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Biodegradable starch films can be a great alternative for non-degradable conventional plastic films as packaging materials. Packaging material, besides relevant properties such as mechanical or barrier properties, should also be characterised by a good printability to provide some required information about the product. In this study we show the possibility of printing of starch films. Potato starch films with glycerol as a plasticiser were obtained. The properties of the films were confirmed by tensile strength, water vapour transition rate, and moisture content. Next, the surface free energy of the starch films was determinate by the Owens−Wendt and van Oss–Chaudhury–Good approach. The wettability of the obtained films was investigated by the analysis of water droplet absorption. Finally, the films were overprinted with biodegradable printing ink and optical density and colour parameters were determined. The printing performance was compared with biodegradable commercially available PLA and paper. The print quality of the overprinted starch films is comparable to the PLA and paper, which shows the strong potential of using starch films as a biodegradable, environmentally friendly packaging materials.
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The dataset here proposed is composed of over 190 spectra of single crystal specimens (including gem quality ones) and ornamental stones supplied by the Department of Sciences and Technology of the University of Sannio (Benevento, Italy). Additional organic compounds, such as waxes, resins, proteins, commonly used as protective of geomaterials in Cultural Heritage, are also provided in this contribution. All the samples have been analyzed by means of a Bruker Optics Alpha-R portable FTIR spectrometer with an External Reflectance (ER) head for contactless and non-destructive analyses. For further details refer to the paper titled "External reflectance FTIR dataset (4000 - 400 cm-1) for the identification of relevant mineralogical phases forming Cultural Heritage materials" and authored by Izzo et al.
Data Types:
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Forest fire images for deep learning.
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Data collected for the manuscript 'QEMSCAN as a method of semi-automated crystal size distribution analysis: Insights from Apollo 15 mare basalts'. In this study we investigate the feasibility of using Quantitative Evaluation of Minerals by SCANing electron microscopy (QEMSCAN) for semi-automated crystal size distribution analysis. Presented here are full resolution backscattered electron (BSE) maps, QEMSCAN mineral phase maps and QEMSCAN-derived energy dispersive x-ray (EDS) maps collected as part of this project. Backscattered electron (BSE) maps of each sample were gathered using a FEI QUANTA 650 field emission gun (FEG) scanning electron microscope (SEM) at the University of Manchester. The FEI QEMSCAN at the University of Manchester operates using the same QUANTA 650 FEG SEM, equipped with a single Bruker XFlash energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), at an accelerating voltage of 25 kV and a 10 nA beam current. This set-up was used to collect QEMSCAN data in field scan mode, which produces full images of each field of the sample block, giving both qualitative major element chemical maps and a mineral phase map of the full thin section. Mineral phase maps of each sample were acquired using step sizes (i.e. pixel sizes) of 5, 10 and 20 microns (referred to as Q5, Q10 and Q20). The EDS maps were produced using the 5 micron step-size QEMSCAN field scans for each sample. The data are divided into folders based on sample thin section number.
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The single line diagrams of the three cases and all the test data employed in the present work.
Data Types:
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Techno Stress and Coping Strategies
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Wss1 promotes replication stress tolerance Wss1 catalytic activity is essential for replication stress tolerance Histone accumulation is toxic to wss1 mutant cells during replication stress Wss1 targets histones bound to single-strand DNA during replication stress
Data Types:
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  • Document
Four differentially expressed gene in keloid tissues The upstream regulatory analysis investigated the fold change in mRNA levels of four gene expression in the keloid group in comparison to normal part.
Data Types:
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The present data article aims to provide the whole dataset obtained during an experiment of updating laser scan point clouds with photogrammetry meshes. It was investigated whether photos from smartphones are also appropriate for updating point clouds by using photogrammetry in a factory environment. The photos (369) taken in 08:30 min with the smartphone were taken with the App 645 PRO Mk III with the settings ISO 250, F-Stop 1.8, Shutterspeed 1/125 sec. The result was that photos from current smartphones (here tested: iPhone XS) are suitable for photogrammetry applications. Main component are the comparison of the datasets of three devices: Nikon D810 with Sigma art 24mm, iPhone 6 and iPhone XS. In this repository one dataset (photos in .TIFF) of the iPhone XS is provided. The test environment was a technical room in a factory. The data sets are used for a photogrammetry comparison. Furthermore, all settings in the RealityCapture BETA 1.0 and Meshroom 2019 2.0 software are provided. A comparison of calculation time and quality of the 3D meshes was performed. The data set of the iPhone XS can be used to compare further photogrammetry software or single algorithms. Besides the images, the point clouds of the laser scanner are provided. This also includes the combination of laser scan point cloud and photogrammetry mesh. This data in brief article is published as an co-submission of the paper "Approach for an Update Method for Digital Factory Models" in the Procedia CIRP CMS 2020. Conclusions and further information can be found in this paper.
Data Types:
  • Software/Code
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Supplemental figure 1. Clinical variants of morphea: (A) plaque type on the upper back (B) linear (en coup de sabre) type (C) linear type with blaschkoid distribution (D) deep type accompanied with muscle atrophy (E) generalized type which showed isomorphic plaques covering the entire trunk. Supplemental figure 2. The three patterns of sclerosis in morphea: (A) Top-heavy pattern; moderate to severe sclerosis in the papillary to the superficial reticular dermis, while below the mid dermis is relatively spared. (B) Bottom-heavy pattern; moderate to severe sclerosis below the mid dermis, while papillary to the superficial reticular dermis is relatively spared. (C) Full-thickness pattern; moderate to severe sclerosis throughout the whole dermis. (Hematoxylin-eosin stain: x40.) Supplemental figure 3. Histopathological features associated with poor treatment response: (A) Severe degree of sclerosis, which showed extensive fibrosis into the deep dermis and subcutis. (B) Dense inflammatory infiltrates at the dermal-subcutaneous junction and adjacent fat tissue. (C) Presence of tissue eosinophils. (D) Prominent basal layer hyperpigmentation. (Hematoxylin-eosin stain: A, B and D x100; C x200.)
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