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This survey of 12th-grade students is part of a series that explores changes in important values, behaviors, and lifestyle orientations of contemporary American youth. Students are randomly assigned to complete one of six questionnaires, each with a different subset of topical questions, but all containing a set of "core" questions on demographics and drug use. There are about 1,400 variables across the questionnaires. Drugs covered by this survey include tobacco, smokeless tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, hashish, prescription medications, over-the-counter medications, LSD, hallucinogens, amphetamines (stimulants), Ritalin (methylphenidate), Quaaludes (methaqualone), sedatives/barbiturates, tranquilizers, cocaine, crack cocaine, GHB (gamma hydroxybutyrate), ecstasy, methamphetamine, and heroin. Other topics include attitudes toward religion, changing roles for women, educational aspirations, self-esteem, exposure to drug education, and violence and crime (both in and out of school).
Data Types:
  • Other
  • Dataset
This collection of tweet IDs pertains to the first two weeks of the #MeToo hashtag campaign in October 2017. During this time period there were over 1.5 million tweets with the #MeToo hashtag. Tweets containing the hashtag #MeToo were collected retroactively from a full historical Twitter Firehose (100%) collection, and reply threads in response to those tweets were separately collected from Twitter. According to Twitter Terms of Service, full tweet objects cannot be disseminated, but the tweet IDs can be rehydrated through Twitter's public GET statuses/lookup API endpoint. The available data for this study exist in one zipped folder containing 28 files. There are 14 .csv files, one for each day, between October 15th to October 28th, containing the tweet ID with one tweet ID appearing per line. Each file only contains a single column of data ( tweet_id). There were on average 109,237 tweets per day during this two-week period ranging between 16,074 to 528,143 tweets per day. Tweets must have been public and not deleted or taken down at the time of collection in order to appear in this dataset. The other 14 .csv files correspond to the reply threads for each day in response to tweets containing the hashtag #MeToo. Each line indicates the tweet ID of a reply in a thread of replies to a #MeToo tweet ( tweet_id) and the tweet ID of the tweet immediately preceeding that tweet in the reply thread ( in_reply_to_tweet_id) as comma-separated values. There were on average 21,072 replies to tweets per day during this period with a range of 2,388 to 110,789 replies per day.
Data Types:
  • Other
  • Dataset
The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) Series, previously called the National Crime Surveys (NCS), has been collecting data on personal and household victimization through an ongoing survey of a nationally-representative sample of residential addresses since 1973. The NCVS was designed with four primary objectives: (1) to develop detailed information about the victims and consequences of crime, (2) to estimate the number and types of crimes not reported to the police, (3) to provide uniform measures of selected types of crimes, and (4) to permit comparisons over time and types of areas. The survey categorizes crimes as "personal" or "property." Personal crimes include rape and sexual attack, robbery, aggravated and simple assault, and purse-snatching/pocket-picking, while property crimes include burglary, theft, motor vehicle theft, and vandalism. Each respondent is asked a series of screen questions designed to determine whether she or he was victimized during the six-month period preceding the first day of the month of the interview. A "household respondent" is also asked to report on crimes against the household as a whole (e.g., burglary, motor vehicle theft). The data include type of crime, month, time, and location of the crime, relationship between victim and offender, characteristics of the offender, self-protective actions taken by the victim during the incident and results of those actions, consequences of the victimization, type of property lost, whether the crime was reported to police and reasons for reporting or not reporting, and offender use of weapons, drugs, and alcohol. Basic demographic information such as age, race, gender, and income is also collected, to enable analysis of crime by various subpopulations. This version of the NCVS, referred to as the collection year, contains records from interviews conducted in the 12 months of the given year.
Data Types:
  • Other
  • Dataset
Tsogolo la Thanzi (TLT) is a longitudinal study in Balaka, Malawi designed to examine how young people navigate reproduction in an AIDS epidemic. Tsogolo la Thanzi means "Healthy Futures" in Chichewa, Malawi's most widely spoken language. New data is being collected to develop better understandings of the reproductive goals and behavior of young adults in Malawi -- the first cohort to never have experienced life without AIDS. To understand these patterns of family formation in a rapidly changing setting, TLT used the following approach: an intensive longitudinal design where respondents are interviewed every four months at TLT's centralized research center. Data collection began in May of 2009 and was completed in June of 2012. To assess changes on a longer time-horizon, a follow-up survey referred to as Tsogolo la Thanzi 2 (TLT-2) was fielded between June and August of 2016. This study contains data collected from the third wave of the multi-wave study. Each wave is comprised of three data files. The Women dataset (dataset 1) is a random sample of women aged 15-25 in 2009 (N=1,505 at wave 1), drawn from a census of the area. Likewise, the Random Men dataset (dataset 3) is a random-sample of men aged 15-25 in 2009 (N=574 at wave 1) drawn from a census of the area. The Male Partners dataset (dataset 2) contains survey data from sexual and romantic partners who were referred into the study by respondents in the women's file; this is a non-random sample of male partners, so analysts should be especially cautious with inferences. Topics covered across all waves include relationships, religion, HIV/AIDS, politics, family composition, mental health, sex and protection, pregnancy, marriage, sexually transmitted diseases, future expectations, school enrollment status, goods purchased/received, and diet. Modules specific to wave 3 include: relationship power. Additional demographic variables in each dataset include age and education.
Data Types:
  • Other
  • Dataset
The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), previously called the National Crime Survey (NCS), has been collecting data on personal and household victimization through an ongoing survey of a nationally-representative sample of residential addresses since 1973. The NCVS was designed with four primary objectives: (1) to develop detailed information about the victims and consequences of crime, (2) to estimate the number and types of crimes not reported to the police, (3) to provide uniform measures of selected types of crimes, and (4) to permit comparisons over time and types of areas. Beginning in 1992, the survey categorizes crimes as "personal" or "property." Personal crimes include rape and sexual assault, robbery, aggravated and simple assault, and purse-snatching/pocket-picking, while property crimes include burglary, theft, motor vehicle theft, and vandalism. Each respondent is asked a series of screen questions designed to determine whether she or he was victimized during the six-month period preceding the first day of the month of the interview. A "household respondent" is also asked to report on crimes against the household as a whole (e.g., burglary, motor vehicle theft). The data include type of crime, month, time, and location of the crime, relationship between victim and offender, characteristics of the offender, self-protective actions taken by the victim during the incident and results of those actions, consequences of the victimization, type of property lost, whether the crime was reported to police and reasons for reporting or not reporting, and offender use of weapons, drugs, and alcohol. Basic demographic information such as age, race, gender, and income is also collected to enable analysis of crime by various subpopulations. This dataset represents the revised concatenated version of the NCVS on a collection year basis for 1992-2016. A collection year contains records from interviews conducted in the 12 months of the given year. Under the collection year format, victimizations are counted in the year the interview is conducted, regardless of the year when the crime incident occurred. The 2016 National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) violent and property crime estimates were significantly higher than 2015, but it was not possible to determine the degree to which the change in rates resulted from the sample redesign rather than real changes in U.S. victimization levels. Therefore, the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) examined the 2015 and 2016 victimization rates separately for new and continuing sample counties in the 2016 Criminal Victimization bulletin. The BJS requested that the U.S. Census Bureau create a 2016 revised file with outgoing county interviews from July-December 2015, continuing county interviews from January-June 2016, and all interviews (continuing and new counties) from July-December 2016. In other words, the outgoing 2015 cases replaced the new 2016 cases in the first half of 2016. The files in this study serve as a separate research file to allow data users to make comparisons between 2015, 2016, and 2017 NCVS estimates using a nationally representative sample. It provides a sample that still represents the entire country but does not have the inflated crime rates seen in the new counties in 2016. For additional information on the dataset, please see the documentation for the data from the most current year of the NCVS, ICPSR Study 37296.
Data Types:
  • Other
  • Dataset
These surveys of 8th- and 10th-grade students are part of a series that explores changes in important values, behaviors, and lifestyle orientations of contemporary American youth. Students in each grade are randomly assigned to complete one of four questionnaires, each with a different subset of topical questions but containing a set of "core" questions on demographics and drug use. There are more than 450 variables across the questionnaires. Drugs covered by this survey include amphetamines (stimulants), barbiturates (tranquilizers), other prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, tobacco, smokeless tobacco, vaping, alcohol, inhalants, steroids, marijuana, hashish, LSD, hallucinogens, cocaine, crack, ecstasy, methamphetamine, and injectable drugs such as heroin.
Data Types:
  • Other
  • Dataset
The nation's libraries, museums, historical societies, archives, and scientific institutions hold in their collections 13 billion items, from furniture to photos and sheet music to soil samples. These make up the tangible objects of the United States' national heritage and are cataloged, shelved, stored, and protected. Digital collections are now reaching new audiences and challenging institutions large and small. In 2004, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) supported Heritage Preservation in conducting the Heritage Health Index Survey (HHIS). This survey assessed the preservation needs of America's cultural heritage institutions and provided a benchmarking tool for collections care practice. Ten years later, IMLS took a look at where collections care and management challenges and opportunities stood. The 2014 survey included many questions similar to those in 2004 and introduced new questions about preservation of digital collections. The data contains records for 1,714 collecting institutions. The sample was stratified by type of institution (archives, historical societies, libraries, museums, and scientific collections) and size (large/medium or small). These institutions represent a universe of 31,290 collecting institutions. For the purposes of HHIS, eligibility was based on whether institutions had accepted preservation responsibility for collections of nonliving tangible and digital collections but excluded collections meant to be used by visitors or patrons and disposed of or replaced if they are lost or damaged.
Data Types:
  • Other
  • Dataset
This is a comprehensive meta-analysis of available research on the effects of intervention programs for adult offenders, which is based on 801 eligible controlled studies reported through 2014 identified by researchers. Variables describing the intervention, participating offender samples, research methods, and effects found on a range of outcome constructs were coded into a database for analysis. The major outcome categories examined were recidivism, substance use, employment, mental health, anger/hostility, and aggression/violence. Broad intervention approaches included those such as cognitive behavioral, structured group, counseling, and drug court programs. The meta-analysis seeks to examine outcomes of various types of interventions and identify the characteristics of programs and participants most closely associated with positive outcomes. It seeks to use the findings to construct and obtain feedback on effective practice guidelines within the adult correctional system.
Data Types:
  • Other
  • Dataset
To increase understanding of the prosecution of Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children and Youth (CSEC) offenders, the Urban Institute, a non-partisan social and economic policy research organization, along with Polaris Project, an anti-human trafficking organization based in the United States and Japan, were awarded a cooperative agreement from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) to conduct a 12-month study on CSEC in the United States. The purpose of this research was to conduct a national analysis of federal prosecutions of CSEC-related cases from 1998 through 2005, in order to answer the following four research questions: Is the United States enforcing existing federal laws related to CSEC? What are key features of successfully prosecuted CSEC cases? What factors predict convictions in cases? What factors predict sentence length? Have the U.S. courts increased penalties associated with sexual crimes against children? What, if any, are the effects of CSEC legislation on service providers who work with these victims? The data collection includes three datasets: (Dataset 1) Base Cohort File with 7,696 cases for 50 variables, (Dataset 2) Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (CSEC) Defendants in cases filed in U.S. Court with 7,696 cases for 100 variables, and (Dataset 3) Suspects in Criminal Matters Investigated and Concluded by U.S. Attorneys Dataset with 13,819 cases for 14 variables.
Data Types:
  • Other
  • Dataset
These data collection and analysis protocols and the attribute list are part of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation funded project, "The Researcher Passport: Improving Data Access and Confidentiality Protection." The research questions concern the accessibility of data that require special, restricted access conditions, and the possibility of increasing access and utility of these data through a shared digital access credential. The project employed mixed methods, and collected data repository documentation related to data access and re-use policies and procedures, as well as interviews with data repository staff about organizational policies and processes to authorize access to restricted data. The interview protocol relates to nine interviews conducted with repository staff, and the codeset relates to these nine interviews, notes from a stakeholder meeting, and the 355 pieces of documentation provided by 23 data repositories. This study includes no data at this time. Additional data and documentation will be made available at a later date. When these materials are available, users will be able to download the updated versions of the study.
Data Types:
  • Other
  • Dataset
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