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  • In October 2013, the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation (PIRE), in partnership with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kentuckiana (BBBS-KY), was funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) to implement a mentoring research best practices project that explored whether three types of parent/guardian level variables (psychosocial parent/family characteristics, parent engagement in the mentoring match, and parenting style) influence match quality, match length, and youth outcomes. This study was designed to describe these factors, as well as investigate how these factors impact match length, match strength, and youth program outcomes. Data to inform both objectives was collected using a longitudinal multimode approach with youth, mentors and parents in the BBBS-KY program in the metro Louisville area. In addition, data from 16 local school districts provided measures of academic performance, school attendance, and disciplinary suspensions. Data were collected at multiple time points from youth, volunteer mentors, and parents/guardians. These data included BBBS-America standard surveys (Youth Outcomes Survey, and Volunteer and Youth Strength of Relationship Surveys). PIRE supplemented the standard BBBS data collection efforts with project-specific baseline volunteer mentor survey and several formative and outcome based inserts to supplement the data that was regularly collected from youth and mentors. The PIRE and BBBS-KY teams also created a project-specific parent/guardian survey to better understand the impact of parental factors on match dynamics and youth mentoring program outcomes. Due to low literacy levels of parents/guardians, this survey was administered as a mixed-mode, audio-computer assisted interview (ACASI). Additional data sources for this study included data from (a) coding of qualitative case review notes for selected aspects of matches by BBBS-KY match support specialists, (b) academic data collected from school districts, and (c) data collected on general match characteristics (e.g., match closure status) collected by BBBS-KY as part of their standard business operations. Most measures were collected early in the match (either match formation or three months into the match) and at 12 months into the match.
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Dataset
  • In 2015, the Administration for Children and Families funded a new study - the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Study (MSHS Study) - to focus on MSHS programs and the families they serve. The MSHS Study was designed to closely match the characteristics of the whole population of MSHS programs, centers, families, and children across the United States (a "nationally representative study"). Since the last nationally representative study of MSHS was conducted almost 20 years ago, this study provided an update on MSHS programs and centers, as well as the migrant and seasonal farmworker families they serve. The MSHS Study included data from programs and centers (collected from surveys of program and center directors), classrooms (collected through classroom observations and from surveys of teachers and assistant teachers), families (collected from interviews with parents), and children (collected from direct assessments, assessor ratings, and parent and teacher ratings of children). Although the study gathered a range of program, practice, and family information, a central theme of the data collection focused on language practice and the language skills and abilities of the children served. The study examined the following research questions: What are the characteristics of MSHS programs, centers, staff, families, and children? What services does MSHS provide, and what are the instructional practices and general classroom quality of MSHS classrooms? What are the associations between MSHS characteristics and child/family well-being? The MSHS Study methodology, sample, and measures were all developed (or selected) in collaboration with MSHS stakeholders and experts in MSHS programs and early childhood research. The study was conducted by Abt Associates and its partners - the Catholic University of America and Westat - under contract to the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This collection is organized into 18 data parts: 4 files with data from MSHS staff surveys, including surveys with program directors (DS2), center directors (DS4), teachers (DS7), and assistant teachers (DS8). All staff surveys collected information on the respondent's background and experience and then focused on questions relevant to each respondent. For example, the Program Director Survey collected information on issues such as enrollment, program policies, and approaches to hiring, communication, and supervision. The Center Director Survey focused on characteristics of the center, such as staffing, enrollment, family engagement, and instructional practices. The Teacher and Assistant Teacher Surveys gathered information on topics at the classroom level, such as classroom composition and language(s) of instruction, and also included the 12-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. 1 file with data from classroom observations (DS6), including items from the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) Pre-K, Early Language and Literacy Classroom Observation-Dual Language Learners (ELLCO-DLL), and the MSHS Cultural Items and Language Use (CILU) Checklist. 5 direct child assessments, including height and weight measurements (DS10), the Leiter-3 Examiner Rating Scale (DS11), the Preschool Language Scales Fifth Edition (PLS-5) - English (DS12), the PLS-5 - Bilingual (DS13), and the Woodcock Muñoz Language Survey (DS14). 1 file with data from the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (DS15) completed by teachers for infants and young children to assess children's nonverbal and verbal communication skills. 1 file for Teacher Report of Child (DS16), including data from children's language dominance and proficiency, questions about delays and disabilities, the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory (CDI-English)/Inventario del Desarrollo de Habilidades Comunicativas (IDHC-Spanish), Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS)-Birth Cohort questions on counting in English and Spanish, and ECLS-Kindergarten Approaches to Learning. 1 file for Parent Report of Child (DS17), including data from the MacArthur-Bates CDI-English/IDHC-Spanish, Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment, and the ECLS-B Socioemotional Scale. 1 file with data from the Parent Interview (DS18) that focused on characteristics of the household and focal child. The interview also included items from the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Migrant Farmworker Stress Inventory. 4 survey control files, which include the disposition code for each sampled program (DS1), center (DS3), classroom (DS5), and child/parent (DS9), as well as the base sampling weights and some additional sample information. Various demographic information, such as age, sex, marital status, race, and ethnicity, is also included in the data.
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Dataset
  • In April 2006, Massachusetts passed a comprehensive health care reform bill entitled An Act Providing Access To Affordable, Quality, Accountable Health Care (Chapter 58 of the Acts of 2006), that sought to move the state to near universal coverage. In order to track the impacts of Chapter 58, the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Foundation began funding an annual telephone survey of nonelderly adults in the Commonwealth in fall 2006, just prior to the implementation of key elements of the law. That survey, called the Massachusetts Health Reform Survey (MHRS), was fielded in the fall of 2006-2010, 2012, 2013, 2015, and 2018. This data collection comprises data from the 2018 round of the Massachusetts Health Reform Survey (MHRS). Topics covered by the survey include health insurance status; specific types of health insurance coverage held by the survey respondents; insurance premiums and covered services for those with insurance; access to and use of health care; out-of-pocket health care costs and medical debt; health and disability status; mental health and substance use disorders. Demographic variables include income, race, and employment status.
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Dataset
  • This study examined the evolution of exposure to violence and psychological distress among adolescents using a sample of 1,354 male and female youths who completed a baseline assessment and 10 follow-up interviews over a seven-year period as part of the Pathways to Desistence study. Statistical analyses were utilized to identify a taxonomy based on adolescents' patterns of exposure to violence as well as to explore the association between the analytically-identified exposure to violence patterns and various psychological symptoms. Additional models were analyzed to examine changes in exposure to violence over time, changes in psychological distress over time, the contemporaneous, parallel processes of changes in exposure to violence and psychological distress over time, and differences in the evolution of violence exposure and psychological distress across sex and race/ethnicity.
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Dataset
  • The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) Series, previously called the National Crime Surveys (NCS), has been collecting data on personal and household victimization through an ongoing survey of a nationally-representative sample of residential addresses since 1973. The NCVS was designed with four primary objectives: (1) to develop detailed information about the victims and consequences of crime, (2) to estimate the number and types of crimes not reported to the police, (3) to provide uniform measures of selected types of crimes, and (4) to permit comparisons over time and types of areas. The survey categorizes crimes as "personal" or "property." Personal crimes include rape and sexual attack, robbery, aggravated and simple assault, and purse-snatching/pocket-picking, while property crimes include burglary, theft, motor vehicle theft, and vandalism. Each respondent is asked a series of screen questions designed to determine whether she or he was victimized during the six-month period preceding the first day of the month of the interview. A "household respondent" is also asked to report on crimes against the household as a whole (e.g., burglary, motor vehicle theft). The data include type of crime, month, time, and location of the crime, relationship between victim and offender, characteristics of the offender, self-protective actions taken by the victim during the incident and results of those actions, consequences of the victimization, type of property lost, whether the crime was reported to police and reasons for reporting or not reporting, and offender use of weapons, drugs, and alcohol. Basic demographic information such as age, race, gender, and income is also collected, to enable analysis of crime by various subpopulations. This version of the NCVS, referred to as the collection year, contains records from interviews conducted in the 12 months of the given year. This dataset represents the revised version of the NCVS on a collection year basis for 2016. A collection year contains records from interviews conducted in the 12 months of the given year. Under the collection year format, victimizations are counted in the year the interview is conducted, regardless of the year when the crime incident occurred. The 2016 National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) violent and property crime estimates were significantly higher than 2015, but it was not possible to determine the degree to which the change in rates resulted from the sample redesign rather than real changes in U.S. victimization levels. Therefore, the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) examined the 2015 and 2016 victimization rates separately for new and continuing sample counties in the 2016 Criminal Victimization bulletin. The BJS requested that the Census Bureau create a 2016 revised file with outgoing county interviews from July-December 2015, continuing county interviews from January-June 2016, and all interviews (continuing and new counties) from July-December 2016. In other words, the outgoing 2015 cases replaced the new 2016 cases in the first half of 2016. The files in this study serve as a separate research file to allow data users to make comparisons between 2015, 2016, and 2017 NCVS estimates using a nationally representative sample. It provides a sample that still represents the entire country but does not have the inflated crime rates seen in the new counties in 2016.
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Dataset
  • This survey was conducted as part of the evaluation of the Aligning Forces for Quality (AF4Q) initiative, which is the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's effort to lift the overall quality of health care in 17 targeted communities, reduce racial and ethnic disparities, and provide models of national reform. The survey was administered to adults with one or more of five chronic illnesses, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, asthma and depression, in the AF4Q communities and a national sample residing in non-AF4Q communities to provide a basis for comparison between the AF4Q communities and the rest of the United States. Survey questions focused on patient activation; consumer knowledge of publicly available performance reports that highlight quality differences among physicians, hospitals, and health plans; the ability to be an effective consumer in the context of a physician visit; patient knowledge about her/his illness; skills and willingness to self-manage one's illness; the impact of insurance and payment models; and the relationship between out-of-pocket costs and health care utilization. In 2011 the AF4Q evaluation team contracted with RTI International (RTI) to conduct the Aligning Forces for Quality Consumer Survey 2.0 (AF4Q 2.0).
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Dataset
  • The Annual Survey of Jails (ASJ) is the only data collection effort that provides an annual source of data on local jails and jail inmates. Data on the size of the jail population and selected inmate characteristics are obtained every five to six years from the Census of Jails. In each of the years between the complete censuses, a sample survey of jails is conducted to estimate baseline characteristics of the nation's jails and inmates housed in these jails. The 2017 Annual Survey of Jails is the 30th such survey in a series begun in 1982. The ASJ supplies data on characteristics of jails such as admissions and releases, growth in the number of jail facilities, changes in their rated capacities and level of occupancy, growth in the population supervised in the community, changes in methods of community supervision, and crowding issues. The ASJ also provides information on changes in the demographics of the jail population, supervision status of persons held, and a count of non-U.S. citizens in custody. The data presented in this study were collected in the Annual Survey of Jails, 2017. These data are used to track growth in the number of jails and the capacities nationally, changes in the demographics of the jail population and supervision status of persons held, the prevalence of crowding issues, and a count of non-U.S. citizens within the jail population. The data are intended for a variety of users, including Federal and State agencies, local officials in conjunction with jail administrators, researchers, planners, and the public. The reference date for the survey is June 30, 2017.
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Dataset
  • The Chicago Community Networks (CCN) study gathered information about characteristics of over 300 organizations in nine Chicago neighborhoods. The CCN surveys also profiled the interactions between organizations and the strength of their relationships.
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Dataset
  • The Pittsburgh Youth Study (PYS) is part of the larger "Program of Research on the Causes and Correlates of Delinquency" initiated by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention in 1986. PYS aims to document the development of antisocial and delinquent behavior from childhood to early adulthood, the risk factors that impinge on that development, and help seeking and service provision of boys' behavior problems. The study also focuses on boys' development of alcohol and drug use, and internalizing problems. PYS consists of three cohorts of boys who were in the first, fourth, and seventh grades in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania public schools during the 1987-1988 academic year (called the youngest, middle, and oldest cohorts, respectively). Using a screening risk score that measured each boy's antisocial behavior, boys identified at the top 30 percent within each grade cohort on the screening risk measure (n=~250), as well as an equal number of boys randomly selected from the remainder (n=~250), were selected for follow-up. Consequently, the final sample for the study consisted of 1,517 total students selected for follow-up. 506 of these students were in the oldest sample, 508 were in the middle sample, and 503 were in the youngest sample. Assessments were conducted semiannually and then annually using multiple informants (i.e., boys, parents, and teachers) between 1987 and 2010. The youngest cohort was assessed from ages 6-19 and again at ages 25 and 28. The middle cohort was assessed from ages 9-13 and again at age 23. The oldest cohort was assessed from ages 13-25, with an additional assessment at age 35. Information has been collected on a broad range of risk and protective factors across multiple domains (e.g., individual, family, peer, school, and neighborhood). Measures of conduct problems, substance use/abuse, criminal behavior, mental health problems have been collected. This collection contains data and syntax files for demographic constructs. The datasets include constructs on repeated grade status, demographic information of participants, participants' biological mother, biological father, female caretaker, and male caretaker, change of caretaker since last phase, number of family members and other adults or children in the home, family structure, followup participation by youth, caretaker, and teacher, and housing characteristics. The demographic constructs were created by using the PYS raw data. The raw data are available at ICPSR in the following studies: Pittsburgh Youth Study Youngest Sample (1987 - 2001) [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania], Pittsburgh Youth Study Middle Sample (1987 - 1991) [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania], and Pittsburgh Youth Study Oldest Sample (1987 - 2000) [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania].
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Dataset
  • The Pittsburgh Youth Study (PYS) is part of the larger "Program of Research on the Causes and Correlates of Delinquency" initiated by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention in 1986. PYS aims to document the development of antisocial and delinquent behavior from childhood to early adulthood, the risk factors that impinge on that development, and help seeking and service provision of boys' behavior problems. The study also focuses on boys' development of alcohol and drug use, and internalizing problems. PYS consists of three cohorts of boys who were in the first, fourth, and seventh grades in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania public schools during the 1987-1988 academic year (called the youngest, middle, and oldest cohorts, respectively). Using a screening risk score that measured each boy's antisocial behavior, boys identified at the top 30% within each grade cohort on the screening risk measure (n=~250), as well as an equal number of boys randomly selected from the remainder (n=~250), were selected for follow-up. Consequently, the final sample for the study consisted of 1,517 total students selected for follow-up. 503 of these students were in the oldest sample, 508 were in the middle sample, and 506 were in the youngest sample. Assessments were conducted semiannually and then annually using multiple informants (i.e., boys, parents, and teachers) between 1987 and 2010. The youngest cohort was assessed from ages 6-19 and again at ages 25 and 28. The middle cohort was assessed from ages 9-13 and again at age 23. The oldest cohort was assessed from ages 13-25, with an additional assessment at age 35. Information has been collected on a broad range of risk and protective factors across multiple domains (e.g., individual, family, peer, school, and neighborhood). Measures of conduct problems, substance use/abuse, criminal behavior, mental health problems have been collected. This collection contains data and syntax files for mental health constructs. The datasets include constructs on symptoms and contributing factors from both the DSM-IIIR and DSM-IV for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Anxiety, Conduct Disorder, depressed mood, substance abuse, Major Depressive Episode and Dysthymia, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Psychopathy with and without delinquency, Schizophrenia, help-seeking behavior, institutionalization, and other diagnoses and constructs. Additionally, the collection includes data on scores from the following scales: Problem Scale, DSM-Oriented Scale, Child Behavior Checklist (CBPRB), and Young Adult Problem Scales. The mental health constructs were created by using the PYS raw data. The raw data are available at ICPSR in the following studies: Pittsburgh Youth Study Youngest Sample (1987 - 2001) [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania], Pittsburgh Youth Study Middle Sample (1987 - 1991) [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania], and Pittsburgh Youth Study Oldest Sample (1987 - 2000) [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania].
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Dataset
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