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  • We put forward a technique to unveil to which symmetry group a nonlinear crystal belongs, making use of nonlinear optics with structured light. We consider as example the process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion. The crystal, which is illuminated with a special type of Bessel beam, is characterized by a nonlinear susceptibility tensor whose structure is dictated by the symmetry group of the crystal. The observation of the spatial angular dependence of the lower-frequency generated light provides direct information about the symmetry group of the crystal.
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  • Magnetic helicity has the remarkable property of being a conserved quantity of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Therefore, it could be used as an effective tracer of the magnetic field evolution of magnetized plasmas. Theoretical estimations indicate that magnetic helicity is also essentially conserved with non-ideal MHD processes, e.g. magnetic reconnection. This conjecture has however been barely tested, either experimentally or numerically. Thanks to recent advances in magnetic helicity estimation methods, it is now possible to test numerically its dissipation level in general three-dimensional datasets. We first revisit the general formulation of the temporal variation of relative magnetic helicity on a fully bounded volume when no hypothesis on the gauge are made. We introduce a method to precisely estimate its dissipation independently of the type of non-ideal MHD processes occurring. In a solar-like eruptive event simulation, using different gauges, we compare its estimation in a finite volume with its time-integrated flux through the boundaries, hence testing the conservation and dissipation of helicity. We provide an upper bound of the real dissipation of magnetic helicity: It is quasi-null during the quasi-ideal MHD phase. Even when magnetic reconnection is acting the relative dissipation of magnetic helicity is also very small (30 times larger). We finally illustrate how the helicity-flux terms involving velocity components are gauge dependent, hence limiting their physical meaning.
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  • We discuss the strong couplings $g_{PPV}$ and $g_{VVP}$ for vector ($V$) and pseudoscalar ($P$) mesons, at least one of which is a charmonium state $J/\psi$ or $\eta_c$. The strong couplings are obtained as residues at the poles of suitable form factors, calculated in a broad range of momentum transfers using a dispersion formulation of the relativistic constituent quark model. The form factors obtained in this approach satisfy all constraints known for these quantities in the heavy-quark limit. Our results suggest sizably higher values for the strong meson couplings than those reported in the literature from QCD sum rules.
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  • We extract the site energies and spectral densities of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) pigment protein complex of green sulphur bacteria from simulations of molecular dynamics combined with energy gap calculations. Comparing four different combinations of methods, we investigate the origin of quantitative differences regarding site energies and spectral densities obtained previously in the literature. We find that different forcefields for molecular dynamics and varying local energy minima found by the structure relaxation yield significantly different results. Nevertheless, a picture averaged over these variations is in good agreement with experiments and some other theory results. Throughout, we discuss how vibrations external- or internal to the pigment molecules enter the extracted quantities differently and can be distinguished. Our results offer some guidance to set up more computationally intensive calculations for a precise determination of spectral densities in the future. These are required to determine absorption spectra as well as transport properties of light-harvesting complexes.
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  • This paper presents a librational solution for evolutions of parameters averaged over a synodic period in mean motion resonances in planar circular restricted three-body problem (PCR3BP) with non-gravitational effects taken into account. The librational solution is derived from a linearization of modified Lagrange's planetary equations. The presented derivation respects properties of orbital evolutions in the mean motion resonances within the framework of the PCR3BP. All orbital evolutions in the PCR3BP with the non-gravitational effects can be described by four varying parameters. We used the semimajor axis, eccentricity, longitude of pericenter and resonant angular variable. The evolutions are found for all four parameters. The solution can be applied also in the case without the non-gravitational effects. We compared numerically and analytically obtained evolutions in the case when the non-gravitational effects are the Poynting-Robertson effect and the radial stellar wind. The librational solution is good approximation when the libration amplitude of the resonant angular variable is small.
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  • With the possibility of testing massive gravity in the context of black hole physics in mind, we consider the radiation produced by a particle plunging from slightly below the innermost stable circular orbit into a Schwarzschild black hole. In order to circumvent the difficulties associated with black hole perturbation theory in massive gravity, we use a toy model in which we replace the graviton field with a massive scalar field and consider a linear coupling between the particle and this field. We compute the waveform generated by the plunging particle and study its spectral content. This permits us to highlight and interpret some important effects occurring in the plunge regime which are not present for massless fields such as (i) the decreasing and vanishing, as the mass parameter increases, of the signal amplitude generated when the particle moves on quasicircular orbits near the innermost stable circular orbit and (ii) in addition to the excitation of the quasinormal modes, the excitation of the quasibound states of the black hole.
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  • The problem of the formation of the Moon is still not explained satisfactorily. While it is a generally accepted scenario that the last giant impact on Earth between some 50 to 100 million years after the starting of the formation of the terrestrial planets formed our natural satellite, there are still many open questions like the isotopic composition which is identical for these two bodies. In our investigation we will not deal with these problems of chemical composition but rather undertake a purely dynamical study to find out the probability of a Mars-sized body to collide with the Earth shortly after the formation of the Earth-like planets. For that we assume an additional massive body between Venus and Earth, respectively Earth and Mars which formed there at the same time as the other terrestrial planets. We have undertaken massive n-body integrations of such a planetary system with 4 inner planets (we excluded Mercury but assumed one additional body as mentioned before) for up to tens of millions of years. Our results led to a statistical estimation of the collision velocities as well as the collision angles which will then serve as the basis of further investigation with detailed SPH computations. We find a most probable origin of the Earth impactor at a semi-major axis of approx. 1.16 AU.
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  • In this paper we consider the issue of paradigm evaluation by applying Bayes' theorem along the following nested chain of progressively more complex structures: i) parameter estimation (within a model), ii) model selection and comparison (within a paradigm), iii) paradigm evaluation. In such a chain the Bayesian evidence works both as the posterior's normalization at a given level and as the likelihood function at the next level up. Whilst raising no objections to the standard application of the procedure at the two lowest levels, we argue that it should receive an essential modification when evaluating paradigms, in view of the issue of falsifiability. By considering toy models we illustrate how unfalsifiable models and paradigms are always favoured by the Bayes factor. We argue that the evidence for a paradigm should not only be high for a given dataset, but exceptional with respect to what it would have been, had the data been different. We propose a measure of falsifiability (which we term predictivity), and a prior to be incorporated into the Bayesian framework, suitably penalising unfalsifiability. We apply this measure to inflation seen as a whole, and to a scenario where a specific inflationary model is hypothetically deemed as the only one viable as a result of information alien to cosmology (e.g. Solar System gravity experiments, or particle physics input). We conclude that cosmic inflation is currently difficult to falsify and thus to be construed as a scientific theory, but that this could change were external/additional information to cosmology to select one of its many models. We also compare this state of affairs to bimetric varying speed of light cosmology.
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  • We report on the optical spectroscopic analysis of a sample of 99 low-luminosity quasi-stellar objects (LLQSOs) at $z\leq 0.06$ base the Hamburg/ESO QSO survey (HES). The LLQSOs presented here offer the possibility of studying the faint end of the QSO population at smaller cosmological distances and, therefore, in greater detail. A small number of our LLQSO present no broad component. Two sources show double broad components, whereas six comply with the classic NLS1 requirements. As expected in NLR of broad line AGNs, the [S{\sc{ii}}]$-$based electron density values range between 100 and 1000 N$_{e}$/cm$^{3}$. Using the optical characteristics of Populations A and B, we find that 50\% of our sources with H$\beta$ broad emission are consistent with the radio-quiet sources definition. The remaining sources could be interpreted as low-luminosity radio-loud quasar. The BPT-based classification renders an AGN/Seyfert activity between 50 to 60\%. For the remaining sources, the possible star burst contribution might control the LINER and HII classification. Finally, we discuss the aperture effect as responsible for the differences found between data sets, although variability in the BLR could play a significant role as well.
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  • We present a general regularization-based framework for Multi-task learning (MTL), in which the similarity between tasks can be learned or refined using $\ell_p$-norm Multiple Kernel learning (MKL). Based on this very general formulation (including a general loss function), we derive the corresponding dual formulation using Fenchel duality applied to Hermitian matrices. We show that numerous established MTL methods can be derived as special cases from both, the primal and dual of our formulation. Furthermore, we derive a modern dual-coordinate descend optimization strategy for the hinge-loss variant of our formulation and provide convergence bounds for our algorithm. As a special case, we implement in C++ a fast LibLinear-style solver for $\ell_p$-norm MKL. In the experimental section, we analyze various aspects of our algorithm such as predictive performance and ability to reconstruct task relationships on biologically inspired synthetic data, where we have full control over the underlying ground truth. We also experiment on a new dataset from the domain of computational biology that we collected for the purpose of this paper. It concerns the prediction of transcription start sites (TSS) over nine organisms, which is a crucial task in gene finding. Our solvers including all discussed special cases are made available as open-source software as part of the SHOGUN machine learning toolbox (available at \url{http://shogun.ml}).
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