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  • This footage was filmed in March 2018 at Royal Holloway, University of London in Egham, United Kingdom. A group of veteran television videotape engineers was reunited with obsolete editing equipment last used in the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s. The editors’ working practices and memories were recorded using multiple digital video cameras and wireless microphones. This video is part of a series in which veteran videotape editors are reunited with obsolete Betacam editing equipment. ADAPT (2013-8) is a European Research Council project at Royal Holloway University of London. The project studies the history of technologies in television, focussing on their everyday use in production activities. ADAPT examines what technologies were adopted and why; how they worked; and how people worked with them. As well as publishing written accounts, the project carries out 'simulations' that reunite retired equipment with the people who used to use it. Participants in these simulations explain how each machine worked and how different machines worked together as an 'array'; how they adapted the machines; and how they worked together as teams within the overall production process. http://www.adaptTVhistory.org.uk https://doi.org/10.17637/rh.c.3925603.v1
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • This footage was filmed in March 2018 at Royal Holloway, University of London in Egham, United Kingdom. A group of veteran television videotape engineers was reunited with obsolete editing equipment last used in the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s. The editors’ working practices and memories were recorded using multiple digital video cameras and wireless microphones. This video is part of a series which explores how different technologies were using to edit videotape for television broadcast. ADAPT (2013-8) is a European Research Council project at Royal Holloway University of London. The project studies the history of technologies in television, focussing on their everyday use in production activities. ADAPT examines what technologies were adopted and why; how they worked; and how people worked with them. As well as publishing written accounts, the project carries out 'simulations' that reunite retired equipment with the people who used to use it. Participants in these simulations explain how each machine worked and how different machines worked together as an 'array'; how they adapted the machines; and how they worked together as teams within the overall production process. http://www.adaptTVhistory.org.uk https://doi.org/10.17637/rh.c.3925603.v1
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • This video is part of a series that shows how producers, camera operators, and other production staff prepared technical plans in order to execute television outside broadcasts. This footage was filmed in May 2016 on location at Northop Hall hotel near Hawarden in Flintshire, United Kingdom. A team of veteran television outside broadcast camera operators, electricians, riggers, sound engineers, producers and production assistants who worked on BBC outside broadcasts in the 1960s and 1970s recreated various aspects of their work. Their working practices and memories were filmed using fixed miniature cameras and recorded using wireless microphones. The recreations and conversations were free-flowing with occasional questions and interventions from the ADAPT crew. About the projectADAPT (2013-8) is a European Research Council project at Royal Holloway University of London. The project studies the history of technologies in television, focussing on their everyday use in production activities. ADAPT examines what technologies were adopted and why; how they worked; and how people worked with them. As well as publishing written accounts, the project carries out 'simulations' that reunite retired equipment with the people who used to use it. Participants in these simulations explain how each machine worked and how different machines worked together as an 'array'; how they adapted the machines; and how they worked together as teams within the overall production process.
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • This footage was filmed in August 2015 at i-dailies, near Ealing in London, United Kingdom. Laboratory staff demonstrate the various skills and methods used to process exposed negative films. They demonstrate the chemical processes, the practice of working in a dark room, and the work of the negative cutter. This video is part of a series that shows how exposed film footage is processed so that it can be edited for use in television. The footage being processed was originally exposed during the project’s historical reenactment of a 16mm television film crew at work. About the projectADAPT (2013-8) is a European Research Council project at Royal Holloway University of London. The project studies the history of technologies in television, focussing on their everyday use in production activities. ADAPT examines what technologies were adopted and why; how they worked; and how people worked with them. As well as publishing written accounts, the project carries out 'simulations' that reunite retired equipment with the people who used to use it. Participants in these simulations explain how each machine worked and how different machines worked together as an 'array'; how they adapted the machines; and how they worked together as teams within the overall production process. www.adaptTVhistory.org.ukhttps://doi.org/10.17637/rh.c.3925603.v1
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • This footage was filmed in March 2018 at Royal Holloway, University of London in Egham, United Kingdom. A group of veteran television videotape engineers was reunited with obsolete editing equipment last used in the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s. The editors’ working practices and memories were recorded using multiple digital video cameras and wireless microphones. This video is part of a series in which veteran videotape editors are reunited with obsolete Betacam editing equipment. ADAPT (2013-8) is a European Research Council project at Royal Holloway University of London. The project studies the history of technologies in television, focussing on their everyday use in production activities. ADAPT examines what technologies were adopted and why; how they worked; and how people worked with them. As well as publishing written accounts, the project carries out 'simulations' that reunite retired equipment with the people who used to use it. Participants in these simulations explain how each machine worked and how different machines worked together as an 'array'; how they adapted the machines; and how they worked together as teams within the overall production process. http://www.adaptTVhistory.org.uk https://doi.org/10.17637/rh.c.3925603.v1
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • This footage was filmed in March 2018 at Royal Holloway, University of London in Egham, United Kingdom. A group of veteran television videotape engineers was reunited with obsolete editing equipment last used in the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s. The editors’ working practices and memories were recorded using multiple digital video cameras and wireless microphones. This video is part of a series in which videotape and Avid editors discuss the introduction of digital video effects systems which changed the way television looked during the 1980s and 1990s. ADAPT (2013-8) is a European Research Council project at Royal Holloway University of London. The project studies the history of technologies in television, focussing on their everyday use in production activities. ADAPT examines what technologies were adopted and why; how they worked; and how people worked with them. As well as publishing written accounts, the project carries out 'simulations' that reunite retired equipment with the people who used to use it. Participants in these simulations explain how each machine worked and how different machines worked together as an 'array'; how they adapted the machines; and how they worked together as teams within the overall production process. http://www.adaptTVhistory.org.uk https://doi.org/10.17637/rh.c.3925603.v1
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • This footage was filmed in March 2018 at Royal Holloway, University of London in Egham, United Kingdom. A group of veteran television videotape engineers was reunited with obsolete editing equipment last used in the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s. The editors’ working practices and memories were recorded using multiple digital video cameras and wireless microphones. This video is part of a series which explores the work of video tape librarians, who kept track of thousands of video cassettes filled with programming in the days before broadcast television transitioned to tapeless workflow and storage. ADAPT (2013-8) is a European Research Council project at Royal Holloway University of London. The project studies the history of technologies in television, focussing on their everyday use in production activities. ADAPT examines what technologies were adopted and why; how they worked; and how people worked with them. As well as publishing written accounts, the project carries out 'simulations' that reunite retired equipment with the people who used to use it. Participants in these simulations explain how each machine worked and how different machines worked together as an 'array'; how they adapted the machines; and how they worked together as teams within the overall production process. http://www.adaptTVhistory.org.uk https://doi.org/10.17637/rh.c.3925603.v1
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • This footage was filmed in March 2018 at Royal Holloway, University of London in Egham, United Kingdom. A group of veteran television videotape engineers was reunited with obsolete editing equipment last used in the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s. The editors’ working practices and memories were recorded using multiple digital video cameras and wireless microphones. This video is part of a series in which veteran videotape editors are reunited with obsolete Betacam editing equipment. ADAPT (2013-8) is a European Research Council project at Royal Holloway University of London. The project studies the history of technologies in television, focussing on their everyday use in production activities. ADAPT examines what technologies were adopted and why; how they worked; and how people worked with them. As well as publishing written accounts, the project carries out 'simulations' that reunite retired equipment with the people who used to use it. Participants in these simulations explain how each machine worked and how different machines worked together as an 'array'; how they adapted the machines; and how they worked together as teams within the overall production process. http://www.adaptTVhistory.org.uk https://doi.org/10.17637/rh.c.3925603.v1
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • This video is part of a series that shows how sound engineers placed microphones, captured sound, and managed communications with BBC Television Centre during an outside broadcast. This footage was filmed in May 2016 on location at Northop Hall hotel near Hawarden in Flintshire, United Kingdom. A team of veteran television outside broadcast camera operators, electricians, riggers, sound engineers, producers and production assistants who worked on BBC outside broadcasts in the 1960s and 1970s recreated various aspects of their work. Their working practices and memories were filmed using fixed miniature cameras and recorded using wireless microphones. The recreations and conversations were free-flowing with occasional questions and interventions from the ADAPT crew. About the projectADAPT (2013-8) is a European Research Council project at Royal Holloway University of London. The project studies the history of technologies in television, focussing on their everyday use in production activities. ADAPT examines what technologies were adopted and why; how they worked; and how people worked with them. As well as publishing written accounts, the project carries out 'simulations' that reunite retired equipment with the people who used to use it. Participants in these simulations explain how each machine worked and how different machines worked together as an 'array'; how they adapted the machines; and how they worked together as teams within the overall production process.
    Data Types:
    • Video
  • This footage was filmed in March 2018 at Royal Holloway, University of London in Egham, United Kingdom. A group of veteran television videotape engineers was reunited with obsolete editing equipment last used in the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s. The editors’ working practices and memories were recorded using multiple digital video cameras and wireless microphones. This video is part of a series in which videotape and Avid editors discuss the introduction of digital video effects systems which changed the way television looked during the 1980s and 1990s. ADAPT (2013-8) is a European Research Council project at Royal Holloway University of London. The project studies the history of technologies in television, focussing on their everyday use in production activities. ADAPT examines what technologies were adopted and why; how they worked; and how people worked with them. As well as publishing written accounts, the project carries out 'simulations' that reunite retired equipment with the people who used to use it. Participants in these simulations explain how each machine worked and how different machines worked together as an 'array'; how they adapted the machines; and how they worked together as teams within the overall production process. http://www.adaptTVhistory.org.uk https://doi.org/10.17637/rh.c.3925603.v1
    Data Types:
    • Video