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This dataset includes outputs of 5000 simulations of CLM4.5(ED) to quantify the sensitivity of the model outputs to changes in model parameters using the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST). Each simulation is generated by simultaneously sampling from 15% deviations of the default values of >80 vegetation parameters. This dataset includes 1) model codes of CLM4.5(ED) used for the sensitivity analysis; 2) the parameter samples; and 3) the corresponding model outputs of vegetation status (e.g., Gross Primary Production, Leaf Area Index and Biomass) and demography (e.g., diameter growth and mortality rates). The outputs are organized to the format of the FAST toolbox (https://sites.google.com/site/xuchongang/uasatoolbox).
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The IP data set was collected using a time domain-induced polarization (TDIP) method along 65 profiles of various lengths over the floodplain. Surface time domain?induced polarization (TDIP) data was collected to create the 3?D images of the complex electrical resistivity, in terms of magnitude and phase, which are associated with mineral precipitation and other lithological properties. The TDIP data was then used to estimate the spatial distribution of naturally reduced zones, which are known to be biogeochemical hotspots in floodplains having increased uranium and other redox-sensitive metal concentrations as well as high carbon contents. In the TDIP method, the transient decay of voltage is measured after current shut-off, typically in the form of an integral of decay curves over a predefined time window (so-called integral chargeability). TDIP measurements at the site were collected using the Syscal Iris Pro Switch equipment with a square-wave current injection, 50% duty cycle, and a pulse length of 2 s. The integral chargeability measurements were carried out using 20 windows during voltage decay between 240 and 1840 ms after current shut-off. Tomographic measurements were collected by deploying stainless steel electrodes with an electrode separation of 1.8 m and using a dipole-dipole ‘‘skip-2’’ and ‘‘skip-3’’ measuring protocol (i.e., for a dipoles length of 5.4 and 7.2 m, respectively). The sequence of dipole-dipole measurements was carefully arranged to (1) minimize unwanted electromagnetic coupling effects in the data, avoiding potential measurements with electrodes located inside the current dipole, (2) prevent voltage measurements using electrodes, which might be polarized due to previous current injection, and (3) increase the signal-to-noise ratio for an intended exploration depth of 8 m, i.e., the bottom of the aquifer. All measurements were collected as normal and reciprocal pairs for estimation of the data error. The IP measurements were collected with symmetric arrays (i.e., the measuring equipment placed at the center of the electrode array) with a maximum of 36 electrodes, considering that longer profiles revealed a significant increase in the normal-reciprocal misfit for the measurements of the decay curve, probably due to greater impact of electromagnetic coupling on the data. The TDIP data sets were inverted in a twodimensional domain along each transect using CRTomo, which is a smoothness-constraint inversion code based on a finite element algorithm. The resistivity and phase shift values at each pixel were then assigned at the corresponding point within the 3-D floodplain domain (the black rectangle Figure 1b) and used in the 3-D estimation. The TDIP inversion results provided the distribution of the complex resistivity, expressed in terms of its magnitude and phase-shift. The analysis of the normal-reciprocal misfit was used to estimate the relative error. We removed the measurement with smallest voltage difference (<2 mV), representing about 2% variations in the data. For the inversion of TDIP measurements, chargeability values were linearly converted to frequency domain phase values (at the fundamental frequency of 0.125 Hz), by assuming a constant-phase response. This approach has been demonstrated to provide consistent results in previous studies
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This data package is a compilation of studies and raw datasets on root traits including root biomass, root nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations organized by different root diameters, species, soil depth, and forest types in Puerto Rico. The attached zip file contains a Word document that describes metadata including the methods, the data sources and publications used in the synthesis, and information about the content of included CSV data files. Separate KMZ and csv files are attached with the collection locations.
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Measurements of leaf full-spectrum (i.e. 350-2500 nm) reflectance and transmittance across 54 tropical tree species. Data includes leaves collected from fully sunlit and shaded canopy strata as well as leaves for you, mature, old and senescent leaf ages. Data for each sample includes the relative age estimate, leaf canopy position, and sample number. This data was collected as part of the 2017 NGEE-Tropics / NASA G-LiHT airborne campaign. See related datasets for sample details including photographs, leaf traits including leaf mass per area (LMA), water content, and leaf carbon and nitrogen.
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This dataset contains binary geotiff masks/classifications of six Arctic deltas for channels, lakes, land, and other small water bodies (see methods). Tiff files can be opened with any image viewer, but use of georeferencing data attached to the imagery will require a GIS platform (e.g., QGIS). Dataset includes individually classified scene masks for Colville (2014), Kolyma (2014), Lena (2016), Mackenzie (2014), Yenisei (2013), and Yukon (2014). We also provide .mat files for each delta that include a 2D array of the mosaicked images that is cropped to include only the area used in our analyses (see Piliouras and Rowland, Marine Geology), as well as the X (easting) and Y (northing) arrays for georeferencing, with coordinates in UTMs.
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This data package contains meteorological and surface data at the Barro Colorado Island (BCI) and Bosque Protector San Lorenzo (Fort Sherman) NGEE Tropics sites in Panama. Data has been converted into formats usable by the land-models driving the Functionally-Assembled Terrestrial Ecosystem Simulator (FATES). Surface datasets are model release dependent and may have to be re-processed for later versions of the model. Current surface datasets based off of "<>_16pfts_Irrig_CMIP6_simyr2000_c170824.nc" See the README_ngeet_lm_driver text file in the attached zip file for detailed descriptions of the included data files.
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Data associated with analysis of sediment samples collected in the East River watershed and Rifle floodplain sites, CO. Samples were collected and analyzed as part of two student MS theses at Colorado School of Mines (Kenwell and Prugue) over a time period ranging from 2012 to 2015. Analyses include total organic carbon, leachable Fe and Mn, and total microbial DNA; all analyses performed at Colorado School of Mines. Methods: Samples were collected from core during a drilling campaign at the Rifle Site. Samples were collected every 1.5 m. At the East River site soil and sediment samples were collected using hand-augered bulk density sampler. Collected samples were stored at -20C until analysis. Samples were thawed in an anaerobic chamber and subsampled for extractions and DNA analysis. Samples for DNA analysis were freeze-dried, the remaining sample was oven dried and ground to 0.991 cm for TOC and leaching analysis. TOC analysis was performed on duplicate samples using a CM 5014 Coulometer (UIC, Joliet, IL, USA). Two chemical extractions were performed: hydroxylamine (HA) extraction of Fe and Mn adapted from Lovley et al., 1987 and synthetic precipitation (ppt) leaching adapted from EPA method 1312 (EPA, 1994) . For theHA extraction 3g of wet sediment was mixed with 150 mL of 0.5 N HCl in one bottle and another 3 g of sediment was mixed with 150 mL of 0.25 N hydroxylamine hydrochloride in 0.5 N HCl. Extraction were performed for 24 hours at room temperature after which samples of the liquid were removed and filtered to 0.45 micron and analyzed by ICP-AES. HA-reducible iron and manganese concentrations were determined by difference between the two extractions. For ppt leaches, a 60:40 sulfuric:nitric acid mixture was added to Milliq water to a pH of 4.2 and combined with sediment in a 20:1 mass ratio of acid to sediment. The extraction was performed for 18 hours at room temperature after which the samples of the liquid were removed and filtered to 0.45 micron and analyzed by ICP-AES. DNA was sampled from sediment using a PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit and extractions were performed according to manufactured instuctions with one adjustment, a 1 minute bead beating replaced the 10 minute vortexing step. Extracted DNA was stored at -20C. Quantitative PCR was performed in triplicate on a Roche LightCycler 480 system and working curves were created by amplifying environmental samples with primers and bead purifying them with Agencourt AMPure XP. Analysis was performed with a Qubit 2.0 Fluorometer and Qubit dsDNA High Sensitivity Assay Kit with results converted to copies using the URI Genomics and Sequencing Center converter (Staroscik, 2004). Additional method details can be found in Kenwell et al., 2016. Lovley, D.R., Phillips, E.J.P. (1987). Rapid assay for microbially reducible ferric iron in aquatic sediments. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 53(7), 1536-1540. Staroscik, A. (2004). Calculator for determining the number of copies of a template. URI Genomics & Sequencing Center. <http://cels.uri.edu/gsc/cndna.html>. EPA. (1994). Method 1312: Synthetic precipitation leaching procedure.
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Leaf Surface Temperature, Direct/Diffuse solar radiation, sap velocity, leaf gas exchange, and soil moisture content at or near the K14, K34, and B34 towers. These are mostly raw data from the data loggers, except in the case of the ICT sensors where the datalogger output was translated using ICT software.
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This dataset provides classified river channel masks of 14 reaches of 13 Arctic rivers, as well as masks showing areas of erosion and accretion along the rivers of specified time periods. These rivers include the: Colville River, Alaska; Indigirka River, Russia; Kolyma River, Russia; Koyukuk River, Alaska; Lena River, Alaska; Noatak River, Alaska; Ob River, Russia; Pechora River, Russia; Selawik River, Alaska; Taz River, Russia; Yana River, Russia; Yenisei River, Russia;, and the Yukon River, Alaska. The dataset was generated from a total of 114 images including landsat, higher resolution satellite imagery, and aerial photography over time periods ranging from the 1970s and 2016. A full list of the image dates, row and path (for Landsat), and pixel resolutions is provided in the dataset. These masks provide the source data for the erosion, accretion, and planform measurement provided in the companion dataset: ess-dive-017d706d9816228-20191022T025338246.
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