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In recent years powerful and inexpensive Virtual Reality ecosystems have become widely available, a side effect of the cellphone revolution. Both the archaeological and software development communities have struggled with both the pace of change and the unique properties of the medium, with the result that many projects have had mixed and inconsistent outcomes. In this thesis I argue that VR adds significant adjunctive capabilities to several areas of archaeological inquiry—wayfinding, space and place, landscape archaeology and saliency theory in particular—as well as offering real explanatory potential for questions of identity and materiality. I suggest that, to date, this potential does not appear to have been realized, and that this delay can likely be ascribed to the ‘teething problems’ of understanding, and engaging, with a novel medium. Given the expense of retaining development resources, together with growing skill shortages, I suggest that there is a requirement for a more structured and efficient approach, one that both identifies and engages with key issues and key opportunities in the field of VR-centric research and provides a framework for archaeological collaboration.
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Acta Praehistorica et Archaeologica, Bd. 47 (2015)
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-,Ausgrabungen und Funde in Westfalen-Lippe, Ausgrabungen und Funde in Westfalen-Lippe 14 (2018/2019),
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The Thünen Institute organized and hosted a PhD-Summer school on science based policy advice took place in Braunschweig and Trenthorst from the 12th to 16th August 2019. During the summer school professionals in the field of giving policy advice based on scientific facts with different scientific backgrounds gave lectures and an excursion to the Thünen Institute of Organic Agriculture was done. Participants were 16 stipends PhD stipends of the Federal Office for Agriculture and Food (BLE) from Africa and Iran. This working paper summarizes all lectures and results, as well as reflections from lessons learned from the practical exercise.,DOI:10.3220/WP1582202244000,
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This thesis pursues an exploration of collective moments of happiness in the city and their potential under experimental preservation discourse to re-frame normative considerations for architectural preservation. This thesis situates itself in the experimental preservationist’s concern with the current intellectual frames used to assess the value of contemporary objects, as conventional criteria, such as “historical significance,” date back to the late 19th century. Experimental preservation aims to challenge and question the conventional notions of cultural heritage preservation by actively choosing to preserve objects that fall outside the official narratives of preservation, in this case specific moments of happiness. This project started with an observation about the inevitable demand for a reconstructed notion of preservation as we move into a period of ever-increasing development and density in the city of Vancouver. In this project, the link between future development increases and public spaces of collective happiness is pushed to the extreme. This project asks how the current methods of preservation will adapt to contemporary notions of development and social understandings and obsessions of happiness.
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Strength scale effect refers to the decreasing of rock strength when specimen size increases. The drop of strength is specific of the rock type and is related to the presence of natural defects. Scale effect has been widely studied in laboratory test and numerical simulations and there is consensus on the importance of upscaled rock strength for excavation design. However, due to lack of data at scale of rock block, is not uncommon that non-upscaled laboratory properties are applied directly for geotechnical assessment. Besides, literature is scarce on practical applications of scaled rock block strength. In this thesis, numerical upscaling of rock strength is performed and used to back analyze a major instability. The study case corresponds to a highly defected and fractured leached rock that participated in a major slope failure of an open pit mine. First, geological and geotechnical characterization of the defected rock is presented. Then, rock strength is numerically upscaled using synthetic rock numerical samples. Finally, the upscaled rock strength is applied to estimate rock mass strength as input for a bidimensional slope failure back analysis. Synthetic rock experiments were performed in ELFEN FDEM code, on bidimensional samples with diameters between 5 centimeters to 1 meter. A discrete defect network was built in Fracman software based on core logging data. Uniaxial, biaxial and indirect tensile test were performed. The FDEM code was able to simulate realistically cracking patterns and stress-strain curves. The scale effect of the unconfined strength was verified while friction angle showed to be size invariant. The back analysis of slope failure demonstrated that the confined strength was overestimated, likely due to the lack of constraint that the third dimension impose. The bidimensional back analysis of the slope instability was performed in ELFEN FDEM code and RS2 continuum code. A discrete fracture network of faults was included in ELFEN analysis. Assessments applying upscaled and non-upscaled properties were compared. There was small difference between the two cases due to the larger influence of the joints regarding the upscaled rock strength. However, the case based on upscaled properties reproduced the failure more accurately in both, FDEM and continuum code.
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