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  • Transparency of research is a large concern in political science, and the practice of publishing links to datasets and other online resources is one of the main methods by which political scientists promote transparency. But the method cannot work if the links don’t, and very often, they don’t. We show that most of the URLs ever published in the American Political Science Review no longer work as intended. The problem is severe in recent as well as in older articles; for example, more than one-fourth of links published in the APSR in 2013 were broken by the end of 2014. We conclude that “reference rot” limits the transparency and reproducibility of political science research. We also describe practices that scholars can adopt to combat the problem: when possible, they should archive data in trustworthy repositories, use links that incorporate persistent digital identifiers, and create archival versions of the webpages to which they link.
    Data Types:
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  • Article abstract: "Recent decades have seen a considerable increase in delegation to independent regulatory agencies, which has been justified by reference to the superior performance of these bodies relative to government departments. Yet, the hypothesis that more independent regulators do better work has hardly been tested. We examine the link using a comprehensive measure of the quality of work carried out by competition authorities in 30 OECD countries, and new data on the design of these organizations. We find that formal independence has a positive and significant effect on quality. Contrary to expectations, though, formal political accountability does not boost regulatory quality, and there is no evidence that it increases the effect of independence by reducing the risk of slacking. The quality of work is also enhanced by increased staffing, more extensive regulatory powers, and spillover effects of a more capable bureaucratic system". Data: This release contains data from the Global Competition Review. This data is made available for non-commercial purposes only.
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Tabular Data
  • Candidates employ strategies that depend on the electorate involved and the opponent(s) they face. In two-stage elections - elections that include both a primary and a general election - candidates must balance the need to satisfy their party's electorate and defeat their primary opponent(s) with the need to appeal to the electorate as a whole in order to defeat their general election opponent. That balance will depend on whether the primary stage is contested or not. We evaluate how candidates in 56 U.S. Senate and gubernatorial campaigns respond to these considerations by analyzing the bundles of issues candidates emphasize in their campaign advertising. As expected, electoral competition leads candidates to emphasize similar issues over the course of their campaigns. As a result, candidates involved in contested primaries adopt a mixed strategy, responding both to their primary election opponents and their eventual general election opponent during the primary-election phase of the contest.
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Document
  • "That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” Shakespeare has Juliet tell her Romeo that a name is just a convention without meaning, what counts is the reference, the 'thing itself', to which the property of smelling sweet pertains alone. Frege in his classical paper “Über Sinn und Bedeutung” was not so sure, he assumed names can be inherently meaningful, even without a known reference. And Wittgenstein later in Philosophical Investigations (PI) seems to deny the sheer arbitrariness of names and reject looking for meaning out of context, by pointing to our inability to just utter some random sounds and by that really implying e.g. the door. The word cannot simply be separated from its meaning, in the same way as the money from the cow that could be bought for them (PI 120). Scientific names of biota, in particular, are often descriptive of properties pertaining to the organism or species itself. On the other hand, in semantic web technology and Linked Open Data (LOD) there is an overall effort to replace names by their references, in the form of web links or Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs). “Things, not strings” is the motto. But, even in view of the many "challenges with using names to link digital biodiversity information" that were extensively described in a recent paper, would it at all be possible or even desirable to replace scientific names of biota with URIs? Or would it be sufficient to just identify equivalence relationships between different variants of names of the same biota, having the same reference, and then just link them to the same “thing”, by means of a property sameAs(URI)? The Global Names Architecture (GNA) has a resolver of scientific names that is already doing that kind of work, linking names of biota such as Pinus thunbergii to global identifiers and URIs from other data sources, such as Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) and uBio Namebank. But there may be other challenges with going from a “natural language”, even from a not entirely coherent system of scientific names, to a semantic web ontology, a solution to some of which have been proposed recently by means of so called 'lexical bridges'.
    Data Types:
    • Slides
  • Data on state supreme court elections covering years starting in 1946 for all states using elections and going back earlier for selected states
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    • Tabular Data
    • Document
  • Subnational poverty headcount ratios were derived from 66 nationally representative household surveys and population census information conducted in various years around 2008 for 26 countries. Our poverty calculations are based on the comparison between the household per-capita consumption expenditure (a synthetic indicator expressing the money-metric welfare utility level) and the $1.90 and $3.10/day poverty lines expressed in international equivalent purchasing power parity (PPP) dollars in 2011. Poverty headcount with standard deviation, gap, severity, and Gini index are also provided.
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    • Software/Code
    • Tabular Data
    • File Set
  • This archive contains high-quality peptide-based unfolding curves as .png files. for the E. coli, S. cerevisiae, T. thermophilus and human proteomes. The archive can be browsed manually or using the attached R application (shiny based). The R-browser can be launched from a command line as follows (more details in the README.txt file): Rscript run.R All files have to be downloaded to use the browser tool flawlessly.
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Text
    • File Set
  • Replication Data for: Does Direct Democracy Increase Communicative Responsiveness? A Field Experiment with Swiss Politicians (2017-1-5)
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Tabular Data
    • Text
    • File Set
  • Replication data for Ross, Michael L., Chad Hazlett, and Paasha Mahdavi, "Global progress and backsliding on gasoline taxes and subsidies," Nature Energy 2, 16201 (2017).
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Tabular Data
    • Document
  • This entry include the PDF of the published papers and the codes used for producing the results and tables for this article. Note that the data used is the CMS Medicare HEDIS data from 2003 to 2012 and 2007 Medicare Enrollment and claims files for the 20% sample. this data is available from CMS through ResDAC (http://www.resdac.org/cms-data/request/research-identifiable-files) and it's not free
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Document
    • Text
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