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  • Adenovirus e1a induces quiescent human cells to divide. We found that e1a causes global relocalization of the RB-proteins (RB, p130, p107) and p300/CBP histone acetyltransferases on promoters that restricts H3K18ac to a limited set of genes to stimulate cell cycling and inhibit antiviral responses and cellular differentiation. Soon after expression, e1a binds transiently to cell cycle/growth genes, causing enrichment of p300/CBP, PCAF, H3K18ac, depletion of RB-proteins, and transcriptional activation. e1a also associates transiently with antiviral genes, causing enrichment for RB, p130, H4K16ac, increased nucleosome density, and repression. At later times, e1a and p107 bind mainly to development/differentiation genes, repressing transcription. The temporal order of e1a binding required its interactions with p300/CBP and RB-proteins. Our data uncover a defined transcriptional and epigenetic reprogramming leading to cellular transformation. Expression profiles and ChIP on chip genomewide experiments with deltaCR2 mutant virus
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  • The body’s defense against schistosome infection can take many forms. For example, upon developing acute schistosomiasis, patients often have fever coinciding with larval maturation, migration and early oviposition. As the infection becomes established, the parasite comes under oxidative stress generated by the host immune system. The most common treatment for schistosomiasis is the anti-helmenthic drug praziquantel. Its effectiveness, however, is limited due to its inability to kill schistosomes 2 - 4 weeks post-infection. Clearly there is a need for new anti-schistosomal drugs. We hypothesize that gene products expressed as part of a protective response against heat and/or oxidative stress are potential therapeutic targets for future drug development. Using a 12,166 element oligonucleotide microarray to characterize Schistosoma mansoni genes induced by heat and oxidative stress we found that 1,878 Schistosoma mansoni elements were significantly induced by heat stress. These included previously reported heat-shock genes expressing homologs of HSP40, HSP70 and HSP86. One thousand and one elements were induced by oxidative stress including those expressing homologs of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and aldehyde dehydrogenase. Seventy-two elements were common to both stressors that could potentially be exploited in the development of novel anti-schistosomal therapeutics. Keywords: Stress response, time course Eight samples performed in duplicate for each temperature and oxidative stresses at time points 0, 30, 60, and 240 min over a common reference sample for each stress
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  • Series of 6 repetitions of hybridization of treatment (PSI_DCMU) and control (PSI) each. Comparison of plants grown under PSI-specific light and treated with the electron transport inhibitor DCMU versus plants grown under PSI-specific light without DCMU treatment. T. Pfannschmidt, unpublished Keywords: repeat sample
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  • Series of 6 repetitions of hybridization of treatment (pCK) and control (H2O) each. Comparison of cytokinin-treated (2 h) cell culture versus untreated cell culture. T. Schmüllig, unpublished Keywords: repeat sample
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  • Series of 6 repetitions of hybridization of treatment (laf6_L_1h) and control (WT_D) each. Comparison of Arabidopsis laf6 mutant lacking the atABC1-transporter versus WT. laf6 exposed to normal light for 1 h after dark adaptation, WT dark adapted. S.G. Moeller et al., Genes Dev 15 (2001), pp. 90-103 Keywords: repeat sample
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  • Series of 4 repetitions of hybridization of treatment (pCO2_1d) and control (0d) each. Comparison of plants grown for 1 d at high-CO2 levels of (1 % (v/v) CO2) versus normal CO2 levels. E. Richly et al., EMBO Rep. 4 (2003), pp. 491–498 Keywords: repeat sample
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  • Series of 6 repetitions of hybridization of treatment (fluD) and control (WT) each. Comparison of Arabidopsis flu mutant lacking FLU, a regulator of chlorophyll biosynthesis, versus WT. Both harvested after a period of 12 h darkness. R. Meskauskiene et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98 (2001), pp. 12826-12831 Keywords: repeat sample
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  • Series of 6 repetitions of hybridization of treatment (PSII_DCMU) and control (PSI) each. Comparison of plants grown under PSII-specific light and treated with the electron transport inhibitor DCMU versus plants grown under PSI-specific light without DCMU treatment. T. Pfannschmidt, unpublished Keywords: repeat sample
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  • Series of 4 repetitions of hybridization of treatment (atpd) and control (WT) each. Comparison of Arabidopsis atpd mutant lacking ATP synthase delta subunit versus WT. D. Maiwald et al., Plant Physiol 133 (2003), pp. 191-202 Keywords: repeat sample
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