologien wunderbar mit Graphen visualisieren und analysieren, welches z.B. in der historischen Netzwerkforschung getan wird (vgl. Deicke 2017). Das Standardwerk zu Ogham-Inschriften ist der Corpus Inscriptionum Insularum Celticarum (Macálister 1945,1949). Macálister hat darin das weitverbreitete Nummerierungsschema CIIC etabliert. Er beschreibt in seinen Werken zudem zwei unterschiedliche Arten von Worten: formula words und nomenclature words. Beispiele für formula words sind MAQI ᚋᚐᚊᚔ (son, z.B. CIIC 203, Q67978531) oder MUCOI ᚋᚒᚉᚑᚔ (tribe/sept, z.B. CIIC 197, Q69388229). Die Nomenklatur der irischen Personennamen enthüllt Details der frühgälischen Gesellschaft. Beispiele für solche nomenclature words sind CUNA ᚉᚒᚅᚐ (wolf/hound, z.B. CIIC 154, Q68002826) oder CATTU ᚉᚐᚈᚈᚒ (battle, z.B. CIIC 58, Q70892430). Andere Namen weisen auf eventuell göttliche Vorfahren hin. So kommt der Gott Lugh (LUC ᚂᚒᚌ) in vielen Namen wie LUGADDON ᚂᚒᚌᚌᚐᚇᚑᚅ (vgl. CIIC 4, Q70899515) vor. Linked Open Data (LOD) ist de facto zu einem Standard für die Speicherung von geisteswissenschaftlichen Daten in einer semantisch modellierten Cloud geworden. Es wird allerdings oft davon ausgegangen, dass RDF-Daten nicht vollständig oder nicht referenziert sind. Dies lösen wir mit der Verwendung von Wikidata (Erxleben 2014). Wikidata ermöglicht durch sein Datenmodell (Voß et al., Q16354757) eine Attribuierung, Verlinkung zu anderen Entitäten und die Angabe von Provenienz und Quellen. Diese Daten eignen sich insbesondere für die nicht-hierarchische Darstellung unterschiedlicher Interpretationen der Inschriften, sowie ihre Aufschlüsselung in einzelne Bestandteile. Wikidata-Daten lassen sich mithilfe von SPARQL APIs (Bielefeldt et al. 2018), wie dem SPARQL Unicorn (Trognitz & Thiery 2019, Q71937877), filtern, exportieren und mit unterschiedlichen Programmen weiterverarbeiten. Durch Digitalisierung und Veröffentlichung werden die analogen Kataloge in Wikidata maschinenlesbar. Darauf aufbauende statistische und geostatistische Analysen sollen die bisher deskriptiven Auswertungen der Kataloge Macálister 1945 / 1949 und Forsyth 1997 reproduzierbar machen und den Mehrwert der LOD-Modellierung aufzeigen. Als Teil des Ogi-Ogham Projekts (Q70873595, [1]) werden durch ein QGIS-SPARQL-Plugin thematische Karten erstellt, die räumliche Verteilungen typischer Wörter [2], Namen oder Steinarten geben. Diese werden mit historischen Daten über die Ausbreitung von Stämmen oder dem Vorkommen von Ressourcen verbunden. Die statistische Analyse von Häufigkeiten und Zusammenhängen von Namen, Schreibweisen [3], dem Vorkommen zusätzlicher Elemente werden durch ein eigens entwickeltes R-SPARQL-Paket und Netzwerkanalysen in Gephi/Neo4J umgesetzt. Der Vortrag gibt Einblicke in die Wikidata-Modellierung und zeigt erste statistische und räumliche Analysen der Ogi-Ogham Ogham-Steine [4]. Bibliografie und Links [1] https://github.com/ogi-ogham GitHub Repository des Ogi-Ogham Projekts [2] https://w.wiki/AXv Wikidata-Abfrage zu Formula und Nominclature Words [3] https://w.wiki/AXy Wikidata-Abfrage zu Ogham-Inschriften [4] https://w.wiki/AXr Wikidata-Abfrage der Ogham Steine Bielefeldt, A., Gonsior J. and Krötzsch, M. Practical Linked Data Access via SPARQL: The Case of Wikidata. In Tim Berners-Lee, Sarven Capadisli, Stefan Dietze, Aidan Hogan, Krzysztof Janowicz, Jens Lehmann, eds., Proceedings of the WWW2018 Workshop on Linked Data on the Web (LDOW-18), volume 2073 of CEUR Workshop Proceedings, 2018. CEUR-WS.org Deicke, A. Networks of Conflict: Analyzing the ‘Culture of Controversy’ of Polemical Pamphlets of Intra-Protestant Disputes (1548-1580), Journal of Historical Network Research, 71-105 Pages, 2017. DOI: https://doi.org/10.25517/jhnr.v1i1.8 Erxleben F., Günther M., Krötzsch M., Mendez J. and Vrandečić D. Introducing Wikidata to the Linked Data Web. In: Mika P. et al. (eds) The Semantic Web – ISWC 2014. ISWC 2014. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 8796. Springer, Cham Ferguson, S. "Account of Ogham Inscriptions in the Cave at Rathcroghan, County of Roscommon." Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy (1836-1869) 9 (1864): 160-170. Forsyth, K.S. "The ogham inscriptions of Scotland: An edited corpus." (1997): 2160-2160. Graves, C., and Limerick, C. "The ogham alphabet." Hermathena 2, no. 4 (1876): 443-472. Macalister, R. A. S., Corpus Inscriptionum Insularum Celticarum Vol. I., Dublin: Stationery Office (1945). Macalister, R. A. S., Corpus Inscriptionum Insularum Celticarum' Vol. II., Dublin: Stationery Office (1949). McManus, D., A Guide to Ogam. In: Maynooth Monographs, Maynooth: An Sagart (1997). Trognitz, M. and Thiery, F. “Wikidata: A SPARQL(ing) Unicorn?”, CAA-UK: Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology, National UK Chapter, Bournemouth, 2019. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3471404 Voß, J., Bausch, S., Schmitt, J., Bogner, J., Berkelmann, V., Ludemann, F., Löffel, O., Kitroschat, J., Barthoshevska, M. and Katharina Seljuzki. Normdaten in Wikidata Handbuch. Version 1.0. 2014. http://nbn-resolving.de/urn/resolver.pl?urn:nbn:de:bsz:960-opus4-4381.
Data Types:
  • Document
Tools for interacting with the publicly available California Delta Fish Salvage Database, including continuous deployment of data access, analysis, and presentation.
Data Types:
  • Software/Code