Demo Uni

The Griffindale University research beacons are examples of pioneering discoveries, interdisciplinary collaboration and cross-sector partnerships that are tackling some of the biggest questions facing the planet.

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  • -> The Human Disease Author Aid Collection combines information about rare and common diseases in standardized, easy-to-navigate overviews and tables. -> The Author Aid Collection includes clinical, molecular, and pharmacological data from several Elsevier and public sources. -> Author Aid Templates can be a helpful guide for authors, researchers, clinicians, and students, especially those interested in rare diseases, because they highlight the latest updates, findings, and basic disease information from several sources on one page. Contents -> The Human Disease Author Aid Collection is published in parts with 5-10 diseases grouped by therapeutic areas, except Part 1. Tables are planned to be updated with the latest metadata and citations quarterly. -> Part 1 includes opening examples for common and rare human diseases: hemophilia, phenylketonuria, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, migraine, and COVID-19. -> Each disease template overview in Part 1 includes six sections: Terminology; Epidemiology/Demographics; Clinical presentation/Diagnosis; Etiology/Pathology (genetics, biomarkers, pathways); Treatment/Follow-Up; and Case studies. Each subset of data is linked to a list of publications with relevant citations.
    Data Types:
    • Image
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
    • Document
  • A collection of open datasets created by different groups across Elsevier in collaboration with our research collaboration partners. In line with FAIR data practices, these data are openly shared to foster research and promote reproducibility. Our current research in data science spans natural language processing, fact extraction and entity identification. We also have projects studying research itself through the lenses of gender, researcher mobility, FAIR data use, peer review and the impact of sustainable development goals.
    Data Types:
    • Collection
  • The data set represent the wear depth as a function of time and applied normal loads during the dry reciprocating sliding of Ti-Ni binary alloy against alloy steel counterface.
    Data Types:
    • Dataset
    • Document
  • This is a dataset of citation contexts for citations of Noble Prize winning papers from 1995-2017. Citation contexts are from papers published by Elsevier that have full-text XML. The dataset lists the Scopus ID and Science Direct ID (SDID) of papers citing the original prize winning papers linked to the prize winners themselves. The nobel prize winning paper's Scopus ID is also listed. For each citing paper, we include: - the sentence in which the Nobel Prize paper was cited; - the section heading of the citing paper in which the sentence occurred; - the year of the citing paper. Using the Scopus identifier full metadata can be retrieved.
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
  • Complete ICP-MS REE and trace elements data set from Actlabs Canada. Samples of carbonates leached with 5% AA for 24h at room temperature
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
  • The Elsevier DataSearch (https://datasearch.elsevier.com) team participated in the bioCADDIE 2016 Dataset Retrieval Challenge. The results of the Challenge, along with the example and test queries, can be found here: https://biocaddie.org/biocaddie-2016-dataset-retrieval-challenge We have submitted a paper to DATABASE: The Journal of Biological Databases and Curation that details our work in the Challenge (to be published in the latter half of 2017). The attached file, elsevier-submission.zip, contains elsevier[1-5].txt, which correspond to the five-run submissions as described in the paper. The following describes the code that we developed for the Challenge: Aspire Content Processing by Search Technologies (https://www.searchtechnologies.com/en-gb/aspire): Dictionary.xml - Loads dictionaries (MeSH, Genes, Solr fields) into Aspire so that they can be used to identify concepts in text (document or query). QueryAnalyzer.xml - Receives a query, identifies concepts using the dictionaries and returns a response containing information about the concepts in the query. ProcessJSON.xml - Processes the JSON documents (Flattens the metadata; Identifies MeSH and Gene concepts and embeds them in the text; Prepares the document to be indexed by Solr). ProcessJSONSimple.xml - Enables JSON documents which have previously been created by ProcessJosn.xml to be sent to Solr without any further processing. This is much quicker than having to run ProcessJSONSimple.xml again; Prepares the document to be indexed by Solr. All other aspects of Aspire (Aspire framework, content source to process a folder of JSON files, submission to Solr) are standard Aspire features with no customisation. Solr: Biocaddie.qpl - QPL file for processing a search query by sending a request to QueryAnalyzer.xml in Aspire, parsing the response and constructing a Lucene query. Elsevier-solr.zip - Java project for a custom Solr Token Filter to index concept IDs in the same position as the words to which they relate. All other aspects of Solr are standard Solr or QPL.. Dictionary Creation: MeSH.groovy - Groovy script to convert a MeSH dictionary in ASCII format into a dictionary which can be used in Aspire. Genes.groovy - Groovy script to convert a Gene dictionary into a dictionary which can be used in Aspire. The file biocaddie-infosys-master_files.zip contains the following: SolrQueryGen - Generates Solr queries from text. It supports unigram, gazetteer lookup, lemmatisation and word embedding expansion. JudgementUI - UI for bioCADDIE manual judgments. Additional utilities: NLP4J - Natural language parsing (tokenisation, lemmatisation, part of speech tagging, etc.). PseudoRelevanceFeedback - Another approach, but not integrated. BioCaddieSpark – Apache Spark jobs to load data and process, index into Solr. BioCaddieServices - Backend services for Judgment UI. Any questions about the code should be directed to datasearch-support@elsevier.com.
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Dataset
    • Document
    • File Set
  • Abstraction of study quality, baseline data and results. Meta-analyses and GRADE profile.
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
  • In this study, we review six morphologically similar species of Sesamia Guenée, 1852 from Africa, including three new species that are described: Sesamia corymbosus Le Ru n. sp., S. schoenoplectus Le Ru n. sp. and S. temberma Le Ru n. sp. These six species belong to a species complex that we hereby define as the Sesamia coniota group. Host plants of four species are recorded: Schoenoplectus corymbosus (Roth ex Roem. & Schult.) J. Raynal. for S. corymbosus and S. schoenoplectus, Echinochloa pyramidalis (Lam.) Hitschc. & Chase, Eriochloa meyeriana (Nees) Pilg., Schoenoplectus corymbosus and Typha latifolia L. for S. jansei, Tams & Bowden, 1953 and Pennisetum sp. for S. temberma. We also conduct molecular phylogenetic analyses on a multimarker (four mitochondrial and two nuclear genes) molecular dataset encompassing 36 specimens (including 32 specimens belonging to the S. coniota group). Molecular analyses allow assessing the phylogenetic relationships of five out of six species of the group.
    Data Types:
    • Dataset
  • Riparian zones are important for the maintenance of aquatic ecosystem functional integrity, yet are considered to be particularly vulnerable to plant invasions. The role of terrestrial riparian plant invasions in compromising aquatic ecosystem processes is, however, still poorly understood. This issue is particularly relevant for temporary rivers, which are understudied compared to permanent river systems, despite their ubiquity and largescale contributions to biogeochemical processes. Here we experimentally assessed leaf litter breakdown dynamics in situ in a temporary river in arid southeastern Botswana, Southern Africa. We contrasted aquatic leaching and microbial and invertebrate litter breakdown contributions to the native leadwood Combretum imberbe and invasive river red gum Eucalyptus camaldulensis in the Lotsane River. Fine-mesh (detritivore exclusion) and coarse-mesh (detritivore inclusion) bags were separately filled with leaf litter from each species and deployed in the river during a hydroperiod (wet phase), with decomposition measured over a 6-week period. E. camaldulensis shed significantly more leachate than the native C. imberbe. Significantly more microbial and detritivore breakdown was, however, observed in native than in invasive leaf litter. Overall, invertebrates contributed little to biological leaf litter breakdown processes compared to microbial breakdown contributions. Although significantly higher in native leaves, low invertebrate numbers were found in leaf litter in the study. This study highlights the role of microbial contributions to detrital decay in temporary arid zone rivers, whereas invertebrate contributions were relatively minor. The study further contributes to our understanding of how invasive riparian plant species alter aquatic detrital pool dynamics in invaded temporary wetland ecosystems.
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • Basal and plasticity of thermal tolerance determine abundance, biogeographical patterns and activity of insects over spatial and temporal scales. For coexisting stemborer parasitoids, offering synergistic impact to the efficacy of biological control, mismatches in thermal tolerance may influence their ultimate impact in biocontrol programs under climate variability. Using laboratory-reared congeneric parasitoid species Cotesia sesamiae and Cotesia flavipes Cameron (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), we examined basal thermal tolerance to understand potential impact of climate variability on their survival and limits to activity. We measured upper- and lower -lethal temperatures (ULTs and LLTs), critical thermal limits [CTLs] (CTmin and CTmax), supercooling points (SCPs), chill-coma recovery time (CCRT) and heat knock-down time (HKDT) of adults. Results showed LLTs ranging -5 to 5°C and -15 to -1°C whilst ULTs ranged 35 to 42°C and 37 to 44°C for C. sesamiae and C. flavipes respectively. Cotesia flavipes had significantly higher heat tolerance (measured as CTmax), as well as cold tolerance (measured as CTmin) relative to C. sesamiae (P˂0.0001). While SCPs did not vary significantly (P>0.05), C. flavipes recovered significantly faster following chill-coma and had higher HKDT compared to C. sesamiae. The results suggest marked differential basal thermal tolerance responses between the two congeners, with C. flavipes having an advantage at both temperature extremes. Thus, under predicted climate change, the two species may differ in phenologies and biogeography with consequences on their efficacy as biological control agents. These results may assist in predicting spatio-temporal activity patterns which can be used in integrated pest management programs under climate variability.,Mutamiswa et al_2018_PONE-D-17-38466CTmin= Critical thermal minima, CTmax= Critical thermal maxima, CF LLT= Cotesia flavipes lower lethal temperatures, CF ULT= Cotesia flavipes upper lethal temperatures, CS LLT= Cotesia sesamiae lower lethal temperatures, CS ULT= Cotesia sesamiae upper lethal temperatures, HKDT= heat knowckdown time, CCRT= chill coma recovery time and SCP= supercooling point,
    Data Types:
    • Dataset
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