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  • 1000 simulated data sets stored in a list of R dataframes used in support of Reisetter et al. (submitted) 'Mixture model normalization for non-targeted gas chromatography / mass spectrometry metabolomics data'. These are results after normalization using mixnorm as described in Reisetter et al.
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
  • 1000 simulated data sets stored in a list of R dataframes used in support of Reisetter et al. (submitted) 'Mixture model normalization for non-targeted gas chromatography / mass spectrometry metabolomics data'. These are results after normalization using quantile normalization (Bolstad et al. 2003).
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
  • 1000 simulated data sets stored in a list of R dataframes used in support of Reisetter et al. (submitted) 'Mixture model normalization for non-targeted gas chromatography / mass spectrometry metabolomics data'. These are results after normalization using quantile + ComBat (Johnson et al. 2007).
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
  • In recent years, Americans have become more affectively polarized: that is, ordinary Democrats and Republicans increasingly dislike and distrust members of the opposing party. Such polarization is normatively troubling, as it exacerbates gridlock and dissensus in Washington. Given these negative consequences, I investigate whether it is possible to ameliorate this partisan discord. Building on the Common Ingroup Identity Model from social psychology, I show that by heightening subjects’ sense of American national identity, they come to see members of the opposing party as fellow Americans, rather than rival partisans. As a result, they like the opposing party more, thereby reducing affective polarization. Using several original experiments, as well as a natural experiment surrounding the July 4th holiday and the 2008 Summer Olympics, I find strong support for my argument. I conclude by discussing the implications of these findings for efforts to reduce polarization more generally.
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Tabular Data
    • Document
  • Review of Economics and Statistics: Forthcoming
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Tabular Data
    • Document
    • Text
  • Together, the datasets and .do files replicate Tables 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 from "The long and short of it: The unpredictability of late deciding voters." For a description of the variables used in each model, see the paper and .do file.
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Tabular Data
    • Document
  • This study contains CORONA satellite images that were used to identify sites and landscape features in northeastern Syria and adjacent regions. Most prominently, they are the source for the maps of sites and premodern trackways that appear in Ur, J. A. in press. Urbanism and Cultural Landscapes in Northeastern Syria: The Tell Hamoukar Survey, 1999-2001. Oriental Institute Publications 139. Chicago: University of Chicago Oriental Institute. All images are in Erdas Imagine (.img) format and are in the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) projection (Zone 37 north) using the WGS 1984 datum. For more information on the processing and interpretation of these CORONA scenes, see the above monograph.
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Document
    • File Set
  • Contains data and replication code for the empirical results in "The Politics of Central Bank Appointments"
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Software/Code
    • Tabular Data
    • Text
  • In recent years, Americans have become more affectively polarized: that is, ordinary Democrats and Republicans increasingly dislike and distrust members of the opposing party. Such polarization is normatively troubling, as it exacerbates gridlock and dissensus in Washington. Given these negative consequences, I investigate whether it is possible to ameliorate this partisan discord. Building on the Common Ingroup Identity Model from social psychology, I show that by heightening subjects’ sense of American national identity, they comes to see members of the opposing party as fellow Americans, rather than rival partisans. As a result, they like the opposing party more, thereby reducing affective polarization. Using several original experiments, as well as a natural experiment surrounding the July 4th holiday and the 2008 Summer Olympics, I find strong support for my argument. I conclude by discussing the implications of these findings for efforts to reduce polarization more generally.
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Tabular Data
    • Document
  • Based on findings from the literature on campaign effects on the one hand, and the literature on European Parliament elections on the other, we propose a model of European Parliamentary elections in which the campaign shift the calculus of electoral support, making differences in national political allegiances less important and attitudes about the European project more important by informing voters of and getting them interested in European politics. In effect, we argue that the political campaign leading up to the election makes European Parliament elections less second-order. While previous studies have demonstrated that EU attitudes can matter for voting behavior in European Parliament elections, existing research has drawn on post-election surveys that do not enable us to capture campaign effects. Our contribution is to assess the impact of a campaign by utilizing a rolling cross sectional survey (RCS) that enables us to track how voters were affected by the campaign. Our findings show that campaigns do have an effect on European Parliament election outcomes, in that they provide information that enables voters to make decisions based on European issues, making voter decision-making more dominated by EU issue voting.
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Tabular Data
    • Text
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