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  • Abstract: Not Available Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: (Sapporo) * LATITUDE: 43.085833 * LONGITUDE: 141.336389 * DATE/TIME: 2008-10-31T15:30:00 * ELEVATION: 12.0 m * LOCATION: Japan * METHOD/DEVICE: Weather station/meteorological observation
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
  • Abstract: Not Available Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: * LATITUDE: -76.213887 * LONGITUDE: -29.676130 * DATE/TIME: 2018-02-17T14:55:00 * ELEVATION: -380.0 m * LOCATION: Weddell Sea * CAMPAIGN: PS111 * BASIS: Polarstern * METHOD/DEVICE: Bongo net
    Data Types:
    • Other
  • Abstract: Coccolithophores are unicellular marine phytoplankton and important contributors to global carbon cycling. Most work on coccolithophore sensitivity to climate change has been on the small, abundant bloom-forming species Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica. However, large coccolithophore species can be major contributors to coccolithophore community production even in low abundances. Here we fit an analytical equation, accounting for simultaneous changes in CO2 and light intensity, to rates of photosynthesis, calcification and growth in Scyphosphaera apsteinii. Comparison of responses to G. oceanica and E. huxleyi revealed S. apsteinii is a low-light adapted species and, in contrast, becomes more sensitive to changing environmental conditions when exposed to unfavourable CO2 or light. Additionally, all three species decreased their light requirement for optimal growth as CO2 levels increased. Our analysis suggests that this is driven by a drop in maximum rates and, in G. oceanica, increased substrate uptake efficiency. Increasing light intensity resulted in a higher proportion of muroliths (plate-shaped) to lopadoliths (vase shaped) and liths became richer in calcium carbonate as calcification rates increased. Light and CO2 driven changes in response sensitivity and maximum rates are likely to considerably alter coccolithophore community structure and productivity under future climate conditions. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: In order to allow full comparability with other ocean acidification data sets, the R package seacarb (Gattuso et al, 2019) was used to compute a complete and consistent set of carbonate system variables, as described by Nisumaa et al. (2010). In this dataset the original values were archived in addition with the recalculated parameters (see related PI). The date of carbonate chemistry calculation by seacarb is 2020-06-12. Coverage: Not Available
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
  • Abstract: The SOAP voyage examined air-sea interactions over the productive waters of the Chatham Rise, east of New Zealand onboard the RV Tangaroa (New Zealand National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington) from February 12 to March 7 (Law et al., 2017: doi:10.5194/acp-17-13645-2017). 23 seawater samples were collected throughout the voyage for the purpose of generating nascent SSA. Seawater samples were collected from the ocean surface during workboat operations (approximately 10 cm depth) or from the mixed layer (3 - 12 m depth, always less than the measured mixed layer depth) or deep water samples. Surface samples were collected in prewashed 5L PTFE bottles, subsurface measurements were colected in Niskin bottles onboard a CTD rosette. Nascent SSA was generated in-situ in a 0.45 m3 cylindrical polytetrafluoroethylene chamber housing four sintered glass filters with porosities between 16 and 250 μm (Cravigan et al., 2019: https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-797). Dried and filtered compressed air was passed through the glass filters at a flow rate of 15.5 ± 3 L/min and resulting SSA was sampled from the headspace of the chamber. The volatility and hygroscopicity of nascent SSA was determined with a volatility and hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser (VH-TDMA) (Johnson et al., 2004: doi:10.1016/j.jaerosci.2003.10.008, 2008: doi:10.1016/j.jaerosci.2008.05.005). A diffusion drier was used to dry the sample flow to 20 ± 5 % RH prior to characterisation by the VH-TDMA. The VH-TDMA used two TSI 3010 condensation particle counters. The aerosol sample flow rate for each scanning mobility particle sizer was 1 L/min, resulting in a total inlet flow of 2 L/min, the sheath flow for the pre-DMA, V-DMA and H-DMA were 11, 6 and 6 L/min, respectively. The dependence of HGF on RH at ambient temperature was measured for one water sample (workboat 9) to provide the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH). All VH-TDMA data were inverted using the TDMAinv algorithm (Gysel et al., 2009: doi:10.1016/j.jaerosci.2008.07.013). The seawater chlorophyll-a concentration was measured by filtering 2 litres of sample water onto GF/F Whatman filters, with immediate freezing in liquid nitrogen and subsequent analysis within 3 months of collection. Filters were ground and chlorophyll-a extracted in 90 % acetone with concentration determined by a calibrated fluorometer (Perkin-Elmer), with an analytical precision of 0.001 mg/m3 (Law et al., 2011: doi:10.1016/j.dsr2.2010.10.018). Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: * LATITUDE: -44.600000 * LONGITUDE: 174.870000 * DATE/TIME: 2016-03-01T08:03:00 * LOCATION: Chatham Rise * CAMPAIGN: 61TG2012-02-11 * BASIS: Tangaroa * METHOD/DEVICE: PTFE bottle, 5L
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
  • Abstract: Benthic foraminifera oxygen isotopes: The benthic isotope record was generated by the late N.J. Shackleton. Measurements were carried out in the Godwin Laboratory for Palaeoclimate Research (University of Cambridge), using a VG PRISM mass spectrometer. Where possible two or three separate analyses of different benthic species were made in each sample; a correction factor was applied according to the species and the average of all the corrected values at each level is shown in the figures. The following species were analysed, and adjusted as indicated: Cibicidoides sp.: +0.51; Uvigerina peregrina and similar specimens: 0.0; Globobulimina affinis: -0.4; Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi, +0.64; Globocassidulina sp.: -0.1; Hoeglundina elegans: -0.7. These adjustments are optimized for this particular core in accordance with the long-standing convention by which Uvigerina peregrina is assumed to deposit oxygen in isotopic equilibrium. Results are reported with reference to the international standard VPDB and the precision is better than ±0.08‰ for d18O. Age model: The age model was developed by aligning the abrupt transitions of d18O record of G. bulloides in core MD01-2444 to warming and cooling events in the NGRIP d18Oice record, presented on: (i) the GICC05 timescale [Svensson, A. et al. A 60,000 year Greenland stratigraphic ice core chronology. Clim. Past 4, 47–57 (2008)]; and (ii) the WD2014: modified timescale, whereby NGRIP GICC05 ice ages 31.2–67.2 ka are multiplied by 1.0063. [Buizert, C. et al. The WAIS Divide deep ice core WD2014 chronology – Part 1: Methane synchronization (68–31 ka BP) and the gas age–ice age difference. Clim. Past 11, 153-173 (2015)]. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: * LATITUDE: 37.565000 * LONGITUDE: -10.134000 * ELEVATION: -2656.0 m * CAMPAIGN: MD123 * BASIS: Marion Dufresne (1995) * METHOD/DEVICE: Calypso Corer
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
  • Abstract: XRF Analysis: Archive halves of sections from Core MD01-2444 were analysed using an Avaatech XRF core scanner at the University of Cambridge. The core surface was carefully scraped cleaned and covered with a 4-mm thin SPEXCertiPrep Ultralene foil to avoid contamination and minimize desiccation. Each section was measured using a current of 0.2mA at three different voltages: 10 kV, 30 kV using a thin lead filter, and 50 kV using a copper filter. XRF data were collected every 2.5 mm. The length and width of the irradiated surface was 2.5 and 12 mm, respectively, with a count time of 40s. The record was generated by D.A. Hodell and S. Crowhurst. Age model: The age model was developed by aligning the abrupt transitions of d18O record of G. bulloides in core MD01-2444 to warming and cooling events in the NGRIP d18Oice record, presented on: (i) the GICC05 timescale [Svensson, A. et al. A 60,000 year Greenland stratigraphic ice core chronology. Clim. Past 4, 47–57 (2008)]; and (ii) the WD2014: modified timescale, whereby NGRIP GICC05 ice ages 31.2–67.2 ka are multiplied by 1.0063. [Buizert, C. et al. The WAIS Divide deep ice core WD2014 chronology – Part 1: Methane synchronization (68–31 ka BP) and the gas age–ice age difference. Clim. Past 11, 153-173 (2015)]. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: * LATITUDE: 37.565000 * LONGITUDE: -10.134000 * ELEVATION: -2656.0 m * CAMPAIGN: MD123 * BASIS: Marion Dufresne (1995) * METHOD/DEVICE: Calypso Corer
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
  • Abstract: Migrated reflection seismic lines in segy-format Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: * LATITUDE START: 69.678000 * LONGITUDE START: 18.989800 * LATITUDE END: 53.563960 * LONGITUDE END: 8.548130 * DATE/TIME START: 2014-08-05T00:00:00 * DATE/TIME END: 2014-10-08T00:00:00 * CAMPAIGN: PS87 * BASIS: Polarstern * METHOD/DEVICE: Underway cruise track measurements
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
  • Abstract: Not Available Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: * LATITUDE: -77.111926 * LONGITUDE: -33.936862 * DATE/TIME: 2018-02-22T07:25:00 * ELEVATION: -404.0 m * Penetration: 0 * Recovery: 0 * LOCATION: Weddell Sea * CAMPAIGN: PS111 * BASIS: Polarstern * METHOD/DEVICE: Gravity corer
    Data Types:
    • Image
  • Abstract: Not Available Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: EVENT LABEL: (Sapporo) * LATITUDE: 43.082222 * LONGITUDE: 141.341667 * DATE/TIME: 2005-10-31T15:30:00 * ELEVATION: 15.0 m * LOCATION: Japan * METHOD/DEVICE: Weather station/meteorological observation EVENT LABEL: (Sapporo) * LATITUDE: 43.085833 * LONGITUDE: 141.336389 * DATE/TIME: 2008-10-31T15:30:00 * ELEVATION: 12.0 m * LOCATION: Japan * METHOD/DEVICE: Weather station/meteorological observation
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
  • Abstract: We modelled the larval phenology of the invasive crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus along the Atlantic coast of North America and North Europe. The phenology was computed from laboratory data on survival and duration of larval development, temperature and abundance of larvae in the field. Category: geoscientificInformation Source: Not Available Supplemental Information: Not Availble Coverage: Not Available
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Dataset
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