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This session will look at the 'problem' of so-called predatory publishers. These firms regularly approach researchers via email to solicit manuscripts and conference papers and with the increased emphasis on publishing as a measure of success it can be easy to give into temptation. This session will look at whether these publishers are a problem, how to spot a potential predatory publisher or conference and the best action to take if you are approached.
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Data management is a vital part of all research projects. Done well it can save time and stress as well as making the research process more efficient. This session will introduce participants to the basic elements of managing the information they use and create as part of their projects including how information can be backed up, stored and shared.
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Public seminar given at the Institute of Criminology on 31st October 2019. Presents the argument given in the 'Societies' journal article of the same name.
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Presentation given at the CILIP Information Literacy Group Event "Exploring the Intersections of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communications". This presentation looks at the range of job roles available to librarians in scholarly communication and the skills they need to work in these roles. It also contains an activity designed to encourage the mapping of known information literacy skills on to existing scholarly communication job advertisements.
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Two alternative exact characterizations of the minimum error probability of Bayesian M-ary hypothesis testing are derived. The first expression corresponds to the error probability of an induced binary hypothesis test and implies the tightness of the meta-converse bound by Polyanskiy et al.; the second expression is a function of an information-spectrum measure and implies the tightness of a generalized Verdú-Han lower bound. The formulas characterize the minimum error probability of several problems in information theory and help to identify the steps where existing converse bounds are loose.
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© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Multifaith buildings have become common in Europe, North America, and much of the world, but they have yet to receive sufficient scholarly attention in the history of religious ideas, or in the theory of material religion. This paper begins to address this lacuna by the consideration of an early, but little known, multifaith chapel donated to Somerville College Oxford in the 1930s, which is unique within Oxford University. Its history, architecture, and artworks give valuable insights into the religious, intellectual, and cultural roots of what would subsequently become a global norm. The chapel can be seen as both a manifestation of the aspirations of liberal Christianity in the interwar years, including the advancement of women and ecumenism, and of the contestation of the role of religion in higher education among elites in the same period. Examining the case of Somerville chapel contributes to the theory of religion by considering how unbelief and multifaith ideas may be attempted to be materially expressed, and how this physical presence subsequently may impact on institutions and people through ongoing contestation, and negotiated use.
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