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With the primary emphasis in addiction research being problem-focused, centered around the pathophysiology and psychobehavioural aspects of active addiction, there is much to learn and many inspiring discoveries to be made to further comprehend the factors and forces which influence one’s pathway toward and through recovery. Recovery capital represents a novel approach to asset-based inquiry with promise to become a currency useful in the psychometric measurement of the intrinsic and extrinsic resources an individual can draw upon to initiate and maintain a managed state of recovery. This paper summarizes a two-part research agenda aimed at understanding how the acquisition of recovery capital during and following residential substance use disorder treatment influences one’s ability to reduce or abstain from alcohol and other drugs over time.
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This case study portrays a real situation and account of staff training designed to improve staff morale and bridge their intercultural understanding of international visitors, encountered during a 2-month fieldwork at Latitude 10 Exclusive Beach Resort, Costa Rica, in the fall of 2011. The training approach employed by Cayuga Sustainable Hospitality described in this case takes the reader through steps designed to reach common understanding, first among the employees and management of Latitude 10, and then between staff and visitors. Andrea Bonilla who is the co-owner and VP Operations of Cayuga Sustainable Hospitality, visits Latitude 10 with the mission to improve quality of service and staff morale. She facilitates several hands-on experiential workshops and staff team-building exercises over several days of her visit. The emphasis of each exercise is on understanding each person on the team, improving team communication, and understanding the perspective of visitors. Throughout this process, it becomes very clear that management needs to focus on strengthening the team, and only then the collective can reach the goal of exceptional service. Within the mission of strengthening the team lies complex socio-cultural dynamics between local and city employees, those between staff and management, and finally between the staff and international visitors. In addition to the cultural clash of tourist expectations and performance by local staff, the case also connects other intertwined issues of poor employment opportunities in the remote beach destination of Santa Teresa, the question of social and economic sustainability that the management must face, and the continuous relationship-building between tourists and local staff to facilitate meaningful and enriching travel experience.
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This thesis explores the influence of government funding on online course development, specifically the Shared Online Course fund offered to two Ontario colleges. It uses a qualitative case study research approach to examine the impact that it had on administrators, faculty, and staff members who were part of online course development under this fund. The findings of the study identify the degree to which the funding influenced the ability of the institutions to develop internal capacity to develop courses online, notes best practices, identifies what challenges were encountered, and makes recommendations that can be implemented for future programs similar to this one. Keywords: development, instructional design, government funding, online learning.
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This inquiry was framed in Nuu-chah-nulth worldview. This thesis comes after the announcement of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (2015b) Calls to Action and demonstrates a collaboration toward reconciliation between an academic institution and Indigenous community. This research knowledge was gathered in accordance with the Royal Roads University (2011) Research Ethics Policy. This thesis explored the postsecondary experiences of Indigenous students through narrative exchanges to better understand how the academic institute could enhance the overall learning experience for Indigenous students. A wholistic approach of the Indigenous postsecondary student journey was followed with a particular focus on strategies to strengthen the engagement and support that can be offered by the academy. The offered guidance to the academic institute supports positive change initiatives, which considers intellectual, emotional, physical, and spiritual space to enhance the opportunity for Indigenous students to feel supported to bring their whole selves into their academic world.
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As a consequence of climate change, many populations of sockeye salmon in the U. S. Pacific Northwest are now experiencing significantly warmer river conditions during their spawning migration from the ocean to their freshwater spawning grounds compared to the 30 year average. The Columbia River witnessed an extended heat wave in 2015 and low flows pushed water temperatures to 21° C, which ended up killing 90 percent of the adult sockeye salmon returning to spawn in their natal streams in the summer months. Fish passage delays at hydro-electric dams potentially compounded this effect. The purpose of this study was to determine if water temperatures had a delay effect on run-timing and potential returning sockeye salmon population mortality in the Snake River in the Columbia Basin. Run timing and delays in migration patterns were examined over the years 2014-2018 in order to notice any trends in migration patterns. Results indicated that, as water temperatures increased, so did the travel time of returning adult sockeye salmon migrating between Bonneville Dam and Lower Granite Dam. Increased water temperatures were associated with migration delays, increasing them by as much as ten days more than the average in some years. Qualitative observations of fish vigor on migrating fish through fish windows also yielded signs of fungal disease on a small number of sockeye salmon during warmer water temperature outbreaks.
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The United Nation World Tourism Organization (2017) concluded that a well-designed and managed tourism sector could support the host’s sustainability goals. Quality systems similar to Fodor’s star rating system for hotels provide a number of potential benefits as a means of tracking tourism’s sustainability performance (Kozak and Nield, 2004), assuming that they promulgate meaningful best practices. In 2016, Hawaii hosted 8.855 million visitors that spent $15 billion and visitor arrivals are expected to increase to more than 9 million visitors in 2018 (Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, 2018). On an average day, the State has 6.50 visitors for every resident and this ratio is expected to increase with more visitor arrivals (Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, 2018). In order to educate businesses, residents and visitors about protecting the State’s natural and cultural resources, the Hawaii Ecotourism Association (HEA), a 501c3, piloted an Ecotourism Certification Program in 2011 and 14 tour operators were certified statewide. Today, HEA’s Sustainable Tourism Certification Program includes 52 tour operators across the State and HEA working to further a partnership with the Global Sustainable Tourism Council for operator certification. Hawaii is one of two states in the U.S. with a certification program aimed at tour operators and HEA’s recommendations for best practices are on par with leading international programs. This case study summarizes the knowledge contributed by the Cooperative Extension Service that supported this effort, describes the lengthy, on-going process of developing HEA’s Certification program with the assistance of Cooperative Extension and provides lessons learned for other regions interested in a more sustainable tourism sector.
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Template,This Plan is the result of the Major Project of Lindsay Huddlestan, BA (CYC), MCP (Candidate), a student in the Master of Community Planning Program at Vancouver Island University. It is the result of a comprehensive literature review, interviews with industry professionals, and additional education in emergency response, trauma reduction and mental health supports for disaster victims. The template is adaptable to local governments and agencies. Local governments in British Columbia can benefit from this Plan to ensure best practice, rapid service and a reduction of potential psychological harm to communities.,
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Syrian refugees in Egypt are using educational centers to support the preservation of their culture and way of life. This thesis takes an in-depth look at four educational centers and their cultural path through the education system and life in Cairo. Looking at literature on identity, belonging, and refugee education, this thesis uses three ideas - right to culture, freedom to belong, and self-determination - as a theoretical lens which allows the participant’s voices to be a central piece in this research. Twelve interviews with Syrian educators, a focus group with ten female educators, and dozens of other informal interviews and participant observation periods, engaged participants about their opinions on their role and the role of education in Syrian cultural survival. The findings from the thesis led to four recommendations: bridging educational communities, teachers teaching teachers, adoption of a social studies curriculum, and play areas and play time.
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This study examines the relationship between multi-day nature-based outdoor programs, resilience development, and divorced women between the ages of 40 and 60. The overarching purpose of the study was to determine what elements to include in outdoor programs to positively affect resilience development in middle-aged divorced women, and to determine an evaluation basis for such programs. The study is underpinned by Richardson’s (2002) metatheory of resilience, the third wave of which focuses on effective motivation of internal resources to foster resilience development. Six divorced women between the ages of 41 and 58 participated in a weekend outdoor program which took place in the Canadian Rockies in late November 2018, as well as pre and post interactions over several months. The study used narrative inquiry methodology contextualized within action research methodology (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000; Herr & Anderson, 2005; Wicks, Reason, & Bradbury, 2008; Given, 2008). It employed pre-adventure semi-structured interviews, online and telephone conversations, personal observations, in-session journaling exercises, a post-adventure focus group interview, and pre- and post-adventure resilience measurements (Liamputtong, 2011; Wagnild & Young, 1993). Analysis of the individual narrative inquiries identified disruptive factors (program elements), resilience catalysts (opportunities provided by the program for disruption), and areas of resilience development, illustrating a positive relationship between the program elements and resilience development for each participant. Resilience scale measurement results contradicted the narrative results in two of six participants, showing a decrease in resilience post-adventure, illustrating resilience domain specificity (Infurna & Luthar, 2018; Luthar, 2015), and highlighting the need for future studies to examine resilience transference (Neill & Dias, 2001).
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The Ontario charitable sector is in a vulnerable situation, as the current leadership is approaching retirement, resulting in a shortage of upcoming leaders to replace them. Excellent programs are available to train new fundraisers, but not executive directors. This situation has resulted in a gap between well-trained fundraisers, but not well-trained leaders. This research explored how the Ontario charitable sector might build a succession plan of new executive directors from within the sector. Adhering to Royal Roads University ethical requirements, this research included current employees in the sector to rectify the problem. The key findings identified a willingness on the part of employees, senior leaders, and supporting organization to train executive directors and overcome the obstacles. The final recommendations are to develop new executive directors and determine where the system needs to change to ensure the viability of the Ontario charitable sector.
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