Filter Results
86 results
  • theta oscillations... gamma oscillations... netzwork oscillations
    Data Types:
    • Other
  • time-frequency analysis... event-related oscillations
    Data Types:
    • Other
  • As the hippocampal output structure, the subiculum’s purpose is to integrate and distribute mne-monic and spatial information to various cortical and subcortical brain regions. The subiculum is also involved in the pathophysiology of neurological conditions such as epilepsy and schizo- phrenia. Network oscillations in the gamma (30-100 Hz) frequency range as well as sharp wave ripple oscillations (100-250 Hz) are most prominent within the hippocampal formation. Both rhythms appear to be functionally connected and are involved in memory storage and retrieval. Within the subiculum, there are two types of principal cells (PC) that can be discriminated based on their firing properties following a depolarizing current injection: intrinsically bursting (IB) and regular spiking (RS) neurons. So far, it remains uninvestigated how these two distinct su-bicular PC classes participate in oscillatory network activity. Using an in vitro model that allows the investigation of sharp wave and gamma frequency oscillations in the subiculum, simultane-ous local field potential and sharp microelectrode recordings were made in 400 μm thick murine hippocampal slices. The intrinsic and synaptic properties of subicular PCs as well as their func-tional involvement in the two major oscillatory rhythms were investigated. Biocytin was used for the morphological identification of recorded neurons. Morphologically, the electrically identified neurons display the typical shape of pyramidal cells. Interestingly, one pair of IB, but not RS cells, shows dye coupling which has been suggested to be the morphological correlate of electric synapses. The results reveal furthermore, that in addition to the electrophysiological dichotomy and distinct firing properties of the subicular PC classes, there exists a strict functional segrega-tion of the active, participating IB cells and mostly silent RS cells during both network states. The silent RS PCs appear to require a higher network activation than IB PCs in order to partici- pate in the oscillatory activity. When depolarized above threshold, they show a cell-type specific and independent firing pattern in correlation to the local field. This suggests a bimodal working model within the subiculum dependent on the level of network excitation. Additionally, the su-bicular IB and RS cells reveal divergent synaptic properties in the active network which suggest distinct synaptic connectivity and possibly input structures. These results altogether indicate a functional cell-type-specific segregation of subicular PCs representing two independent and par-allel streams of information processing within the subiculum resulting in two distinct processing channels within the hippocampal formation.,Als efferentes Organ der hippocampalen Formation entsendet das Subiculum prozessierte mne-monische und räumliche Information zu verschiedenen kortikalen und subkortikalen Gehirnregi-onen. Außerdem ist das Subiculum an der Pathophysiologie neurologischer Erkrankungen wie der Epilepsie und Schizophrenie beteiligt. Netzwerkoszillationen im Gamma-Frequenzbereich (30-100 Hz) und Sharp Wave Ripple Oszillationen (100-250 Hz) spielen eine besondere Rolle in der hippocampalen Formation. Beide Rhythmen sind funktionell vergesellschaftet und an der Speicherung und dem Abruf von Gedächtnisinhalten beteiligt. Im Subiculum gibt es zwei Arten von Prinzipalzellen, die anhand ihrer Reaktion auf die Applikation depolarisierender Strominjek-tionen unterschieden werden: intrinsically bursting (IB) und regular spiking (RS) Zellen. Bisher ist es allerdings unklar, wie die beiden Zelltypen an der subicularen Netzwerkaktivität beteiligt sind. Anhand eines in vitro Modells, das sowohl die Untersuchung von Sharp Waves als auch von Gamma Oszillationen erlaubt, wurden in 400 μm dicken murinen hippocampalen Schnitten simultan Aufnahmen lokaler Feldpotentiale und mithilfe der sharp microelectrode Technik intra-zelluläre Aufnahmen durchgeführt. Die intrinsischen und synaptischen Eigenschaften subicularer Prinzipalzellen und ihre funktionelle Bedeutung während beider Netzwerkrhythmen wurden un-tersucht. Biocytin diente der morphologischen Identifizierung. Die elektrophysiologisch identifi-zierten Zellen zeigen die typische Form von Pyramidalzellen. Dye Coupling, das dem morpholo-gischen Korrelat elektrischer Synapsen entsprechen soll, kann in einem IB Zellpaar aber nicht in RS Zellen nachgewiesen werden. In Ergänzung zu der elektrophysiologischen Dichotomie und dem individuellen Feuerverhalten, wird zudem eine funktionelle und zelltyp-spezifische Tren-nung der Netzwerkbeteiligung im Subiculum deutlich. Die Mehrheit der IB Zellen zeigen aktives und am Netzwerk beteiligtes Verhalten, während die RS Zellen im Großteil unbeteiligt und „still“ sind. RS Zellen scheinen eine stärkere Netzwerkerregung zu benötigen, um an den Net-zoszillationen teilzunehmen. Werden die RS Zellen jedoch über das Schwellenpotential hinaus depolarisiert, zeigen sie ein zelltyp-spezifisches und unabhängiges Aktivitätsmuster in strikter Korrelation zum Netzwerk. Folglich kann ein bimodales Arbeitsmodell im Subiculum ange-nommen werden, das abhängig von dem Level subiculärer Netzwerkerregung ist. Des Weiteren unterscheiden sich die synaptischen Potentiale subicularer IB und RS Zellen deutlich voneinan-der. Das deutet darauf hin, dass sowohl die zelluläre Verschaltung als auch die afferenten Struk-turen subicularer Prinzipalzellen unterschiedlich sein müssen. Zusammenfassend erlauben die Ergebnisse den Rückschluss, dass eine funktionelle und zelltyp-spezifische Separation subicularer IB und RS Zellen existiert, die zwei voneinander unabhängige und parallele Kanäle der In- formationsverarbeitung repräsentieren.,
    Data Types:
    • Other
  • oscillations
    Data Types:
    • Other
  • Oscillation
    Data Types:
    • Other
  • Gamma oscillation
    Data Types:
    • Other
  • SEP high frequency oscillation
    Data Types:
    • Other
  • oscillations
    Data Types:
    • Other
  • In the first optic neuropil (lamina) of the optic lobe of Drosophila melanogaster, two classes of synapses, tetrad and feedback, show daily rhythms in the number and size of presynaptic profiles examined at the level of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Number of tetrad presynaptic profiles increases twice a day, once in the morning and again in the evening, and their presynaptic ribbons are largest in the evening. In contrast, feedback synapses peak at night. The frequency of synapses is correlated with size of the presynaptic element measured as the platform size of so-called T-bars, with T-bar platforms being largest with increasing synapse frequency. The large scaffold protein Bruchpilot (BRP) is a major essential constituent of T-bars, with two major isoforms of 190 and 170 kD forming T-bars of the peripheral neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) synapses and in the brain. In addition to the analysis of cyclic plasticity of tetrad and feedback synapses in wild-type flies, we used TEM to examine daily changes in the size and distribution of synapses within isoform-specific BRP mutants, expressing BRP-190 (BRPΔ170) or BRP-170 (BRPΔ190) only. We found that the number and circadian plasticity of synapses depends on both isoforms. In the BRPΔ190 lacking BRP-190 there was almost 50% less tetrad synapses demonstrable than when both isoforms were present. The lack of BRP-170 and BRP-190 increased and decreased, respectively the number of feedback synapses, indicating that BRP-190 forms most of the feedback synapses. In both mutants, the daily plasticity of tetrad and feedback presynaptic profiles was abolished, except for feedback synapses in BRPΔ190. The oscillations in the number and size of presynaptic elements seem to depend on a different contribution of BRP isoforms in a presynaptic element at different time during the day and night and at various synapse types. The participation of both BRP isoforms may vary in different classes of synapses.
    Data Types:
    • Other
  • The aim of my PhD thesis was to characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of two different types of neuronal large-scale oscillatory signals using electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In this synopsis I present three studies which emerged from this project and to which I contributed within the scope of my PhD thesis. The first part of my thesis deals with somatosensory evoked high frequency bursts (HFBs). These EEG oscillations at a frequency of 600 Hz constitute a unique possibility to noninvasively record population spikes of thalamocortical and cortical neurons in humans. In Study 1, we combined recordings of HFBs and fMRI in order to derive a noninvasive measure of spiking activity together with the slow vascular fMRI signal and the conventional low-frequency EEG, which is dominated by postsynaptic activity. Using an interleaved EEG-fMRI setup, where HFBs were recorded between fMRI acquisition periods, we were able to show that spatially distinct fMRI activations along the thalamocortical pathway could be attributed to spontaneous fluctuations of different HFB components separated only by milliseconds. Conventional EEG-fMRI approaches do not allow the continuous recording of high-frequency EEG signatures such as HFBs, since high-frequency fMRI-related imaging artifacts that contaminate the EEG cannot be removed using available methods. In Study 2, we therefore developed an EEG- fMRI setup including an enhanced artifact correction algorithm allowing for the continuous recovery of HFBs during fMRI. We thoroughly evaluated our setup not only for HFBs but also for spontaneous and evoked EEG signals ranging from 1 to 1000 Hz. Large-scale neuronal activity also occurs in the absence of any external stimuli or task, reflected in the EEG as ongoing oscillations. In the second part of my PhD thesis, I aimed to characterize such EEG oscillations with respect to nonlinearity and multistability. These are the classic hallmarks of complex, self-organizing systems, of which the brain is widely assumed to be a paradigmatic example. However, at the large scale of neocortical dynamics there is little empirical evidence for such features. In Study 3, we studied the temporal fluctuations of power in human resting-state EEG acquired both with and without fMRI and showed that key brain rhythms exhibit qualities such as bistability (bursting between high- and low- amplitude modes) in the alpha rhythm and irregular appearance of high amplitude “extremal” events in beta rhythm power fluctuations. These results challenge existing frameworks for understanding large-scale brain activity and suggest the development of more sophisticated generative models of brain dynamics.,Diese Doktorarbeit befasst sich mit zwei Arten von globalen neuronalen oszillatorischen Signalen im menschlichen Gehirn und der Charakterisierung ihrer räumlich-zeitlichen Dynamik mittels Elektroenzephalographie (EEG) und funktioneller Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRT). In der vorliegenden Synopsis werden die drei Veröffentlichungen vorgestellt, die aus diesem Projekt entstanden sind. Der erste Teil der Arbeit handelt von somatosensorisch evozierten hochfrequenten Oszillationen (high-frequency bursts, HFBs). Diese EEG Oszillationen mit einer Frequenz von 600 Hz stellen die einzigartige Möglichkeit dar, Massenaktionspotentiale nicht-invasiv am Menschen zu messen. In Studie 1 haben wir Aufnahmen dieser HFBs mit der fMRT kombiniert, um ein gleichzeitiges Messen von Aktionspotentialen, des langsamen vaskulären fMRT Signals und des konventionellen niedrigfrequenten EEGs zu ermöglichen. Mit Hilfe unseres EEG-fMRT Setups konnten wir räumlich getrennte fMRT Aktivierungen entlang der thalamokortikalen Bahn spontanen Flukuationen unterschiedlicher HFB-Komponenten zuordnen. Mit herkömmlichen EEG-fMRT Ansätzen ist es nicht möglich, hochfrequente EEG Signale wie HFBs kontinuierlich aufzunehmen, da die hochfrequenten fMRT-Artefakte, die das EEG kontaminieren, nicht hinreichend enfernt werden können. In Studie 2 haben wir deshalb einen EEG-fMRT Aufbau entwickelt, inklusive einer neuen Art von Artefaktreduzierung, der eine kontinuierliche Rekonstruierung der HFBs ermöglicht. Wir haben unseren Ansatz sowohl für HFBs als auch für spontane und evozierte EEG Signale im Frequenzbereich von 1 bis 1000 Hz evaluiert. Globale neuronale Aktivität ist auch in Abwesenheit externer Stimuli oder Aufgaben vorhanden und in Form spontaner Oszillationen im EEG messbar. Im zweiten Teil dieser Doktorarbeit war es das Ziel, diese Oszillationen genauer zu charakterisieren, vor allem im Hinblick auf Nichtlinearitäten und Multistabilität. Diese Eigenschaften sind die Markenzeichen komplexer, selbstorganisierender Systeme, und das Gehirn wird oft als ein klassisches Beispiel eines solchen Systems angesehen. Trotzdem gibt es - zumindest auf globaler neocortikaler Ebene - wenig Hinweise auf diese Eigenschaften. In Studie 3 haben wir daher die zeitlichen Power-Fluktuationen im menschlichen Ruhe-EEG gemessen und konnten zeigen, dass bestimmte Hirnrhythmen Eigenschaften wie Bistabilität und extreme Events besitzen. Diese Ergebnisse fechten existierende Ideen und Modelle an, die sich mit dem Verstehen von globaler Hirnaktivität befassen und geben einen Hinweis darauf, dass anspruchsvollere generative Modelle nötig sind, um die Dynamik des menschlichen Gehirns beschreiben zu können.,
    Data Types:
    • Other
3