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  • This R-Project and its data files are provided in support of ongoing research efforts for forecasting COVID-19 cumulative case growth at varied geographic granularities. All of the code and data files are provided to facilitate reproducibility of current research findings. Seven forecasting methods are evaluated with respect to their effectiveness at forecasting one-, three-, and seven-day cumulative COVID-19 cases, including: (1) a Naive approach; (2) Holt-Winters exponential smoothing; (3) growth rate; (4) moving average (MA); (5) autoregressive (AR); (6) autoregressive moving average (ARMA); and (7) autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA). This package is developed to be directly opened and run in RStudio by opening the provided R Project file. This code was developed using R version 3.6.3. This software generates the findings of the submitted article entitled "Short-range forecasting of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) during early onset at various levels of geographic granularity using seven different methods" using cumulative case counts reported by The New York Times up to April 22, 2020. This package provides two avenues for reproducing results: 1) Regenerate the forecasts from scratch using the provided code and data files and then run the analyses; or 2) Load the saved forecast data and run the analyses on the existing data License info can be viewed from the "License Info.txt" file. The "RProject" folder contains the RProject file which opens the project in RStudio with the desired working directory set. README files are contained in each sub-folder which provide additoinal detail on the contents of the folder. Copyright (c) 2020 Christopher J. Lynch and Ross Gore Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions: The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software. THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE. Except as contained in this notice, the name(s) of the above copyright holders shall not be used in advertising or otherwise to promote the sale, use, or other dealings in this Software without prior written authorization.
    Data Types:
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    • Software/Code
    • Image
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
    • Document
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  • The delivery of healthcare including the provision of pharmacy services globally is highly regulated internationally in order to protect public health and welfare. However, the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic has precipitated the need internationally to amend the model of regulation in order to ensure that people were able to continue to access a range of healthcare services in a timely and effective manner. Many of the changes introduced to the regulation of pharmacy services in Ireland have been replicated in other countries including the introduction of electronic means to transmit prescriptions and other orders for medications, relaxing the legal restrictions in place controlling the emergency supply of prescription only medicines and more fully utilizing the professional competency of pharmacists by empowering them to use their expertise and judgment to support their patients accessing the healthcare services that they need. Many of the regulatory changes that have been introduced to support the COVID-19 public health emergency effort are ones that pharmacists have previously sought to enable them provide a more effective and expanded model of pharmaceutical care to their patients. Accordingly, many pharmacists will want these regulatory changes to be retained and further expanded in the aftermath of the COVID-19 public health emergency in order to extend their scope of practice and support them in the care of their patients
    Data Types:
    • Dataset
    • Document
  • Two progeny trials were set up in December 2014 in the city of Aracruz, ES, Brazil, one of Corymbia maculata and the other of Corymbia torelliana. These trials were replicated in the city of Três Lagoas, MS, Brazil. The four trials were measured at 29 months of age. An incomplete block design (all treatments do not occur within the same block) was chosen to evaluete diameter at breast height and Height of 64 half-sib progenies of Corymbia maculata and 65 half-sib progenies of Corymbia torelliana.
    Data Types:
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  • U.S. Energy Information Administration data - the published time series of spot prices of gasoline and diesel: in New York Harbor, in port cities along the coastline of Texas and Louisiana (U.S. Gulf) and in port cities in southern California (Los Angeles). While in New York Harbor and in the U.S. Gulf, conventional regular gasoline spot prices are published, in Los Angeles, RBOB regular gasoline prices are published.
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
    • Document
  • The supra-aortic trunks and the most critical visceral branches of the abdominal aorta (celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery, and renal arteries) are responsible for the blood supply to the head, neck, superior limbs, and abdominal viscera. The atherosclerotic degeneration of those vessels or branches could eventually lead to a significant decrease in the blood flow to vital structures. That is the main reason why those arteries are currently common sites of endovascular manipulation. The knowledge about the resistance of these vessels' walls and their compliance is beneficial for the doctors who manipulate them and the industries that produce endovascular devices. The present dataset is a collection of uniaxial biomechanical tests from arteries harvested during the autopsy procedure of 27 adult donors. Samples from the brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery1, left subclavian artery, celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery, and renal arteries were collected for analysis whenever it was possible. A 2 cm long segment of each artery was collected and longitudinally opened to produce a flat tissue sample. Like the standardization used for aorta fragments previously published in literature2, the uniaxial tensile test utilized the INSTRON SPEC 2200 device and was coordinated by INSPEC software and SERIES IX software. The essential variables studied through this test are failure stress, failure tension, and failure strain. Each sample test generated a graph representing the relationship between stress and strain (elastic diagram). Notable findings: Although much smaller and seaming much more delicate than the aorta itself, some of its branches showed values of stress and tension higher than the ones observed in aorta fragments previously published in the literature by Monteiro and Nynomiya.3,4 DATA DESCRIPTION: Biomechanical Data: For each valid sample test, three documents were generated: 1. Stress X strain graph (all graphs contain a notification in their left upper corner about each sample's failure stress, strain (also called ultimate yield in the charts), and tension). 2. Table (excel file containing all the values related to the stress X strain graph) 3. A report from the Biomechanical test software containing details of the test All files related to valid biomechanical tests from these 27 cadaveric donors' arteries were included in the present dataset. Unfortunately, some of the tensile tests were not considered valid as the samples slipped from the biomechanical test equipment clips. Therefore, only valid tests are present in this dataset.
    Data Types:
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    • Tabular Data
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  • Supplemental Table E-4
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    • Dataset
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  • 1) 2013_31cases_pdf (935 KB) This file presents the list of 31 Sakurajima volcanic eruptions in 2013 selected for analysis (Table 1) and images of temporally accumulated reflectivity factors for the 31 volcanic eruption clouds (Fig.1). In all cases, the eruption cloud height was ≥3000 m above the vent. 2) 2013_31cases_mp4.zip (288MB) The folder “2013_31cases_mp4” contains 31 animation files. Each file name is constructed as caseXX.mp4, where XX is the case number from 01 to 31. In each file, animated Plan Position Indicator (PPI) images of polarimetric radar parameters such as reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), correlation coefficient (RHV), and Doppler velocity (VEL) for an elevation angle of 6° are shown. The accumulated reflectivity [mm6 m–3] of each eruption is also shown. Web camera images of volcanic ash clouds were provided by Minami Nihon Shinbun. X-band polarimetric radar data were provided by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT). 3) 3D_animation_mp4.zip The folder “3D_animation_mp4” contains the following five animation files which helps to understand the results shown in the article “Analyses of three-dimensional weather radar data from volcanic eruption clouds”
    Data Types:
    • Video
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  • Our results in the article were based on the data showed in these three supplementary tables.
    Data Types:
    • Dataset
    • Document
  • One of the greatest challenges in volcanology is extracting information from volcanic deposits that inform the conditions at the time of emplacement. Here we explore particle shape-fabric within samples from the column-collapse pyroclastic density current (PDC) deposits generated by the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mt. Saint Helens (MSH). Particle shape-fabric is the mutual alignment of particles within the samples, which is dependent of shearing conditions at the time of deposition. Here, particle shape-fabric is used to address the following hypotheses: (1) particle shape-fabric will align with previous interpretations of PDC flow direction during the 1980 event; (2) samples extracted from PDC deposits immediately above a basal contact will show higher extents of fabric development (i.e. clast alignment) relative to samples extracted well above the contact; and (3) samples extracted from the proximal bedded deposits, located on the steep flanks of the volcano, will have higher extents of fabric development relative to samples extracted from the massive facies found in the gently dipping pumice plain. We find that fabric orientations approximate previous flow direction interpretations well for massive PDC deposits, validating the method of using particle-shape fabric to determine flow direction. However, while samples extracted immediately above the PDC deposit-substrate contact do not show a higher measure of clast alignment relative to samples taken well above flow contacts, the typical clast bimodality suggests some degree of traction transport and thus higher shearing conditions relative to when the currents deposited massive lapilli tuffs. Samples extracted from the proximal bedded deposits do not show higher extents of fabric development relative to the massive deposits, supporting previous interpretations that these deposits formed from a rapidly sedimenting, concentrated flow boundary zone that was thin enough to be frequently interrupted or influenced by the overriding turbulent portion of the flow. Finally, observations of fine scale variability in measured fabric within a single outcrop indicates unsteady flow conditions and step-wise aggradation during deposition. This work demonstrates that particle shape-fabric analyses can aid in decoding PDC flow conditions, and future, complementary experimental work may allow for the extraction of quantitative information regarding the magnitudes of shear within the lower flow boundary zone of PDCs.
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
    • Document
  • The study area concerning the data set is located between the 31˚36′1″ N, 78˚26′ 47″ E and 31˚27′10″ N, 77˚38′ 20″ E in Satluj River valley, NW Himalaya. This region has been subjected to spatio-temporal varying tectonic stress, owing to continent-continent collision orogeny, resulting in a diverse set of joints. This data is a part of a larger dataset that was compiled to infer potential landslide damming in Satluj valley, NW Himalaya. The data set includes joint mapping data and values of input parameters that are used in the Finite Element Method based slope stability evaluation. Rock mass joint data was collected in the field. Rock/soil samples, collected from each landslide, were analysed in the National Geotechnical Facility and Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, India. These values were used in models to evaluate slope stability of different types of landslides. Procedure described in the relevant Indian Standard (IS) codes was followed for the laboratory analyses. Such data set can be utilized to infer the pattern of rock mass joints in continent-continent collision orogeny on regional scale. At slope level, it can be inferred as a controlling parameter. The values of input parameters used in the FEM models can be utilized as a reference for different types of rock mass and soil.
    Data Types:
    • Dataset
    • Document
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