Filter Results
9013 results
Women are dramatically underrepresented in legislative bodies, and most scholars agree that the greatest limiting factor is the lack of female candidates (supply). However, voters’ subconscious biases (demand) may also play a role, particularly among conservatives. We designed an original field experiment to test whether it is possible to increase women’s electoral success through political party leaders’ efforts to exogenously shock the supply of female candidates and/or voter demand for female representatives. The key experimental treatments involved messages from a state Republican Party chair to the leaders of 1,842 precinct-level caucus meetings. We find that party leaders’ efforts to stoke both supply and demand (and especially both together) increase the number of women elected as delegates to the statewide nominating convention. We then replicate this finding with a national sample of validated Republican primary election voters (N=2,897) using a vignette survey experiment. Our results suggest that simple interventions from party leaders can affect the behavior of candidates and voters and ultimately lead to a substantial increase in women’s electoral success.
Data Types:
  • Software/Code
  • Document
  • Text
This document contains replication material and supplementary analyses for "Citizenship Regimes and the Politicization of Immigrant Groups"
Data Types:
  • Document
Computer code and supporting data files to reproduce figures in the manuscript.
Data Types:
  • Software/Code
  • Tabular Data
  • Document
  • Text
This is the supplementary material (revised version) of DCLN paper published in proceedings of IJCNN 2015. The original source is available at "https://sourceforge.net/projects/dcln/".
Data Types:
  • File Set
In recent years, Americans have become more affectively polarized: that is, ordinary Democrats and Republicans increasingly dislike and distrust members of the opposing party. Such polarization is normatively troubling, as it exacerbates gridlock and dissensus in Washington. Given these negative consequences, I investigate whether it is possible to ameliorate this partisan discord. Building on the Common Ingroup Identity Model from social psychology, I show that by heightening subjects’ sense of American national identity, they come to see members of the opposing party as fellow Americans, rather than rival partisans. As a result, they like the opposing party more, thereby reducing affective polarization. Using several original experiments, as well as a natural experiment surrounding the July 4th holiday and the 2008 Summer Olympics, I find strong support for my argument. I conclude by discussing the implications of these findings for efforts to reduce polarization more generally.
Data Types:
  • Software/Code
  • Tabular Data
  • Document
Review of Economics and Statistics: Forthcoming
Data Types:
  • Software/Code
  • Tabular Data
  • Document
  • Text
Together, the datasets and .do files replicate Tables 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 from "The long and short of it: The unpredictability of late deciding voters." For a description of the variables used in each model, see the paper and .do file.
Data Types:
  • Software/Code
  • Tabular Data
  • Document
Open Source indicators Handbook and validated Ground Truth. Please refer to the Handbook for a description of the Program.
Data Types:
  • Tabular Data
  • Document
This study contains CORONA satellite images that were used to identify sites and landscape features in northeastern Syria and adjacent regions. Most prominently, they are the source for the maps of sites and premodern trackways that appear in Ur, J. A. in press. Urbanism and Cultural Landscapes in Northeastern Syria: The Tell Hamoukar Survey, 1999-2001. Oriental Institute Publications 139. Chicago: University of Chicago Oriental Institute. All images are in Erdas Imagine (.img) format and are in the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) projection (Zone 37 north) using the WGS 1984 datum. For more information on the processing and interpretation of these CORONA scenes, see the above monograph.
Data Types:
  • Software/Code
  • Document
  • File Set
In recent years, Americans have become more affectively polarized: that is, ordinary Democrats and Republicans increasingly dislike and distrust members of the opposing party. Such polarization is normatively troubling, as it exacerbates gridlock and dissensus in Washington. Given these negative consequences, I investigate whether it is possible to ameliorate this partisan discord. Building on the Common Ingroup Identity Model from social psychology, I show that by heightening subjects’ sense of American national identity, they comes to see members of the opposing party as fellow Americans, rather than rival partisans. As a result, they like the opposing party more, thereby reducing affective polarization. Using several original experiments, as well as a natural experiment surrounding the July 4th holiday and the 2008 Summer Olympics, I find strong support for my argument. I conclude by discussing the implications of these findings for efforts to reduce polarization more generally.
Data Types:
  • Software/Code
  • Tabular Data
  • Document
2