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Differentiated care, or differentiated service delivery (DSD), is increasingly being promoted as one of the possible ways to address and improve access, quality, and efficiency of HIV prevention, care, and treatment. Family-centered care has long been promoted within the provision of HIV services, but the full benefits have not necessarily been realized. In this article, we bring together these two approaches and make the case for how family-centered DSD can offer benefits to both people affected by HIV and the health system. Family-centered DSD approaches are presented for HIV testing and antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery, referencing policies, best practice examples, and evidence from the field. With differentiated family-centered ART delivery, the potential efficiencies gained by extending ART refills can both benefit clients by reducing the frequency and intensity of contact with the health service and lead to health system gains by not requiring multiple providers to care for one family. A family-centered DSD approach should also be leveraged along the HIV care cascade in the provision of prevention technologies and mobilizing family members to receive regular HIV testing. Furthermore, a family-centered lens should be applied wherever DSD is implemented to ensure that, for example, adolescents who are pregnant receive an adapted package of quality care.
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The Structured Operational Research and Training Initiative (SORT IT) is a successful model of integrated operational research and capacity building with about 90% of participants completing the training and publishing in scientific journals.
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The number of patients on second-line antiretroviral therapy is growing, but data on HIV drug resistance patterns at failure in resource-constrained settings are scarce. We aimed to describe drug resistance and investigate the factors associated with extensive resistance to nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), in patients failing second-line therapy in the HIV outpatient clinic at Arua Regional Referral Hospital, Uganda.
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Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is hyperendemic in Cameroon, and health care workers (HCWs) are at high-risk of infection. We aimed to assess prevalence, risk factors and vaccine coverage of HBV infection among HCWs in Cameroon. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 16 hospitals across all regions of Cameroon. HCWs were tested for HBV using rapid diagnostic tests (RDT). We collected data on socio-demographics and HBV vaccination status. We estimated prevalence of HBV and used Poisson regression models with robust standard errors to model the prevalence ratios of HBV positivity between covariates. We enrolled 1,824 of 1,836 eligible HCWs (97.5%). The mean age was 34 (SD: 10) years, 65.3% (n=1787) were women, and 11.4% (n=1747) had three or more doses of the HBV vaccine. Overall, we found a HBV prevalence of 8.7% (95% CI: 5.2 - 14.3%). Patient transporters had the highest crude prevalence (14.3%; 95%CI: 5.4-32.9%), whereas medical doctors had the lowest (3.2%; 95%CI: 0.8%-12.1%). The Far North Region had the highest prevalence of HBV (24.0%; 95%CI: 18.3%-30.8%). HBV prevalence decreased with increasing doses of the HBV vaccine (10.3% for no doses vs 3.5% for three or more doses; P<0.001). In conclusion, approximately 1 in 12 HCWs in Cameroon have evidence of HBV infection, yet fewer than 1 in 6 have been fully vaccinated. Our results illustrate the urgent need to scale up systematic HBV screening and targeted vaccination of HCWs in the region. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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Ethiopia has achieved a high coverage of antiretroviral treatment (ART), but maintaining lifelong care is still a great challenge. Mental illnesses often co-exist with HIV/AIDS and may compromise the retention on ART. In order to improve prolonged retention in ART care, basic training in mental health care was introduced for ART providers, but this hasn't been evaluated yet. The aim of this study was to examine if this training has improved patient retention in care.
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Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) make the largest contribution to mortality both globally and in the majority of low- and middle- income countries (LMICs). Worldwide, NCDs account for 60% (35 million) of global deaths. The major NCDs used to be diseases of affluence; however, the changing epidemiology of NCDs (increasingly affecting low- and middle-income countries) and the changing patterns of refugee crises (away from settings where infectious disease represents the main burden of disease) mean that they now represent an increasing proportion of the cases we see in many MSF projects.
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Snakebite envenoming is a frequently overlooked cause of mortality and morbidity. Data for snake ecology and existing snakebite interventions are scarce, limiting accurate burden estimation initiatives. Low global awareness stunts new interventions, adequate health resources, and available health care. Therefore, we aimed to synthesise currently available data to identify the most vulnerable populations at risk of snakebite, and where additional data to manage this global problem are needed.
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Tackling the high non-communicable disease (NCD) burden among Syrian refugees poses a challenge to humanitarian actors and host countries. Current response priorities are the identification and integration of key interventions for NCD care into humanitarian programs as well as sustainable financing. To provide evidence for effective NCD intervention planning, we conducted a cross-sectional survey among non-camp Syrian refugees in northern Jordan to investigate the burden and determinants for high NCDs prevalence and NCD multi-morbidities and assess the access to NCD care.
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An estimated 32,000 children develop multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB; Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to isoniazid and rifampin) each year. Little is known about the optimal treatment for these children.
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