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Coherent control of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond’s triplet spin state has traditionally been accomplished with resonant ac magnetic fields. Here, we show that high-frequency stress resonant with the spin state splitting can also coherently control NV center spins. Because this mechanical drive is parity non-conserving, controlling spins with stress enables direct access to the magnetically forbidden |−1〉↔|+1〉 spin transition. Using a bulk-mode mechanical microresonator fabricated from single-crystal diamond, we apply intense ac stress to the diamond substrate and observe mechanically driven Rabi oscillations between the |−1〉 and |+1〉 states of an NV center spin ensemble. Additionally, we measure the inhomogeneous spin dephasing time (T2*) of the spin ensemble within this {−1,+1} subspace using a mechanical Ramsey sequence and compare it to the dephasing times measured with a magnetic Ramsey sequence for each of the three spin qubit combinations available within the NV center ground state. These results demonstrate coherent control of a spin with a mechanical resonator and could lead to the creation of a phase-sensitive Δ-system inside the NV center ground state with potential applications in quantum optomechanics and metrology.
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Recent evidence suggests that ongoing brain oscillations may be instrumental in binding and integrating multisensory signals. In the present experiment, we investigated the temporal dynamics of visual-motor integration processes. We show that action modulates sensitivity to visual contrast discrimination in a rhythmic fashion at frequencies of about 5Hz (in the theta range), for up to one second after execution of action. To understand the origin of the oscillations, we measured oscillations in contrast sensitivity at different levels of luminance, which is known to affect the endogenous brain rhythms, boosting the power of alpha-frequencies. We found that the frequency of oscillation in sensitivity increased at low-luminance, likely reflecting the shift in mean endogenous brain rhythm towards higher frequencies. Importantly, both at high and at low luminance, contrast discrimination showed a rhythmic motor-induced suppression effect, with the suppression occurring earlier at low luminance. We suggest that oscillations play a key role in sensory-motor integration, and that the motor-induced suppression may reflect the first manifestation of a rhythmic oscillation.
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  • Dataset
Recent evidence suggests that ongoing brain oscillations may be instrumental in binding and integrating multisensory signals. In the present experiment, we investigated the temporal dynamics of visual-motor integration processes. We show that action modulates sensitivity to visual contrast discrimination in a rhythmic fashion at frequencies of about 5Hz (in the theta range), for up to one second after execution of action. To understand the origin of the oscillations, we measured oscillations in contrast sensitivity at different levels of luminance, which is known to affect the endogenous brain rhythms, boosting the power of alpha-frequencies. We found that the frequency of oscillation in sensitivity increased at low-luminance, likely reflecting the shift in mean endogenous brain rhythm towards higher frequencies. Importantly, both at high and at low luminance, contrast discrimination showed a rhythmic motor-induced suppression effect, with the suppression occurring earlier at low luminance. We suggest that oscillations play a key role in sensory-motor integration, and that the motor-induced suppression may reflect the first manifestation of a rhythmic oscillation.
Data Types:
  • Dataset
Recent evidence suggests that ongoing brain oscillations may be instrumental in binding and integrating multisensory signals. In the present experiment, we investigated the temporal dynamics of visual-motor integration processes. We show that action modulates sensitivity to visual contrast discrimination in a rhythmic fashion at frequencies of about 5Hz (in the theta range), for up to one second after execution of action. To understand the origin of the oscillations, we measured oscillations in contrast sensitivity at different levels of luminance, which is known to affect the endogenous brain rhythms, boosting the power of alpha-frequencies. We found that the frequency of oscillation in sensitivity increased at low-luminance, likely reflecting the shift in mean endogenous brain rhythm towards higher frequencies. Importantly, both at high and at low luminance, contrast discrimination showed a rhythmic motor-induced suppression effect, with the suppression occurring earlier at low luminance. We suggest that oscillations play a key role in sensory-motor integration, and that the motor-induced suppression may reflect the first manifestation of a rhythmic oscillation.
Data Types:
  • Dataset
Recent evidence suggests that ongoing brain oscillations may be instrumental in binding and integrating multisensory signals. In the present experiment, we investigated the temporal dynamics of visual-motor integration processes. We show that action modulates sensitivity to visual contrast discrimination in a rhythmic fashion at frequencies of about 5Hz (in the theta range), for up to one second after execution of action. To understand the origin of the oscillations, we measured oscillations in contrast sensitivity at different levels of luminance, which is known to affect the endogenous brain rhythms, boosting the power of alpha-frequencies. We found that the frequency of oscillation in sensitivity increased at low-luminance, likely reflecting the shift in mean endogenous brain rhythm towards higher frequencies. Importantly, both at high and at low luminance, contrast discrimination showed a rhythmic motor-induced suppression effect, with the suppression occurring earlier at low luminance. We suggest that oscillations play a key role in sensory-motor integration, and that the motor-induced suppression may reflect the first manifestation of a rhythmic oscillation.
Data Types:
  • Dataset
We demonstrate the breakup of spatial-polarization entangled lasing patterns, which possess vector phase singularities, and the resultant dynamic instabilities featuring chaotic oscillations. The frequency splitting between a pair of Ince–Gauss (IG) lasing modes, originally forming a coherent entanglement state, and a self-excited additional nonorthogonal IG mode through a new class of transverse effect of self-injection pattern seeding, is shown to result in modal-interference-induced modulation at the beat frequency, leading to chaotic oscillations.
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We demonstrate the breakup of spatial-polarization entangled lasing patterns, which possess vector phase singularities, and the resultant dynamic instabilities featuring chaotic oscillations. The frequency splitting between a pair of Ince–Gauss (IG) lasing modes, originally forming a coherent entanglement state, and a self-excited additional nonorthogonal IG mode through a new class of transverse effect of self-injection pattern seeding, is shown to result in modal-interference-induced modulation at the beat frequency, leading to chaotic oscillations.
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Axial head-rolling oscillation frequencies determined from 28 video sequences obtained from 13 individual shrikes.
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  • Dataset
Axial head-rolling oscillation frequencies determined from 28 video sequences obtained from 13 individual shrikes.
Data Types:
  • Dataset
Axial head-rolling oscillation frequencies determined from 28 video sequences obtained from 13 individual shrikes.
Data Types:
  • Dataset
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