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This study includes no data at this time. Additional data and documentation will be made available at a later date. When these materials are available, users will be able to download the updated versions of the study. The National Study of Learning Mindsets encompasses more than 16,000 ninth grade students across 76 United States public high schools. It was designed to understand which kinds of students, in which kinds of classrooms, and in which kinds of schools were most likely to benefit from an online exercise designed to foster a growth mindset during the transition to high school.
Data Types:
  • Other
Since 2007, the American Psychological Association (APA) has commissioned an annual nationwide survey as part of it's Mind/Body Health campaign to examine the state of stress across the country and understand its impact. The Stress in America survey measures attitudes and perceptions of stress among the general public and identifies leading sources of stress, common behaviors used to manage stress and the impact of stress on our lives. The results of the survey draw attention to the serious physical and emotional implications of stress and the inextricable link between the mind and body. From 2007 to 2018 the research has documented this connection among the general public as well as various sub-segments of the public. Each year, the Stress in America surveys aims to uncover different aspects of the stress/health connection via focusing on a particular topic and/or subgroup of the population. Below is a list of the focus of each of the Stress in America surveys. 2007-2018 Cumulative Dataset 2007 General Population 2008 Gender and Stress 2009 Parent Perceptions of Children's Stress 2010 Health Impact of Stress on Children and Families 2011 Our Health Risk 2012 Missing the Health Care Connection 2013 Are Teens Adopting Adults' Stress Habits 2014 Paying With Our Health 2015 The Impact of Discrimination 2016 Coping with Change, Part 1 2016 Coping with Change, Part 2: Technology and Social Media 2017 The State of Our Nation 2018 Stress and Generation Z
Data Types:
  • Other
Beginning in 2016, the Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS) survey adopted a core and supplement structure. The LEMAS core has been conducted every 3 to 4 years since 1987 with approximately 3,200 local, county and state law enforcement agencies across the United States. Due to the breadth of the survey, detailed analysis of any specific law enforcement topic cannot be done with the LEMAS core. The LEMAS supplements are designed to fill this void by allowing for a more comprehensive examination on a key topic in law enforcement and are administered in between core years. The 2016 LEMAS Body-Worn Camera Supplement (LEMAS-BWCS) is the first supplement administered under the new structure.
Data Types:
  • Other
The annual American Time Use Survey (ATUS) collects information on people in the United States and what activities they spend their time in during a 24 hour period. Questions are not only asked about what activities are engaged in, but also with who is with them at that time, for how long do they spend doing the activity, and where the activity takes place. The current study contains the observed paradata derived from the original Blaise audit trails of the full 2010 ATUS public-use data. The dataset contains data describing the interaction by interviewers with the CATI instrument while entering responses provided by respondents. The file contains 18 variables and 2,061,889 cases.
Data Types:
  • Other
This data collection contains the results of a sample survey of University of Michigan (U-M), Ann Arbor, faculty, staff, and students meant to represent the full diversity of the community and to capture information and perceptions on demographics, climate, institutional commitment and inclusive and equitable treatment, departmental norms, intergroup interactions, and discrimination. With input from committees of students, faculty, and staff, the survey instrument was developed collaboratively by the U-M Office of the Provost, U-M's Survey Research Center, and administered by SoundRocket, an external social science survey research company. The instrument was delivered as a web survey, and several notifications and reminders were used to encourage completion, as well as an incentive. These notifications and reminders were delivered in phases. Variables in the collection describe age, gender and gender identity, race/ethnicity, school/department/unit, religious affiliation, disability status, campus safety, rating of campus climate, intergroup interaction, discriminatory events, composite rating scores, and more.
Data Types:
  • Other
In January 2013, the Urban Institute launched the Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS), a survey of the nonelderly population, to explore the value of cutting-edge, Internet-based survey methods to monitor the Affordable Care Act (ACA) before data from federal government surveys are available. Topics covered by the 15th round of the survey (first quarter 2018) include self-reported health status, health insurance coverage, access to and use of health care, out-of-pocket health care costs, health care affordability, work experience, consumer experiences with health insurance marketplaces, the individual mandate, attitudes toward health plans that are not ACA-compliant, attitudes toward Medicaid work requirements, trust in health care providers, and plan quality ratings. Additional information collected by the survey includes age, gender, sexual orientation, marital status, education, race, Hispanic origin, United States citizenship, housing type, home ownership, internet access, income, employment status, and employer size.
Data Types:
  • Other
In January 2013, the Urban Institute launched the Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS), a survey of the nonelderly population, to explore the value of cutting-edge, Internet-based survey methods to monitor the Affordable Care Act (ACA) before data from federal government surveys are available. Topics covered by the 14th round of the survey (third quarter 2017) include self-reported health status, type of and satisfaction with health insurance coverage, access to and use of health care, out-of-pocket health care costs, health care affordability, health insurance literacy, health plan network, opinions about the ACA and health insurance, surprise medical bills, distance and travel time to usual source of care, and rating of neighborhood characteristics. Additional information collected by the survey includes age, gender, sexual orientation, marital status, education, race, Hispanic origin, United States citizenship, housing type, home ownership, internet access, income, employment status, and employer size.
Data Types:
  • Other
The Forces of Change Survey is an annual survey completed by the state and territorial health agencies that comprise the membership of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO). ASTHO is the national nonprofit organization representing public health agencies in the United States, the U.S. territories and freely associated states, and the District of Columbia, and the over 100,000 public health professionals these agencies employ. The Forces of Change Survey primarily focuses on emergent and rapidly changing trends. The data collected sought to determine the current climate at state and territorial health agencies as it related to budget, workforce, accreditation, and special interest topics. The 2017 Forces of Change Survey examined the following topics: Health agency resources Activities related to the Zika virus Opioid epidemic response Communicating the value of public health Efforts to advance health equity The web-based survey, fielded by ASTHO in May of 2017, was administered to state and territorial health agencies through their senior deputies. A total of 52 health agencies responded (from 46 states, Washington, D.C., and five territories and freely associated states). Data included as part of this collection includes one dataset with 122 variables for 52 cases.
Data Types:
  • Other
These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed. The objective of this project was to use a mixed methods approach to expand the understanding of constructs important to resilience after children's exposure to violence (CEV), expand the range of outcomes examined, develop and refine measures appropriate for youth, and identify protective factors that could be targets for prevention and intervention. Eight focus groups and 24 cognitive interviews were conducted with parents and youth to explore resilience constructs. These were followed by a survey completed by 440 youth ages 10 to 21, recruited from youth-serving organizations. Key variables in this collection include demographics such as age, gender, and education; experience of violence; and physical and psychological well-being. The data collection includes: Survey data file, NCAC.CEVres.survey-data_Updated.sav, n=440, 208 variables Focus group data file, NCAC.CEVres.Focus-group-transcripts.pdf, n=70 Cognitive interview data file, NCAC.CEVres.Cognitive-interview-transcripts_updated.pdf, n=24 The focus group and interview data files are not available at this time, even under restricted use.
Data Types:
  • Other
These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed. This data collection represents an experimental micro-level geospatial crime prevention strategy that attempted to interrupt the near repeat (NR) pattern in residential burglary by creating a NR space-time high risk zone around residential burglaries as they occurred and then using uniformed volunteers to notify residents of their increased risk and provide burglary prevention tips. The research used a randomized controlled trial to test whether high risk zones that received the notification had fewer subsequent burglaries than those that did not. In addition, two surveys were administered to gauge the impact of the program, one of residents of the treatment areas and one of treatment providers. The collection contains 6 Stata datasets: BCo_FinalData_20180118_Archiving.dta(n = 484, 8 variables) Red_FinalData_20180117_Archiving.dta (n = 268, 8 variables) BCo_FinalDatasetOtherCrime_ForArchiving_v2.dta(n = 484, 8 variables) Redlands_FinalDataSecondary_ForArchiving_v2.dta (n = 266, 8 variables) ResidentSurvey_AllResponses_V1.4_ArchiveCleaned.dta (n = 457, 42 variables) VolunteerSurvey_V1.2_ArchiveCleaned.dta (n = 38, 16 variables) The collection also includes 5 sets of geographic information system (GIS) data: BaltimoreCounty_Bnd.zip BC_NR_HRZs.zip BurglaryAreaMinus800_NoApts.zip Redlands_CityBnd.zip RedlandsNR_HRZs.shp.zip
Data Types:
  • Other
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